Agenda

 

 

 

                                                       Council

 

 

 

                                       14 February 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

 

Our Vision

Happy, healthy people sharing prosperity and knowledge from living sustainably and in harmony with our rural identity, thriving villages, productive and inspiring landscapes.

Our Mission

Leaders in delivering quality, innovative and community focused services today that make a difference for tomorrow.

Core Values

Community focused

Accessible, responsive (we’re here to help), can do attitude, communicative, empathetic.

Integrity

Equitable, honest, ethical, transparent.

Respect

Listening, compassionate, open minded, understanding, patient.

Pride

Caring, enthusiastic, inspiring, accountable.

Innovation

Creative, bold, challenging, flexible.

Collaboration

Partnering, building productive relationships, inclusive.

 

 

 

 


Agenda

 

1.        Opening and Recognition of Traditional Custodians. 5

2.        Reading of Affirmation and Prayer. 5

3.        Apologies. 5

4.        Civic Ceremonies. 5

5.        Confirmation of Previous Meeting Minutes. 5

6.        Councillors Declarations of Interest/Conflict of Interest 5

7.        Meeting Closed To The Public: Release of Information to the Public. 5

8.        Community Participation Time. 6

8.1     Questions on Notice. 6

8.2     Submissions. 6

9.        Petitions. 7

10.     Vibrant Communities. 8

10.1  PLA0089/17 - 299-305 Princes Way Drouin - Use and development of the land for a Service Station and Convenience Restaurant, Display of advertising signs [business identification signs, including internally-illuminated signs] and promotion signs, alteration of access to Road Zone Category 1, and associated works, in accordance with the endorsed plans. 8

10.2  PLA0080/17 - 111-113 Queen Street Warragul - Display of business identification sign, Extend the area of the land used to sell and consume liquor [Cafe and Restaurant liquor license], Increase the number of patrons associated with the sale and consumption of liquor. 85

10.3  Drouin Golf Club Development Plan - Consideration of submissions and revised Development Plan.. 107

10.4  Support for proposed Planning Scheme Amendment - Hazel Drive Warragul. 114

10.5  Purchase of the Former Yarragon Primary School Site. 118

10.6  Consideration of Sponsorship - February 2018. 149

11.     Thriving Economy. 163

11.1  Recreational Vehicle and Tourism Signage Plan.. 163

12.     Safe and Sustainable Environments. 198

13.     Organisational Excellence. 199

13.1  Quarterly Performance Report - Q2 2017/18. 199

13.2  Mid Year Budget Review.. 238

13.3  Debt Collection Services Contract 245

14.     Notices of Motion.. 249

15.     Committee and Delegates Reports. 250

16.     Assembly of Councillors. 251

16.1  Assembly of Councillors Report 251

17.     Mayoral Minute. 262

18.     General Business. 262

 


 

1.      Opening and Recognition of Traditional Custodians

I acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land on which we are meeting and pay my respects to their Elders both past and present. I would also like to acknowledge any other elder of any race or religion that may be in the room tonight.

 

2.      Reading of Affirmation and Prayer

Cr Gauci read the Councillors affirmation, being, ‘We now pause to reflect upon the solemn responsibilities conferred on us by the Parliament of Victoria through the Local Government Act (1989). 

We acknowledge that it is the responsibility of local government to ensure the peace, order and good governance of our Shire. 

We are to be responsible and accountable to our community here in Baw Baw Shire through good governance and leadership. 

Almighty God,

Give wisdom and understanding to the members of this Baw Baw Shire Council.

In all our deliberations help each of us to listen carefully, perceive the best course of action have courage to pursue it and grace to accomplish it.

Amen

3.      Apologies 

4.      Civic Ceremonies

5.      Confirmation of Previous Meeting Minutes

6.      Councillors Declarations of Interest/Conflict of Interest

7.      Meeting Closed To The Public: Release of Information to the Public

Council will close the meeting to the public from 5.00pm to 5.30pm pursuant to the provisions of Section 89(2) of the Local Government Act 1989 in order to deal with:

 

 

Nil Reports

 

 

 

 

Council will open the Ordinary Council Meeting at 5.30pm.

 

8.      Community Participation Time

8.1       Questions on Notice

 

8.2       Submissions

Any community member is welcome to comment or ask questions on any of the officer reports listed in this agenda if it has not been part of another hearing process.

 

Submitters will be given up to 3 minutes to speak on their submission.

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

9.      Petitions

Nil Reports

 

 

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

10.    Vibrant Communities

10.1    PLA0089/17 - 299-305 Princes Way Drouin - Use and development of the land for a Service Station and Convenience Restaurant, Display of advertising signs [business identification signs, including internally-illuminated signs] and promotion signs, alteration of access to Road Zone Category 1, and associated works, in accordance with the endorsed plans.

Senior Statutory Planner  

Directorate:  Planning and Economic Development

 

Ward:         

 

Appendix:     4 attachments

       

 

purpose

For Councillors to consider Planning Permit Application PLA0089/17 for the use and development of the land for a Service Station and Convenience Restaurant, Display of advertising signs, alteration of access to Road Zone Category 1, and associated works at 299 and 305 Princes Way Drouin.

REcommendation

That Council issue a Notice of Decision to approve Planning Permit Application PLA0089/17 to Use and develop the land for a service station and convenience restaurant, display of advertising signs [business identification signs, including internally illuminated signs] and display of promotion signs, alteration of access to road zone category 1, and associated works, in accordance with the endorsed plans at 299 and 305 Princes Way Drouin.

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·        The proposal is to allow for the use and development of a new Service Station (proposed under the banner of 7-Eleven) and a Convenience Restaurant (a future food outlet with associated drive-thru), with associated advertising signs and works.

·        The subject properties comprise 4 allotments sited at 299 and 305 Princes Way Drouin which are within the General Residential Zone.

·        The properties abut Princes Way which is a Road Zone Category 1 under the management of VicRoads.

·        299 Princes Way (one lot) is currently occupied by a dwelling and associated outbuilding.

·        305 Princes Way (three lots) are currently occupied by a vehicle servicing business and associated petrol station (Michelin Tyre Services). Consequently, part of the subject property is already currently used for a Service Station. The proposal intends to extend this existing use to abutting lot at 299 Princes Way.

·        The surrounding land comprises a wide variety of zones and uses.

Ø  Land to the North-East is Low Density Residential Zone comprising a dwelling.

Ø  Land to the North and South are General Residential Zone comprising either single detached dwellings, or various industries/offices.

Ø  Land to the South-West is Low Density Residential Zone occupied by a Caravan Park.

Ø  Land to the North-West is Industrial 1 Zone occupied by various industries.

·        A planning permit is required to:

Ø  Use the land for a Service Station and use of the land for a Convenience Restaurant within the General Residential Zone pursuant to Clause 32.08-2 (Section-2 uses) of the Baw Baw Planning Scheme (the Scheme); and,

Ø  Construct a building or carry out works associated with a use in a Section-2 of Clause 32.08-8 of the Scheme; and,

Ø  Alter access arrangement to a road in a Road Zone Category 1 pursuant to Clause 52.29 of the Scheme; and,

Ø  Display business advertising signs, internally-illuminated signs, and promotion signs pursuant to Clause 52.05-9 of the Scheme; and,

Ø  Buildings and works associated with a use which benefits from existing use rights pursuant to Clause 63.05 of the Scheme.

·        A proposal of this nature must must also address the following Provisions:

Ø  Clause 52.06 – Car parking requirements;

Ø  Clause 52.12 – Service Station requirements;

Ø  Clause 52.20 – Convenience Restaurant and Take-Away Food Premises requirements;

Ø  Clause 52.34 – Bicycle Facilities;

·        The application was referred external to VicRoads (S.55 - Determining Authority) whom consented subject to conditions.

·        The Environment Protection Authority were notified of the application. They have no objections to the application but have made recommendations of potential conditions.

·        Melbourne Water was also notified of the application, who did not provide any response.

·        The application was referred internally to Council’s Health and Engineering Departments whom provided recommended conditions.

·        Six (6) submissions in the form of objections were received during the notice period;

·     The proposal is compliant, and provides a satisfactory outcome, with the relevant Particular Provisions regarding ‘Advertising Signs’, ‘Service Station’, ‘Convenience Restaurant’, ‘Car Parking’, ‘Access’, and ‘Bicycle Facilities’.

·     The proposal is also considered consistent with the State Planning Policy Framework and the Local Planning Policy Framework, including the Municipal Strategic Statement and local planning policies, the provisions of the General Residential Zone and the decision guidelines at Clause 65.01 of the Scheme.

·     The context of the site is noted be beneficial for a redevelopment of a modern Service Station as:

Ø  the land abuts a major arterial road (Princes Way) and it is considered the proposal will not by itself result in drawing more traffic along VicRoads infrastructure but rather tap-on the existing through-traffic;

Ø  the existing petrol station results in identifying the land as potential contaminated under the Environment Protection Act 1979 which reduces the opportunity for the land to return to a sensitive use (such as for accommodation/dwelling) without having to go through an Environmental Audit;

Ø  The immediate character of the area is already affected by multiple use carrying different level of amenity:

Þ      319-327 Princes Way is occupied by an engineering and machine repair and maintenance (Drouin Machining & Maintenance);

Þ      295-297 Princes Way are occupied by a vehicle parts shop and a Sign-making business (TNT Auto Parts and Drouin Signs);

Þ      Land across Princes Way and along Roberts Court are Industrial 1 Zone comprising various warehouse, shop, and engineering businesses;

Þ      Further, the subject site at 305 Princes Way is currently occupied by Drouin Tyre & Battery Service (Michelin) and already from land used as residential purposes.

·        The proposal can adequately replace the existing business and provide an adequate buffer between the surrounding industries (and highway) to the west and the dwellings to the east.

·        The addition of a food outlet and service station close to a pole of employment (Industrial Zone) creates a sound economic nexus that benefits the area by, providing local services, potentially reducing the amount of vehicular traffic by allowing local employees to walk to across Princes Way.

·        The applicant submitted an acoustic report which included specific recommendations that would be implemented to ensure the amenity of the area is no further affected by the operation of the proposal. Appropriate conditions will ensure these recommendations are effective and ongoing.

·        Amongst the requirements recommended to be included on any permit should one be issued are conditions relating to:

Ø  Landscaping;

Ø  drainage/stormwater management (including requirement for drainage plans);

Ø  amenity and acoustic measures (such as hours of deliveries); and

Ø  signage (including the removal of proposed illuminated signage which faces the abutting dwellings).

It is considered these will assist in reducing the impact of the development on abutting land uses.

 

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

·        The proposal may result in land use conflicts if not managed appropriately through conditions. Specifically, the implementation of acoustic requirements will alleviate most these impacts. The proposed conditions are intended to mitigate these impacts providing sufficient support to remediate impact and, if issues arise, ensure adequate compliance.

·        The area is already subject to land use conflict, comprising an Industrial 1 Zone area across Princes Way and the subject land being currently used and operating as a service station and motor vehicle service business. The proposed development will maintain the current land use activities.

·        The objections raised the following issues:

Ø  Financial impact to their property associated with loss of rental revenue or property value.

Ø  Amenity impact associated with noise, traffic, operation, and associated anti-social behaviour.

Ø  Environmental impact associated with the operation and water runoff.

Ø  The saturation of the market for service station.

The saturation of the market and financial impact on property valuation are not grounds of objection that can be considered as part of the planning process.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

·        The proposal may have negative environmental impacts if not managed appropriately through conditions.

·        The contamination of the land associated with the storage of petrochemical goods means the land cannot be reconverted into a sensitive use [e.g. child care center, accommodation/dwelling, etc.] normal to a residential zone without going through the environmental audit and decontamination process required under the Environment Protection Act 1970. The land is already deemed contaminated due to the existence of a service station at 305 Princes Way.

FINANCIAL IMPACT

·        An application fee of $3,213 was received.

·        The proposal will not have financial impact upon Council administrative service unless the applicant or the objectors seek a review of the decision at the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) for the conditions or requirements of the proposed permit.

·        Additional resources or financial cost will be incurred should the applicant or objectors seek a determination at the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT).

·        It is considered that a refusal would be unlikely to be supported by the Tribunal.

·        The establishment of the proposal will result in a revitalization of the subject property that ultimately affect Capital Improved Value and Net Annual Value.

Consultation

·    Notice of the application was given to adjoining and adjacent landowners and occupiers of the subject site via registered post under Section 52(1) (a) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 (the Act) and notice was given via the display of an A3 sign on site for a minimum of 14 days pursuant to Section 52(1) (d) of the Act. Six (6) submissions in the form of objections regarding the proposal were received.

 

·    The applicant responded to the concerns raised in the objections and provided further information, including the provision of an acoustic report identifying the need for an acoustic wall along the boundary, acoustic screens to elements of the building, as well as recommendations regarding delivery hours and waste collection.

 

·    The application was referred internally to Council’s Public Health Department and Council’s Engineers who have not objected to the proposal subject to permit conditions.

 

·    The application was referred externally to the Road Corporation (VicRoads), Melbourne Water, and the Environmental Protection Authority.

 

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This decision assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Strategic Objective 1. Vibrant Communities

 

Strategic Objective 2: Thriving Economies

 

Strategic Objective 4. Growth and Prosperity

 

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This report has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

·    The planning application was submitted and assessed in accordance with the Planning and Environment Act 1987.

·    The business will be subject to the provisions of the Environmental Protection Act 1970 and Food Act 1984

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

10.2    PLA0080/17 - 111-113 Queen Street Warragul - Display of business identification sign, Extend the area of the land used to sell and consume liquor [Cafe and Restaurant liquor license], Increase the number of patrons associated with the sale and consumption of liquor.

Senior Statutory Planner  

Directorate:  Planning and Economic Development

 

Ward:         

 

Appendix:     2 attachments

       

 

purpose

For Councillors to consider Planning Permit Application PLA0080/17 for an increase in the number of patrons, and extension of the licensed area used to sell and consume liquor [liquor license], increase the trading hours for the sale and consumption of liquor, as well as the display of business identification signs at the premises sited at 111 and 113 Queen Street Warragul and known as ‘3 Brothers And An Oven’ [pizzeria and gelataria].

REcommendation

That Council approve Planning Permit Application PLA0080/17 for the use and development in association with a restaurant, including:

·    the sale and consumption of liquor; and

·    the display of business identification signs

in accordance with the endorsed plans at 111-113 Queen Street, Warragul subject to conditions.

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·    The premise is commonly known and trading as ‘3 Brothers and an Oven’ (registered as Venville Corp Pty Ltd); this food and drink premises originally began at 113 Queen Street and is currently in process of expanding into abutting tenancies at 111 Queen Street [sited at the corner of Mason Street] within the Commercial Zone of Warragul CBD. The subject building is also affected by Heritage Overlay HO78 for the building known as ‘Liberty Inn’.

·    A planning permit is required pursuant to Clause 52.27 [Licensed Premises] of the Baw Baw Planning Scheme for the increased of the area, patronage, or hours of trading allowed.

·    The business currently benefits from an on-premises liquor license No. 32305286 [restaurant and café licence] which authorises the supply of liquor for consumption on the licensed premises during the specified approved hours for up to 60 patrons. The specified hours on the license are:

o Sunday: 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.

o On any other day: 8 a.m. and 10 p.m.

o No trade on Good Friday and Anzac Day.

·    The application seeks to extend trading hours as 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily.

·    The proposal to extend the service of alcohol to match the business trading hours every day is considered excessive and inappropriate, specifically the increase of hours from 8 am to 6 am.

It is also considered that the negative social impact of encouraging the consumption of liquor at early hours (before 8 a.m. – Monday to Saturday) on Sunday/Good Friday/ANZAC mornings outweighs any other benefit.

It is considered that the current licence time of 8am is acceptable, and that there has been no justification provided to support this element of the request. Notwithstanding the above, the increase to the hours into the evening to 11pm is considered to be acceptable. The increase will assist in supporting the vibrant nightlife which this part of Queen Street contributes to the area, where there are a number of established restaurants and hotels operating.

·    It is considered appropriate that the serving of alcohol be restricted on Good Friday and to following hours on ANZAC day:

o 12 Midday to 11pm

·    The proposal seeks to extend the red line trading area to reflect the upgraded and extended trading space resulting from the merging of the premise at 111 & 113 Queen Street. The red line trading area is also extended to include a larger footpath trading area along Queen and Mason Street.

·    The increase in floor space associated with the business absorbing the premise sited at 111 Queen Street provides adequate justification to ensure the ‘red line’ area reflects the floor plan of the business.

·    The proposal seeks to increase the number of patrons to a total of 167 patrons, and detailed as follow:

o 73 patrons for the main restaurant [indoor];

o 8 patrons for the rear internal courtyard (beer garden); and

o 86 seats for the footpath outdoor dining area

 

The increase to the numbers within the building is an affective increase of 21 from that approved in the previous planning approval.  This increase is considered to be acceptable given the increase in the floor space.

 

The footpath trading area is considered appropriate and will support a vibrant and liveable activity centre in Warragul by allowing the potential for more on-street trading [pursuant to a local law permit] and therefore creating a dynamic street life.

·    A planning permit is required to construct of display a sign pursuant to Clause 43.01-1 (Heritage Overlay 78).

·    A planning permit is required for the display of business identification signs or promotion signs totalling an advertising area exceeding 8sqm pursuant to Clause 52.05-7 and Clause 43.01-1 (Heritage Overlay 78). This application seeks approval for the following:

o the display of two non-illuminated business identification sign on the corner of the building “Pizza” and “Gelati” which totals 4.26sqm in area;

o the display of a non-illuminated “3 Brothers and an oven” sign along the shopfront window of Queen of a display area of 0.81sqm.

o It also seeks approval for the future display of removal screens associated with the footpath trading area (signs on screen furniture).

·    The premise also includes an existing floodlit “Pizza – Take-Away/Dine-in” sign on the Mason Street façade which has been displayed for a number of years but was recently refreshed around 2014.

·    An existing promotion sign associated with a business that does not operate on the premises “Voyage Fitness” [size undetermined] has been displayed on the Mason Street façade of the building since approximately 2014. There are no records of the approval of a permit for the construction and display of this specific sign. The plans do not retain this sign and it is unclear whether it was displayed without proper approval. Nonetheless, the sign is not considered suitable for the heritage and visual nature of the building along Mason Street and a condition requiring its removal is deemed opportune.

·    The proposed business identification signs are of an appropriate scale/design and location on the building which do not deter from the general streetscape and heritage fabric of the building.

 

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

It is considered that the proposed use and development of the site will contribute to the commercial centre of Warragul and provide an additional service oriented service.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

The proposal will not have negative environmental impacts.

FINANCIAL IMPACT

The proposal will not have financial impact upon Council unless the applicant seeks a determination at the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) for the conditions or requirements of the proposed permit.

 

Consultation

·    Notice of the application was given to adjoining and adjacent landowners and occupiers adjoining the subject site via registered post under Section 52(1) (a) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 (the Act) and notice was requested via the display of an A3 sign on site for a minimum of 14 days pursuant to Section 52(1) (d) of the Act.

·    No submissions were received following the notice period.

·    The proposal was referred internal to Council’s Local Law Team and notice of the proposal was given to VicRoads and VicPol.

·    VicRoads raised concerns regarding certain elements depicted on the submitted plans with regards to the extent of the footpath trading licensed area but did not object to the proposal.

·    VicPol raised no objections.

·    Further notification under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1988 will be required by the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

 

COUNCIL PLAN

This decision assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

 

Strategic Objective 1: Vibrant Communities

1.2       Managing Baw Baw’s growth and development.

 

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This report has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

 

LEGAL

The planning application was submitted in accordance with the Planning and Environment Act 1987 and Liquor Control Reform Act 1988.

 

POLICY IMPACTS

Baw Baw Shire’s Public Health and Wellbeing Plan 2017-2021

Baw Baw Shire Council Community Local Law 2006, including the Footpath Trading Policy.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 

 

 

 


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 


 


 


 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

10.3    Drouin Golf Club Development Plan - Consideration of submissions and revised Development Plan

Coordinator Strategic and Community Planning

Directorate:  Planning and Economic Development

 

Ward:          West

 

Appendix:     6 attachments

       

 

purpose

For Council to consider written submissions to the Drouin Golf Club (DGC) Development Plan (as exhibited in October/November 2017) and adopt the revised Drouin Golf Club Development Plan.

REcommendation

That Council:

1.         Consider all submissions and feedback received as part of the Drouin Golf Club Development Plan consultation.

2.         Adopt the exhibited developments and plan subject to the following amendments:

a.   All changes proposed on the amended “Subdivision Concept Plan, Drouin Golf Club – Sowsee Pty Ltd, Reference No. WC201608 Rev. Q, dated 1 February 2018” with the additions of a notation that all lots interfacing with existing developed Low Density Residential Zone land is to be limited to single storey construction.

3.         Write to submitters and advise them of this decision.

 

 

Key Issues

·        The subject land is zoned Low Density Residential Zone (LDRZ) and a Development Plan Overlay Schedule 7 (DPO7) applies to the land. The subject land has a total of 52.98 hectares contained within 2 parcels.

·        The subject land abuts existing, subdivided and developed LDRZ land to the east and south. A revised Development Plan has been prepared and proposes a total of 134 allotments with an average area size of 2088m2 (Attachment One). 

·        The main issues raised in the community feedback include allotment     sizes; drainage inundation; increase in traffic and upgrade to roads; restrictions on building height and setbacks; more provision for usable open space; landscaping buffers and retention of large trees; and land devaluation and interruption of views. The exhibited Development Plan has been revised as a result of community feedback and includes:

Ø the introduction of a one-way road along the southern, western and part of the eastern interface title boundary in lieu of the exhibited landscape buffer.

Ø an internal road redesign as a result of the introduction of the new one-way road.

Ø the introduction of the requirement for a covenant to be registered on all new interface allotment titles that stipulate building setbacks from interface allotment boundaries.

Ø the introduction of the requirement for a covenant to be registered on all new interface allotment titles that stipulate a building height restriction for dwellings and outbuildings of no more than single storey.

Ø An increase in lot yield from 133 to 134, with an average size of 2088m2.

·        In the 1980s, Drouin Golf Club (DGC) purchased land abutting the golf course to the south. In 1989 a Section 173 Agreement was entered in to between DGC and the then Shire of Buln Buln to construct all 36 holes. In 2011 Council consented to the ending of the Agreement as only 27 holes had been developed and DGC proposed to dispose of the surplus land.

·        Planning Scheme Amendment C89 rezoned the subject land to LDRZ and applied the DPO7 in 2016. Public exhibition of C89 attracted a number of written submissions that raised objections principally relating to DCG interface issues with adjoining LDRZ land. The independent Planning Panel who considered the objections recommended that a number of these issues should be addressed through the Development Plan process.

·        A Development Plan was prepared for the subject land and lodged with Council in August 2017 (Attachment Two). At the Ordinary 25 October 2017 Council Meeting, Council resolved to place the DCG Development Plan on public exhibition to gauge community views and requested officers present a report back to Council following the exhibition period detailing the feedback provided by the community. The October 2017 officer report advised that the then proposed Development Plan still required to address a number of key issues including the open space requirements and interface issues with abutting properties.  The full Drouin Golf Club Development Plan with all background documents forms Attachment Three. 

·        The Development Plan was placed on public exhibition from 27 October 2017 to 26 November 2017 (i.e. 4 weeks). The Development Plan attracted a number of written submissions that raised similar objections to the C89 process around DGC interface issues with adjoining LDRZ land. The exhibited Development Plan has been revised as a result of community feedback. These submissions and the changes to the exhibited Development Plan are further discussed below, in the Consultation section in this council report and in Attachment Five.

·        A Development Plan must precede any planning permit for subdivision. Once the Development Plan is approved by Council, if a subdivision application is lodged in accordance with the Development Plan, then approval is generally granted.

·        There are no third-party rights to a subdivision application that follows an approved Development Plan (i.e. no public notice, no ability for appeals by neighbours). Thus, it is important to ensure that the outcomes sought, are considered during the Development Plan phase or issues are identified that are better addressed as future planning permit conditions.

·        The LDRZ requires minimum lot sizes, dependant on the existence of reticulated sewer. A 4000-square metre minimum is required for unsewered land. This can be reduced to 2000 square metres in the event reticulated sewer is connected to all lots. The subject land is proposed to be connected to reticulated sewer, therefore allowing lots to have a minimum lot size of 2000 square metres.

·        Other key issues principally relate to the DCG Development Plans interface with adjoining LDRZ land. These key issues are further discussed in the Consultation section in this council report.

TRIPLEBOTTOMLINE IMPLICATIONS

Financial Impact

·        At this stage, there are no financial impacts apart from officer time and associated costs.

·        The land associated with this proposal is not covered by the Development Contribution Plan Schedule 2 and therefore costs for infrastructure provision are borne by the developer.

·        The proposed laneway interface will provide a buffer to properties in Fairway Drive.  In order to respond to the interface issues and community concerns it is proposed to accept the road reserve in lieu of the open space requirements.      

Environmental Impact

·        It is not expected that there will be any adverse environmental impacts resulting from the development of the subject land if the revised Development Plan is adopted by Council.

·        The existing waterway/creek line on the subject land is proposed to be modified where limited biodiversity values exist. A drainage reserve is proposed along the waterway to retain the creek line and associated vegetation.

·        Drainage and potential inundation issues will be improved and constructed in accordance with Council and Melbourne Water standards. Onsite water quality and detention works are proposed which involves the construction of retardation basin and wetland along the existing waterway/ creek line. A stormwater management strategy has been prepared for the land.

·        A Cultural Heritage Management Plan is still required and will form part of the planning permit process. 

·        The removal of a remnant patch of native vegetation and 29 scattered trees is proposed to be offset in the Port Phillip and Westernport Catchment or Baw Baw Shire Council with the approval of Council. Therefore, there is no net loss of native vegetation and the removal of the remaining planted vegetation is exempt from requiring planning approval.

Community Impact

•        The development of the subject land for housing has been a contentious proposal for many years and the local community views regarding the future development for the land are well known.

•        In addition to the C89 Planning Scheme Amendment process, the DGC Development Plan has provided an opportunity to resolve some of the community objection to the development of the land for housing. It is acknowledged that there is likely to be community members who may still wish to raise objection to the revised Development Plan, particularly where it is not appropriate to make some of the requested changes to the Plan.

Consultation

·    The Development Plan was placed on public exhibition from 27 October 2017 to 26 November 2017 (i.e. 4 weeks). A community open house drop-in session was held in Drouin during the exhibition period and the Development Plan was placed on Council’s website for comment. An online survey was made available also requesting community feedback.

·    There was an expectation that the developers meet with impacted individual landowners, instead Council Officers met with many of the impacted landowners to discuss concerns. 

·    Forty-three written submissions (thirty seven public submissions and six agency submissions) were received and 62 survey respondents provided feedback to the Development Plan. Ninety percent of the written submissions raised concern or objections. Sixty one percent of survey respondents raised concern or objections. The issues raised in the survey responses reflected the same issues put forward in the written submissions.

·    A summary of the submissions is at Attachment Five. Most of the written submissions were from landowners adjoining or within close proximity to the subject land. 

·    All submissions received have been provided at Attachment Four. 

Allotment sizes and retention of rural type character

·    Many submitters objected to the proposed allotment sizes of 2000m2 and requested allotment sizes of at least 4000m2 to help maintain the rural type character of the area.

·    Response: Clause 21.04 of the Baw Baw planning scheme shows the development plan land in the Drouin Structure Plan as future residential and the more recent Drouin Precinct Structure Plan as Low Density Residential Zone (LDRZ). The minimum subdivision size under the LDRZ for allotments without reticulated sewerage is 4000m2 and with reticulated sewerage is 2000m2. The land is to be provided with reticulated sewerage and therefore allotment sizes of 2000m2 is appropriate. The total number of allotments has been increased from 133 to 134.   

·    An Infrastructure Report has been prepared by Taylor Miller Consulting. Existing LDRZ landowners also have an opportunity under the LDRZ for further subdivision where their land is 4000m2 or greater and the land can be serviced with reticulated sewerage. This will ultimately change the way the existing LDRZ allotments are currently configured and increase the dwelling density in the overall area in accordance with the Drouin Structure Plan. The C89 Part 2 planning panel found in 2016 that there is a current shortage of LDRZ within Drouin and additional LDRZ land is needed to be provided.

Drainage inundation

·     Some submitters raise concern that existing drainage issues along the subject land interface will be exacerbated if the subject land is developed without adequate drainage infrastructure.

·     Response: The provision of drainage infrastructure will be provided to the land in accordance with council standards and requirements. More detail around these matters will be provided at the future planning permit stage via conditions on permit if the Development Plan is approved. In particular, the Stormwater Management Plan that has been prepared for the subject land identifies that potential stormwater options are to be further discussed at the stormwater management plan stage associated with the detail design of the subdivision where easements if required can be identified and set aside.

·     The Infrastructure Report prepared by Taylor Miller Consulting identifies that constructed roads will include kerb and channel, footpaths and underground drainage to service all allotments.

Increase in traffic and upgrade to local roads

·     Some submitters raise safety concerns due to increased traffic and request upgrades to local roads.

·     Response: A Traffic Impact Assessment that has been prepared by Traffix Group concludes that the likely traffic volumes on each of the streets is consistent with (or less then) the volumes suggested within Clause 56.06-8 of the Baw Baw Planning Scheme and the Infrastructure Design Manual for each given street. The assessment further states that there are no traffic engineering reasons why the Development Plan should not be approved.

·     It was identified as part of C89 that the subject land required three access points and must include the two -way entrance at Fairway Drive.

·     The access point at Princes Way has not been changed.  Discussions are underway for the Drouin Bowls Club to move into this precinct.  The proposed larger north-south road in this area is required to be kept in the location proposed to enable safe and efficient vehicle movements and to service any future development that may need to front the road.

·     The need for any new footpaths, lighting and road widening (if any) along existing road reserves outside of the subject land will be provided in accordance with the Infrastructure Design Manual at a time that is determined by Council.

Restrictions on building height and setbacks

·     Many submitters request new development on proposed interface allotments be built as single storey and have a building setback from the interface boundary.

·     Response: The Development Plan has been revised to show building height restriction of no more than single storey is to apply to new development on the interface lots.  It also has been revised stipulating building setbacks at 10m and 20m depending on the lot layout.  There is opportunity to further strengthen this aspect with an on-title agreement (covenant or Section 173).

More provision for usable open space

·     Many submitters raise concerns about the proposed amount and type of open space.

·     Response: An open space context plan has been prepared for the Development Plan (Attachment Six). The context plan shows that the Drouin Precinct Structure Plan identifies a number of future open space reserves to the west and south of the subject land. These reserves in addition to the open space provided by the development plan drainage reserve and existing golf club land provide sufficient open space need for the area.

Landscaping buffer and retention of large trees

·     Many submitters request a landscape buffer on the interface of the subject land with adjoining LDRZ land and the retention of large trees.

·     Response: A landscaping buffer reserve is not proposed to be provided on all new interface allotments. Rather, the Development Plan is to be revised to allow for a laneway road reserve to be provided on the south boundaries of the subject land that will include a vegetated swale drain and verge with street trees which will provide a sufficient landscaping buffer. This approach is in lieu of the original exhibited landscaping buffer. However, the eastern boundary of the subject land is not proposed to have a small road reserve immediately on the interface boundary because most of the adjoining LDRZ allotments are large in size and already have sufficient existing building setbacks. The proposed larger north-south road in this area is required to be kept in the location proposed to enable safe and efficient vehicle movements and to service any future development that may need to front the road.

·     An Ecological (Flora and Fauna) Assessment has been prepared by Paul Kelly Associates Ecological Services. The Assessment identifies the location of scattered trees and golf course plantation trees and concludes that 29 scattered trees are proposed to be removed along with plantation trees. The vegetation and habitat quality for the development plan land is considered to be low and native vegetation offsets have been identified where relevant.

Land devaluation and interruption of views

·     Some submitters state that development of the subject land for housing will devalue their land and new development will interrupt views across to the subject land.

·     Response: The impact of a proposal on property values and the right to a view is generally not a relevant planning consideration when determining the approval or otherwise of a development plan. However, the introduction of interface roads with street trees, building setbacks and height controls will address visual amenity interface issues in accordance with the DPO7 requirements.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This activity assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Strategic Objective 1. Vibrant Communities

1.2 Managing Baw Baw’s growth and development.

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This Drouin Golf Club Development Plan has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

The proposal is governed by the requirements of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 and the Baw Baw Planning Scheme.

POLICY IMPACTS

The DGC Development Plan is in accordance with the requirements of the Baw Baw Planning Scheme, in particular the Drouin Structure Plan and the provisions of the LDRZ and DPO7.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

10.4    Support for proposed Planning Scheme Amendment - Hazel Drive Warragul.

Coordinator Strategic and Community Planning

Directorate:  Planning and Economic Development

 

Ward:          Central

 

Appendix:     4 attachments

       

 

purpose

For Council to support the proposed Planning Scheme Amendment at 57 Hazel Drive Warragul (corner Queen Street Warragul), to modify the Special Use Zone -Schedule 5 to allow a Department Store.

REcommendation

1.   That Council write a letter of support to the Minister for Planning for the proposed proponent lead Planning Scheme Amendment outlining:

a)   the appropriateness of the changes to the zone;

b)   public support for the proposal;

c)   Baw Baw Shire’s inclusion in the Economic Growth Zone; and

d)   The current shortage of retail/commercial space in Warragul.

 

Key Issues

·        Council has been asked to support a proposed proponent led Planning Scheme Amendment at 57 Hazel Drive Warragul on behalf of H.Troon, to amend the existing Special Use Zone Schedule 5 – Warragul East Bulky Goods Precinct (SUZ5).

·        The Planning Scheme Amendment is proposed to allow a discount department store (Kmart) and bottle shop (Dan Murphy’s) to be established on the site.  The applicant has secured these tenants should the proposed Planning Scheme Amendment go ahead.  In addition to these proposed uses, it is expected that a full-line Bunnings will established on the site. 

·        The proposal will be lodged with the Minister for Planning as a Section 20(4) Planning Scheme Amendment under the Planning and Environment Act 1987.  This type of Amendment will not require any formal exhibition/public consultation process as prescribed under Act and the Minister for Planning will make the final decision. 

·        In order for the Minister of Planning to consider using his ministerial powers of intervention and exempt notice provisions; the application must address certain criteria.

·        The application is considered to be of genuine regional significance and meet the objectives of ‘Planning in the Economic Growth Zone’ in the region. 

·        The applicant for the Amendment will be H.Troon.  Preliminary discussions with the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP), Latrobe Valley Authority and Regional Development Victoria have suggested that a letter of support from Council would support the application to the Minister for Planning.  

·        The Amendment proposes to amend the SUZ5.  The current Schedule and Definition of Terms is included as Attachment One.

·        The proposed changes to the SUZ5 are described below and shown in Attachment Two.

 

Current SUZ5

Proposed SUZ5

What does the change do?

Shop – Other than restricted retail is prohibited

Bottle shop as a Section 1 Use (No Permit required) if the minimum floor size is more than 1,000m2

i.e. Dan Murphy’s 

 

Bottle shop as a Section Two Use (Permit Required) if the minimum floor size is between 500m2 and 1,000m2

 

The establishment of a 2nd Bottle shop over 1,000m2 will also require a planning permit (Section 2 use).

 

Bottle shop under 500m2 is a prohibited use. 

Allows the use of a bottle shop on the site, provided it meets the minimum size requirement as per proposed masterplan for the site.

 

Also allows more than one bottle shop to be established on the site is it meets the minimum size requirement.   

 

Shop – Other than restricted retail is prohibited, this includes a Department Store.

 

 

Shop - Department Store as a Section 1 Use (no permit required), must have a minimum floor area of 5,000m2

 

Shop - Department Store as a Section 2 Use (permit required), must have a minimum floor area of 4,000m2

 

Shop – Department store less than 4,000m2 is prohibited

Allows a large format discount department store without a use permit as per the proposed masterplan for the site.

 

Any changes to the Masterplan proposing a smaller department store or more than one department store will require a planning permit. 

Retail Premises - Convenience Restaurant is a Section Two use (permit required).  

Retail Premises – Convenience Restaurant becomes a Section 1 Use (no permit required) provided it is the only one on the site.

 

Any further convenience restaurants will be prohibited.      

Allow only one convenience restaurant to operate on the site. 

Restricted Retail (i.e. bulky goods, Bunnings etc.)

No change

Allows a full-line Bunnings to operate on the site.

 

·        The Warragul Structure Plan identifies the subject land as an ‘existing industrial/employment area’ which is facilitated through the Baw Baw Planning Scheme as the SUZ5. 

·        The applicant has prepared the Warragul East Special Use Zone- Economic Impact Assessment to accompany the application to the Minister for Planning (Attachment Three).  This also includes the proposed site layout/masterplan of the site. 

·        The Economic Impact Assessment identifies previous work completed as part of the Warragul Precinct Structure Plan.  The report suggests  that Warragul needed almost 50,000sqm (at 2013 there was approximately 40,758sqm of retail space) of extra retail space by 2036.

·        This earlier economic analysis assumed the redevelopment of the Bonlac site was imminent and the Mercure Hotel would be developed primary as retail.  It also assumed that the subject site would be developed with ‘bulky goods.’

·        The Warragul East Special Use Zone- Economic Impact Assessment identified that the current retail floorspace in Warragul is approximately 38,200sqm.   

·        The Warragul East Special Use Zone- Economic Impact Assessment has identified that the proposed masterplan development would introduce 292 full time equivalent jobs.   

TRIPLEBOTTOMLINE IMPLICATIONS

Financial Impact

There is no impact on Councils’ financial position   

Environmental Impact

The subject land is located inside the Gippsland Water Waste Water Treatment Buffer. 

Community Impact

·        From the consultation undertaken, the community have overwhelming support for a discount department store in Warragul (See Attachment 4). 

·        Ninety seven percent of respondents to the Facebook Poll (2,662 votes) would support a large format retailer in Baw Baw Shire, with 89% (2,398) supporting the location at Warragul. 

Consultation

·    Engagement was undertaken by a Facebook poll in January 2018.  The poll was ‘live’ for one week.  The results form Attachment Four.

·    Almost 3,500 people clicked on the poll, with 2,750 people participating. 

·    Ongoing discussions have occurred with the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning.  

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This proposed amendment assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

 

Strategic Objective 1: Vibrant Communities

1.2       Managing Baw Baw’s growth and development.

 

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This report has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

The proposal is governed by the requirements of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 and the Baw Baw Planning Scheme.

POLICY IMPACTS

In consideration of this proposed Amendment the following Council Policies and Strategic Documents have been considered:

Ø Baw Baw Planning Scheme;

Ø Baw Baw Settlement Management Plan (2013);

Ø Warragul Town Centre Plan; and

Ø Warragul Precinct Structure Plan (and associated documents). 

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

10.5    Purchase of the Former Yarragon Primary School Site

Coordinator Strategic and Community Planning

Directorate:  Planning and Economic Development

 

Ward:          East

 

Appendix:     3 attachments

       

 

purpose

For Council to consider the consultation outcomes of the survey – ‘community uses of the Former Yarragon Primary School site,’ and determine Council’s interest in purchasing the site through First Right of Refusal process. 

REcommendation

That Council write to the Victorian School Building Authority to confirm Council’s interest in purchasing the former Yarragon Primary School through the First Right of Refusal process for public open space requirements. 

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·    The former Yarragon Primary School site (3-5 Rollo St, Yarragon) was declared surplus in 2015 by the Department of Education and Training.  The school relocated to a new larger site in Loch Street, Yarragon. The Department of Education and Training are confident that the site is large enough to accommodate growth into the future.

·    In 2017 the former Yarragon Primary School was referred to the Fast Track Government Land Service, to fast track the rezoning of land, to enable the best price in an open market.  It was clear during this process that the community wanted the site for community purposes.

·    At the 24 May 2017 Ordinary meeting, Council resolved to “write letters to both the Victorian Treasurer and Minister for Planning requesting that the Department of Treasury and Finance and Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning do not proceed with any rezoning and sale of 3-5 Rollo Street Yarragon until Council and the Community have had sufficient time to identify potential future plans for the site, which could take at least 6 months to complete.”

·    A response was received by the Victorian School Building Authority (Attachment 1) advising that Council has until the 23 February 2018 to undertake community consultation and determine if Council or the community wishes to purchase the site. 

·    A response was received by the Minister for Planning advising “that the Country Fire Authority (CFA) has expressed interest in purchasing a portion of the site [bold added], and is undertaking further due diligence regarding its suitability.”  The response also states that Member for Eastern Victoria, Harriet Shing has been engaging with the local community, individuals and organisations to discuss the potential for some beneficial community uses that may be complimentary to CFA activities and facilities.

·    Running alongside Council’s process is the Yarragon 2030 initiative, which is a community led – community planning for Yarragon.  The initiative was partly funded through Community Development Grants 2017/18 and is further supported within the Strategic and Community Planning Team (through staff time/resources etc..).  

·    In conjunction with the Yarragon 2030 initiative, consultation was conducted between 5 December 2017 and 12 January 2018 (using Survey Monkey and the Have Your Say Process).  Officers also visited Yarragon to encourage participation in the consultation. 

·    The consultation results of both the Council and the Community’s consultation are similar. The questions were designed to be alike, to reduce the possibility of confusion and perceptions that Council and community were not working cooperatively. The summary of responses are:

Preferred uses

Community Survey interim findings                                   (Number of respondents = 96)

Council’s ‘Have Your Say’ where answer was included in their top 3 preferred uses (number of respondents = 101)

1

New CFA Fire Station (57.3%)

Community Centre or Hub (38.6%)

2

A Community Centre or Hub (49.6%)

New CFA Fire Station (34.7%)

3

Community Gardens (48.09%)

Community Gardens (27.7%)

4

Municipal Pool (40.3%)

Skatepark (24.8%)

5

Public Toilets (35.7%)

Kid’s Playground (20.8%)

 

New CFA Fire Station

·    The existing Yarragon CFA Station is in Murray Street Yarragon.  It is in a residential area (and General Residential Zone) which constrains expansion of the station and facilities. 

·    The CFA has indicated interest in part of the site.  (refer attachment 2)

·    It may be possible for Council to acquire the site for community purposes and in time transfer/sell/lease the land to the CFA. 

·    Council can continue to advocate on behalf of the community and the need for a new CFA station in Yarragon.  

Community Centre/Community Hub

·    Council is currently investigating the concept of community hubs through the Community Hubs Strategy.  The Strategy is due for completion in 2018. 

·    The Municipal Early Years Infrastructure Plan is also underway and due for completion in 2018. 

·    There is anecdotal evidence that there is limited meeting space in Yarragon for community groups however. The survey showed further support for community hub uses; such as historical centre, outdoor gym, sustainability hub, youth centre and an arts space.  Posts on Council’s social media also supports the need for a men’s shed at the location.

Community Garden/Open Space     

·    The Council Plan (2017-2021) identifies the Strategy: “Support the community to enhance their health and wellbeing.”  Currently Council is supporting the food security initiative in conjunction with the West Gippsland Primary Care Partnership.  The Baw Baw Food Security Coalition supports this work.   

·    Current land use planning policy for the site, as determined through the Baw Baw Planning Scheme and Yarragon Structure Plan (2010) identifies the site for future residential needs. 

·    The Open Space Strategy (2014) does not identify any needs for a community garden in this location.

·    The Open Space Strategy (2014) examined open space requirements across Baw Baw Shire.  The south east of the Shire, incorporating Yarragon, recommends an additional four hectares of Neighbourhood Park with a distance of 600m to existing reserves.  The Strategy outlines a need for new parks to be located in new developments as they are developed. 

·    The Open Space Strategy (2014) does indicates that the majority of public open space particularly within Yarragon, is classified as ‘active’, and tends to serve a sport function.

·    The Strategy also identifies that the focus of future open space planning in Yarragon will be on the Dowton Park Recreation Reserve which provides for passive and active recreation.  A number of projects are identified in the Long-Term Infrastructure Plan (2017-2027) to improve Dowton Park Recreation Reserve as identified in the Dowton Park Recreation Reserve Master Plan 2008.   

Municipal Pool or other Recreation Facility (i.e. Basketball Stadium)

·    In 2016 Council opened the Warragul Leisure Centre as the Shire’s premiere swimming facility.  There are no other aquatic facilities to be constructed.   

·    The Dowton Park Recreation Reserve Master Plan 2008 identifies the potential for a new stadium, to be located near the primary school.

·    Council is currently undertaking a Recreation Strategy, due for completion in 2018. 

Skatepark

·    Council considered the location of a new skatepark in Yarragon at the Ordinary 27 April 2016 Council Meeting.  Council resolved to:

o Adopt(s) Howard Park (Site 2) as the preferred location for a skatepark in Yarragon; and

o Seek(s) completion of the concept design for this location, along with estimate and risk assessment by 30 June 2016.

·    The skatepark is expected to be built in 2018 at Howard Park, after funding was received from the Latrobe Valley Authority earlier this year.  

·    It is noted that at the time the former Yarragon Primary School site was not considered. 

Kid’s Playground

·    The Open Space Strategy (2014) identifies that the focus of future open space planning in Yarragon will be on the Dowton Park Recreation Reserve which provides for passive and active recreation.

Alternate Activities

·    While the community has provided suggested priorities for the site, other strategic planning work being undertaken by Council has identified the need for land to establish facilities to support the tourism industry.

·    The draft Recreational Vehicle (RV) and Tourism Signage Plan to be considered by Council at the Ordinary 14 February 2018 Council Meeting, has identified Yarragon as a key town and location for the provision of RV facilities. As such this site may also provide an opportunity for the establishment of overnight RV stop.

TRIPLEBOTTOMLINE IMPLICATIONS

Financial Impact

·    The First Right of Refusal has been extended to provide Council an opportunity to identify community uses for the site.

·    The identification of a community use is required to secure purchase of the site for a reduced fee for community use (including a restriction on title) in order to satisfy the government land sales requirements. 

·    If Council fails to identify an adequate community use to satisfy these requirements, Council has the option to purchase the site on the open market without a restriction on title.

·    The cost for Council to purchase the site with a restriction on Title is determined by the Valuer General. At this time the cost is unknown, as the Department do not provide this until a Council has applied to purchase.

·    In this instance if Council wished to secure the property on behalf of the community the option of purchasing with a restriction on Title would be the best outcome. Any purchase in the 17/18 financial year would be an unbudgeted expense. Given the current timing and negotiations that would need to take place a purchase in the 18/19 year is more likely and could be considered in the budget process.

·    There is no allocated budget in the Long-Term Infrastructure Plan (2017-2027) to invest in establishing potential community uses at this location.   

Environmental Impact

Purchase of the site can allow for positive environmental outcomes with the establishment of a sustainability hub, community garden or to allow for a passive open space use. 

Community Impact

·        Members of the community would like to see the former primary school site retained in public hands.  As detailed above, Yarragon has adequate public open space with Dowton Park Recreation Reserve identified as the key location for passive and active open space in Yarragon. 

·        Part of the former Yarragon Primary School site was donated by the the Rollo family.  In addition, the community raised money to assist the Department of Education and Training to acquire the new Primary School site in Loch Street, Yarragon.

·        Survey results from the recent consultation show overwhelming support for Council to invest in retaining the the site and establishing a community use at this location.      

Consultation

·        Council conducted a ‘Have Your Say’ consultation from the 5 December 2017 – 12 January 2018 to gather information about respondent’s preferred uses for the site. The number of responses (104) was thought to be sufficient to represent community views.  

·        Furthermore, the results of an independent community consultation that is being carried out by the Yarragon community (as part of a broader survey to inform the development of a Community Plan, i.e Yarragon 2030) included a further 96 respondents (although there may be some overlap). 

·        The ‘Have Your Say’ consultation results form part of this report (Attachment 3).  These show:

Ø  Almost 90% of respondents were residents of Yarragon.

Ø  Almost 90% of respondents wanted to be kept informed about progress and outcomes of the former Yarragon Primary School Site.

Ø  Almost 98% of respondents supported Council’s investment in retaining the former Yarragon Primary School Site.

·        The preferred community uses as identified both in the ‘Have Your Say’ survey and Yarragon 2030 survey have been discussed above.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This report assists with the achievement of the key strategic objectives as set out in the Council Plan 2017- 2021:

Strategic Objective 1: Vibrant Communities

1.1       Quality community focused services, facilities and infrastructure to support a growing community.

1.3       A vibrant, healthy and inclusive community.

1.4       Thriving town centers, rural and remote communities.

Strategic Objective 4: Organisational Excellence

4.2       Positive leadership, advocacy and decision making around shared goals

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This report has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

·        Under section 5(2)(d) of the Local Government Act 1989, Council is able to acquire, hold, deal with or dispose of property (including land) for the purpose of performing its functions and exercising its powers.

·        Normal requirements for a valuation in accordance with Government policy will apply, along with standard Contracts of Sale and Transfer of Land documents.

POLICY IMPACTS

·        Purchase would be supported by Council’s property policy.

·        If Council proceeds with purchase under FRoR the Victorian Government Land Transactions Policy and Guidelines (April 2016) will apply.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 

 

 


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 


 


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  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

10.6    Consideration of Sponsorship - February 2018

Coordinator Strategic and Community Planning

Directorate:  Planning and Economic Development

 

Ward:          All

 

Appendix:     3 attachments

       

 

purpose

For Council to consider two sponsorship applications submitted in accordance with the Community Funding Assistance Program guidelines.

REcommendation

That Council:

1.   Supports the sponsorship request from the Warragul and West Gippsland Agricultural Society Inc for $3000 for the 2018 Warragul Show. 

2.   Supports the sponsorship request from Women In Gippsland for $3000 for the 2018 Gippsland International Women’s Day community event.   

 

Key Issues

·        At its 11 May 2016 Ordinary Council Meeting, Council resolved to endorse the Community Funding Assistance Program document and launch the Program.  The Community Funding Assistance Program included an event sponsorship category.

·        Two applications for sponsorship have been received:

Ø  Warragul and West Gippsland Agricultural Society Inc have applied for sponsorship of the 2018 Warragul Show. The application was received on 12 December 2017 (Attachment One).   

Ø  Women in Gippsland has applied for sponsorship for a community event that aligns with International Women’s Day 2018. The application was received on 1 February 2018 (Attachment Two).

·        The applications for all sponsorships requests have been assessed by Council Officers. (Attachment Three). 

Warragul and West Gippsland Agricultural Society Inc

·        The applicant is seeking a Level Three - Regional/State Events sponsorship of $5,000.

·        The application meets the Sponsorship guidelines, but promotional risks have been identified where the timing of the event could result in Council not being duly acknowledged for its financial support, if given. A condition could be added to a grant that will treat the risk.

·        The 2018 Warragul Show will be the 133rd event of its kind. It will run over two days: 3-4 March 2018. The first day is ‘Show Day’ which reliably attracts people and visitors of all ages from the community. The second day is allocated to horse events.

·        The Warragul Show has been funded more than three times through the Community Development Grants.

·        The application has been identified as not fitting the criteria for a regional/state event, and thus the local event criteria has been considered. 

Women in Gippsland

·        The applicant is seeking Level Two - Local Events sponsorship of $3,000.

·        The application meets the Sponsorship guidelines.

·        The event appears to target women in the workforce and will be delivered during usual business hours.

TRIPLEBOTTOMLINE IMPLICATIONS

FINANCIAL IMPACT

·        The funding allocation for Sponsorship is allocated from the Community Development Grants budget of up to $300,000 and required $12,500 for the Baw Baw Shire Smartygrants Subscription. 

·        Council have allocated $247,485 through the Community Development Grants Program, and a further $24,545 has been allocated to Sponsorship applications. 

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

The determination of these applications does not have any identified environmental impacts.

COMMUNITY IMPACT

The determination of these applications will provide opportunity for seed funding for community events and activities. 

Consultation

Not applicable.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This Community Funding Assistance Program assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017:2021:

Strategic Objective 1: Vibrant communities

1.3 A vibrant, healthy and inclusive community.

1.4 Thriving town centres, rural and remote communities.

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This program has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

Successful applications for level two, three and four sponsorship are required to enter a sponsorship agreement to ensure funding is appropriately spent.

POLICY IMPACTS

The sponsorship applications have been assessed in accordance with the endorsed Community Financial Assistance Program.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 

 

 


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

11.    Thriving Economy

11.1    Recreational Vehicle and Tourism Signage Plan

Business Development Officer

Directorate:  Planning and Economic Development

 

Ward:         

 

Appendix:     3 attachments

       

 

purpose

The purpose of this report is for Council to consider the adoption of the Recreational Vehicle (RV) and Tourism Signage Plan following public consultation.

REcommendation

1.   That Councillors notes and adopt the Recreational Vehicle and Tourism Signage Plan.

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·    In December 2015, a report was presented to Council with options for promoting Baw Baw Shire as a destination that welcomes RV tourism to the region. It was determined that more work needed to be done in conjunction with the Business Advisory Board (BAB) to develop a plan for RV tourism.

·    In June 2017 TRC Tourism was appointed to complete work in developing a Recreational Vehicle and Tourism Signage Plan.

·    Extensive industry and stakeholder consultation and research was undertaken. A draft plan was presented to the Business Advisory Board (BAB) in September 2017. Feedback was sort from BAB members as well as other committees of Council and members of the broader Baw Baw Shire Community through a public consultation period using Have Your Say.

·    Feedback from the public consultation has been recorded and can be viewed in Attachment 1. The feedback was overwhelmingly in support of the project with some further suggestions on locations for RV facilities.

·    This feedback has been considered and the report updated. A breakdown of the feedback and the changes that have been made to the report can be found in Attachment 2 and the final report can be found in Attachment 3.

·    While this plan is specific to the RV tourism market it is a well-considered document incorporating a number of other Council adopted documents. It will also have links with work that is currently being prepared including the Economic Development Strategy, the Visit Baw Baw Marketing Plan, the Visit Baw Baw Website Redevelopment, and the Destination Action Plans for Walhalla and Surrounds, Noojee and Surrounds and Yarragon and Surrounds.

·    The RV and Tourism Signage plan was presented to the Business Advisory Board (BAB) on Monday 4 December 2017 and endorsed as a document that should be supported by Council.

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

There are no community impacts associated with this report.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

There are no environmental impacts associated with this report.

FINANCIAL IMPACT

Future costs may be incurred by Council for infrastructure development however these will be budgeted as part of future budgets.  

Consultation

The Business Advisory Board, tourism and business community members and members of the general Baw Baw Shire community have been consulted in the preparation of this report.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This Recreational Vehicle Tourism Signage Plan assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Objective:       Thriving Economy

Strategy:        Develop a Destination Tourism Campaign

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This Recreational Vehicle Tourism Signage Plan will be considered under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities. Amendments will be recommended to ensure compatibility if required.

LEGAL

There are no legal issues associated with this report.

POLICY IMPACTS

There are no policy impacts associated with this report.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 

 

 


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

Baw Baw Shire Recreational Vehicle
and Tourism Signage Plan
20 November 2017


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ContentExecutive Summary	2
Baw Baw Shire and Recreational Vehicle (RV) Tourism	3
RV facilities within the region	5
Meeting the Needs of the Market into the Future	6
Baw Baw’s Hero Experiences	7
Regional Products	9
Baw Baw Shire RV Strategy - Cluster Approach	10
Location Specific Opportunities and Recommendation	11
Recommended actions and infrastructure priorities	13
RV Infrastructure Recommendations: short – medium term	15
Criteria for assessing Proposed RV Facilities	16
Case Study - Potential Noojee RV Stop – options for location and possible benefits
.................................................................................................................................18
Tourism Signage Observations	19
Concluding comments	20
Appendix 1: The current visitor market, the RV market and trends	21
Appendix 2: Heyfield RV Rest Stop Case Study	27
AcknowledgementsThe Baw Baw Recreational Vehicle and Tourism Signage Plan report has been prepared by TRC Tourism Pty Ltd for Baw Baw Shire Council.DisclaimerAny representation, statement, opinion or advice, expressed or implied in this document is made in good faith but on the basis that TRC Tourism is not liable to any person for any damage or loss whatsoever which has occurred or may occur in relation to that person taking or not taking action in respect of any representation, statement or advice referred to in this document.Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 20171


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Executive Summary
Baw Baw Shire currently has two main RV Visitor markets – those travelling through the region as part of a Melbourne – Sydney route or to East Gippsland, and those who are visiting the Shire specifically for the regional tourism product. Each of these markets has potential to grow, generating economic and regional development benefits for the region, however each is seeking different products and experiences.
This plan identifies priority actions for Baw Baw Shire to consolidate the RV experience at the Shire’s most high-profile RV destination, Walhalla and surrounding mountain river areas. Further actions will help to grow the region’s supporting experiences, leveraging the popularity of Walhalla, and the Sydney- Melbourne touring route, to grow RV tourism throughout the Shire.A coordinated and strategic approach underpins the recommended actions in this report, building on the region’s strengths and identifying opportunities for future growth. While there are some high profile and well-established tourism experiences already within the Shire, there are many further opportunities that  are in the early stages of the tourism lifecycle. Actions focusing on the following
themes are identified: Hero Experiences, Supporting Experiences, Industry development, Signage and Visitor Information, and Regulation.
Implementation of the plan in conjunction with business owners and operators   will create targeted opportunities for through travellers to stop, stay longer and plan a return to Baw Baw Shire. For those with Baw Baw as their destination, improved signage, visitor information and strategic development of RV facilities, in addition to careful packaging of products will increase their understanding of the experiences on offer in the Shire, and satisfaction while they are in the region.Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 20172


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Baw Baw Shire and Recreational Vehicle (RV) TourismThis document reports on the project commissioned by Baw Baw Shire to develop a plan for Recreational Vehicle tourism, and a Tourism Signage Plan (the Plan) for the shire. The Plan is aligned with the Council’s Economic Development Agenda, and is based on extensive consultation and consideration of the views of stakeholders within the Shire. This section of the Plan gives an overview of Baw Baw Shire’s current situation. A more extensive analysis of tourism data relating to Baw Baw Shire, Gippsland, and RV tourism is contained in Appendix 1.Baw Baw Shire RV visitors
There is a lack of recent, reliable RV visitation data for the Baw Baw Shire. However, using data from Gippsland, Victoria and stakeholder groups such as the Caravan and Camping Association (refer Appendix 2), and interviews with stakeholders, TRC Tourism has established there are two main groups of RV visitors to the Shire:
îThrough travellers (Sydney – Melbourne market, East Gippsland and South Coast NSW visitors) generally staying one or two nights only.
Caravan / campers / RV visitors to the Baw Baw Shire. This group is made up of intra-regional (from within the Shire and other Gippsland) and Melbourne metropolitan visitors, particularly from the Eastern suburbs.
What are RVs?
RV’s are simply recreational vehicles most often with some form of accommodation facility within them. It includes small vans often hired, through to larger caravan and third wheelers. The RV market has grown and continues to grow as a favourite form of transport and accommodation for younger markets and retiring baby boomers. RV-based visitation can benefit country towns with visitors often travelling in off-peak / shoulder seasons, visiting and
spending money in communities that are otherwise ‘off the beaten track’.
îBaw Baw Shire is not currently a significant destination or hub for ‘grey nomad’ or high-end RV Visitors.It is estimated that a small proportion of through-travellers currently stop and camp within the Baw Baw Shire. This is likely due to the proximity of the shire to Melbourne. Melbourne based travellers, when they reach Baw Baw Shire are either not far from home on either the outward or return journey and so are likely to continue beyond the shire in either direction.
A portion of the through travellers do stop overnight (or longer) within the Baw Baw Shire - due to the nature of long distance travel (driver fatigue and rest requirements), and the propensity of Grey Nomads and other RV traveller segments to travel over longer periods of time, and their preferences for
budget-friendly options. These visitors stay in free campgrounds, National Park camp sites (or other crown land) or commercial caravan parks.
What does Baw Baw Shire currently offer RV visitors?
Baw Baw Shire currently offers a range of free and low-cost RV caravan and camping opportunities. They occur across a variety of land tenures and management regimes, including commercial camp grounds, National Parks and other Crown land reserves. Some facilities are aged and of poorer quality while some sit in outstanding natural settings. Formal (Council provided) information on opportunities and facilities available is generally poor, although there are
alternative sources of information such as Wikicamps App.
Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 20173


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For some travellers on the Sydney Melbourne touring route, lack of information on available stops and the products on offer in Baw Baw will prevent exploration off the main routes. For others Baw Baw has many narrow winding
roads that will not be suitable for a portion of the recreational vehicle touring market.
There are numerous caravan parks within the region that have a high number  of permanent residents and offer low cost long term accommodation. Many of these do not offer a setting that is appealing to the main market segments currently visiting Baw Baw. The visitors that come specifically to camp within the Baw Baw Shire prefer holiday-oriented caravan Parks such as Warragul Gardens Holiday Park and Glen Cromie Caravan park, and camp grounds in natural areas / crown reserves such as Seninis Campground, Toorongo Falls and Mt Baw Baw National Park.Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 20174


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RV facilities within the region
Baw Baw Shire has recently invested in stand-alone facilities to service the needs of RV travellers, including dump points (Rawson and Neerim South) and several long vehicle parking sites behind the shopping centre at Yarragon. Usage rates of these facilities is not formally monitored, although there are indications that usage of the dump sites is minimal.
The Rawson dump site is the nearest public dump available to RV campers in Walhalla which is a major attraction within the region, and regularly experiencing peak periods of demand for RV camp sites. The Rawson dump site is locked with the keys available from the adjacent General Store. Informally, the General Store reported that there can be up to two requests for the key per day in Summer, dropping to as low as one request per fortnight in winter / off peak seasons.
The Logan Park Racing site in Warragul has power points and parking available, however it is not formally promoted as a camp ground. There are regular Tuesday and Thursday race events at Logan Park, and other special events, during which it is unsuitable as an RV camp ground – therefore cannot be relied upon by visitors.
There are several day rest areas that are also appealing to RV visitors, including Picnic Point and Bellbird Park in Drouin, and others adjacent to the highway. Some of these are known to be unofficially used as overnight stops for RV travellers, however this may technically illegal and campers can be fined under the relevant by- laws. The approach to enforcement is at the discretion of Council officers and is inconsistent.
Commercial caravan parks that cater to the RV market include the Warragul Gardens Holiday Park and Glen Cromie. Warragul Gardens allows non-guests to use its dump on a fee for service basis, however this may not be well known amongst RV travellers. Glen Cromie does not have an RV dump. There may be opportunities to
consider facilities at Drouin in later years.
For the more self-reliant visitors, several free sites exist within the Shire. They are managed by other agencies including Parks Victoria and the Department of Environment, Land Water and Planning (DELWP). Seninis campground is well maintained and patrolled and is in a very scenic setting on a river. Toorongo Falls operated by DELWP needs refurbishment but sits within a popular and attractive natural setting. Both offer simple drop toilets and fireplaces.Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 20175


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Meeting the Needs of the Market into the FutureOverview
It is timely for Baw Baw Shire to be taking stock of the opportunities associated with RV visitors to the Shire, and to identify a strategic and proactive approach to managing and growing this market segment. TRC Tourism believes that in the short term, the best approach to catering for this market is to create a high- quality RV offering at the Shire’s major RV-attracting site, Walhalla. Additional visitor information, facilities and infrastructure combined with well packaged supporting regional products will encourage visitors to stay longer in the region either side of their visit to Walhalla and Baw Baw National Park. The other major opportunity for the Shire is to encourage through travellers to stop within the Shire (either in towns or at visitor sites) and to provide visitor information at
those sites that will encourage longer (or return) visitation.
Applying the visitor experience lens to developing RV tourism
Tourism planning and development increasingly recognises that a successful tourism destination offers a range of visitor experiences. Experiences can be classified according to a ‘hierarchy’ based on their uniqueness, reflection of the region’s brand (or ‘positioning’) and ability to draw visitors to the region. Visitors have become increasingly sophisticated, seeking ‘experiences’ that are engaging,
memorable and reflect the true character of the destination.
Hero experiences are the most unique and compelling visitor experiences on offer in a destination. They can be a place, product (tour / attraction / accommodation), or combination of these. They may be the most high-profile tourism experiences within a destination. They can draw visitors to a region, but they alone do not make up the visitor experience. In successful destinations, the hero experiences are strongly supported by a range of regional and local
experiences.
In the longer term, there is an opportunity to develop and grow awareness of a RV touring route within the Shire. This could highlight the region’s diverse and beautiful landscapes, paddock-to-plate farmgate experiences, cultural heritage and creative hubs. This is a longer-term project however, as many of the features
of such an experience are in their infancy or not reliably available to visitors at present.
Regional experiences support and round out the visitor experience, and give depth to a destination. They should also align with the region’s brand. They play an important role in a destination such as Baw Baw Shire which has a significant amount of day visitation and VFR market.Neighbouring Shires expressed a desire to work collaboratively with Baw Baw, noting that visitors do not recognise Shire boundaries. An upcoming Gippsland wide Destination Management Plan presents an opportunity to look more broadly at touring patterns across Gippsland and plan for their growth.In terms of RV tourism in Baw Baw Shire, the concept of Hero and Regional
experiences is relevant and helps to create context for priorities in RV tourism development.
Importantly packaging products and providing that information to potential visitors is likely to have the greatest impact on visitation.Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 20176


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Baw Baw’s Hero Experiences
Walhalla Historic Township
Walhalla is a unique destination within the Baw Baw Shire and much further afield. It offers visitors a unique setting and opportunity to visit and stay in a living heritage town. It is a high profile and well recognised experience within the Shire. Walhalla is a busy destination for visitors with RVs. There is currently a lack of capacity to cater for the demand of camping and RV visitors to Walhalla (and a range of safety and environmental concerns arising from this situation). The community has identified a priority project that will address the current shortfall in RV camp sites, increase the opportunity for income from this segment and to
make visitation from RVs more environmentally and socially sustainable.
As happens in many locations, existing campgrounds were designed 20 to 30 years ago for a small tent per vehicle. The market has changed and continues to change towards vehicle based touring towing caravans, camper trailers of staying
in RVs. The existing campground is now unsuitable for this market shift and a different solution is required
TRC Tourism recommends the Walhalla Department of Education site be transferred to the Walhalla Management Board to develop an additional RV accommodation site. This will add capacity and allow the town to cater for and gain some income from the currently unmanaged RV free campers. It will also address safety and sustainability concerns and allow the scenic and environmental values of Walhalla to be protected. This project should be accompanied by communication of changing arrangements and implementation of management actions to eliminate camping in unofficial sites in Walhalla. The Rawson dump site can be packaged as part of staying in Walhalla at the proposed new site allowing it to be better utilised.Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 20177


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Mt Baw Baw Alpine Resort
As one of Victoria’s Alpine Resorts, and with good proximity to Melbourne, Mt Baw Baw Alpine Resort (and National Park) also offers a hero experience within the Shire. Snow sports and the alpine environment offer an experience that is unique within the region. However, access to Mt Baw Baw Alpine Resort is via roads that are narrow, winding and generally not suitable for large RV vehicles. This report does not focus on growing RV visitation to Mt Baw Baw Alpine Village considering the road and its suitability for longer RVs.
However, it is possible that the resort will cater for the smaller end of the RV size (Juicy vans and similar), as a part of its continued efforts to grow ‘green season’ tourism. Green season tourism will utilise the resort’s nature based tourism offer and has potential to grow with the proximity to Melbourne and the growing areas
of Gippsland including the Latrobe Valley.
A narrow and at times winding road to the resort presents some challenges for larger RV vehicles. A number of the consultations with stakeholders and operators as part of this plan development discussed the option for sealing the South Face Road. TRC Tourism understands that this is subject to a broader debate and business case process and for the purposes of this report will assume it remains as it is. Should the road be sealed, it would offer transport options that open up the touring options for RVs, linking the Latrobe Valley and Walhalla
regions.
Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 20178


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Regional Products
Attractive and popular locations, activities and experiences that support the hero experiences within the Baw Baw Shire include:
These regional products should be clearly mapped and promoted to visitors to the Shire at major visitor sites as well as through online visitor information sources.
Increasing awareness of the experiences available will encourage visitors to stay longer and to return. It is also noted a product audit of regional attractions could
be undertaken to help link and promote experiences within the Shire.
Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 20179Villages and towns of the hinterland and their produce

Noojee and Noojee historic trestle bridge and rail trail

Glen Cromie Caravan Park and recreation area

Scenic driving routes (green,  rolling hills and rural landscapes)National Parks and other Crown Land natural areas and reservesBlue Rock Lake


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

Baw Baw Shire RV Strategy - Cluster Approach
In analysing the opportunities and proposed directions for Baw Baw Shire to grow RV tourism, TRC Tourism proposes a ‘cluster’ approach. This would be based on a
coordinated approach by towns, villages and localities within Baw Baw Shire, based on similar features and ability to meet the needs of the RV market, and to capitalise on current facilities, products and activity. The proposed plan will help the clusters to foster and benefit from RV tourism growth in the region.
The following summary identifies priority actions for each cluster, and gives a focus for each sub-region to cater for RV tourism. Clear signage at each cluster will be vital to assist visitors to access the RV facilities.•Improve Walhalla’s camping opportunities through acquisition and development of the old school site.
•Allocation of long vehicle parking within Walhalla township, in addition to changing the campground to be more RV friendly.
•Active regulation of camping in non-designated sites.
•Promote use of Rawson and Erica route to Walhalla, and use of RV dump and suitable facilities in these towns.
•Addition of allocated long vehicle parking with good proximity to dump site in Rawson and town centre in Erica. An initial allocation of 3 long vehicle parking sites is recommended.
•Identify alternative security for Rawson dump to enable dump to be unlocked for uncomplicated use by visitors.
•Provision of up-to-date and comprehensive information.
•Promote visitor opportunities with appropriate parking and other services and facilities for RV visitors (including day visitors and those touring through the region).
•Develop suggested itineraries and linkages with nearby and regional RV-friendly facilities.
•Allocated long vehicle parking sites within each locality / township, if possible within close proximity to existing services such as public toilets, accessible potable water, and existing dump facility. An initial allocation of 3 long vehicle parking sites is recommended per town.
•Identify gaps in RV facility and experience provision, and feasible opportunities for local businesses or community to address these gaps.
•Investigate Noojee as a possible free RV site on Council managed land near the river.
•Identify a prefered site for the provision of visitor information within Warragul town centre. It is preferable that the site/s have with good access to 4 - 6 long parking sites and easy access to toilet facilities. A location that is accessible to the town centre will encourage visitors to purchase supplies or eat/drink /shop while they are stopped.
•An additional visitor information facility would help to inform visitors of activities, facilities and experience on offer within the Shire and help plan itineraries for repeat visits. Improved signage to existing and new RV facilities.
•	Lardner Park offers an event venue that is regionally significant and linking other RV sites and opportunities to the Lardner Park calendar will help provide a further market and increase the likelihood of private investment in improving facilities for RV travellers
•	Identify options for growing the current RV visitation to Yarragon. This could include improving awareness of existing long vehicle parking, adding an additional 3 long vehicle parking sites, and investigation of possible RV overnight stop site on Council managed land.
Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201710Drouin – Warragul – YarragonNoojee – Neerim – Neerim SouthWalhalla – Mountain Rivers Trail – Rawson, Erica


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Location Specific Opportunities and RecommendationYarragon Village
Yarragon Village, located on the highway, offers easy access for RV travellers to shopping and dining options creating an appealing stop location that is already popular with RV visitors. They are already catered for with long vehicle parking and toilet facilities adjacent to the shopping precinct. This could be enhanced
with additional long vehicle parking sites and potentially an overnight RV stop.
This process would give commercial operators the ability to participate, as well as any interested community groups or alternative proponents including a town based model such as Heyfield (see Case Study Appendix 2). The Yarragon
Business Association indicated strong support for growing RV facilities in the town and may be interested in working with Council or an individual proponent.
It is noted that a demand assessment has not been completed to provide the evidence into whether a facility is viable. An EOI to the market will help test the feasibility with the private sector able to judge whether to invest and risk capital based on their knowledge of the market available.TRC Tourism notes the potential opportunity to convert an existing site at Yarragon to cater for overnight RV visitors given the lack of a commercial solution within the town. Depending on the site chosen, it could require landscaping and infrastructure installation (toilets, power, possible dump site, rubbish collection). Options would include establishing a commercially-run holiday caravan park, or a free camping site.If an RV overnight stop is to be developed at an existing Council-managed site
that is currently used for other purposes, the following costs would likely be incurred:
Should Council decide to commit to a site in Yarragon - TRC Tourism recommends an Expression of Interest process (or similar) be run, where potential proponents could put forward their proposals for the site testing the
commercial interest in the site to avoid ongoing significant costs to ratepayers, addressing:
î
î
compliance with Victoria’s Competitive Neutrality Policy
requirements for landscaping / fire and safety of the site, other regulatory requirements
proposed pricing (if commercial opportunity is proposed)
ongoing management arrangements, including any implications and support required from Council, if any.
î
î
Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201711Cost category	Indicative cost	Comments
estimate
Planning approvals / processes

$10,000

Regulatory processes in relation to waste management, power and planning approvals.Site designLandscaping

$15,000

Estimate to provide some green corridors and separate users, paths and other minor improvements.Provision of facilities (lighting, water, toilets, power, dump, rubbish, information signage)

$100,000

Provide a safe environment within a town based area.


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Picnic Point
We recommend that this site continues to be managed as a day use rest area. This is an appealing site in its current format with suitable facilities to cater for day visitors and local recreational users. TRC does not consider that there would be economic or yield benefits to the Shire from developing this as a formal free camping site, and we believe that the site’s natural amenity could be degraded through camping activity at the site. There would also likely be adverse impacts on local caravan park businesses and potentially increased servicing costs to ratepayers.
Minimal costs given the site is currently used as a day visitor site and is in reasonable condition.Should a proposed facility be operated by the Council, a cost benefit analysis would be required to determine value for money for the community. This would need to be informed by reliable direct research into the actual expenditure from RV Visitors to the shire and length of stay / visitor patterns for RV overnight stops.
Warragul township
Warragul could benefit from RV travellers stopping (with flow on benefits of longer day stops / return visitation). The priority action to encourage this would be to develop and promote a visitor information site / information board accompanied by long vehicle parking areas (4 – 6 parking sites), with good (easy walking / pedestrian) access to shopping district / cultural facilities. Ideally this would be near the entrance to the town to avoid further congestion or long vehicles going into the centre of town purely for the purposes of gaining
information. The current “Goods Shed’ is an example of an ideal location.
Collaboration Across Gippsland
Discussions with colleagues in other parts of Gippsland including Wellington Shire and South Gippsland have highlighted that there is interest across the  wider region in taking a strategic approach to catering for RV tourism. An imminent update of the Gippsland Destination Management Plan, and funding to the Latrobe Valley associated with mine closures could present opportunities to work in collaboration to achieve greater outcomes. Importantly, a significant part
of the RV market is provided through the Sydney Melbourne Touring Route. This is important to East Gippsland and Wellington Shires in addition to Baw Baw.
Costs would involve the provision of long vehicle parking places (already asphalted in most car parks), and visitor information boards.Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201712Cost category	Indicative cost	Comments
estimate
Directional and orientation signage to site$2,000

Improve signs from the highway to the location

Fire regulation compliance

$50,000

This has a high degree of uncertainty to the figure and needs further assessment.Ongoing management, patrolling and maintenance$50,000 per annum

Inclusive of patrolling costs, waste management etc.


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

Recommended actions and infrastructure priorities
The following table summarises proposed actions arising from consultation and planning within the Baw Baw Shire.
Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201713Theme

Location

Action

1. Signage and info

Cross-shire

1.1 Promote comprehensive, up to date, appealing information to visitors in the trip planning stages through media - online, social media, advertising.

Cross-shire

1.2	Regional products should be clearly mapped and promoted at major visitor sites, visitor information sites, and through online visitor information sources.
1.3	Packaging of regional products into itineraries will provide touring visitors the opportunity to understand the product and experience offer and increase overnight visitation – potentially advertised through industry and blog sites.
Cross-shire

1.4 Implementation of remaining recommendations as outlined in the Tourism Victoria Baw Baw Shire Signage review and continuing to take a visitor centric approach to the provision of signs.

2. Hero experience

Walhalla

2.1 Secure the Walhalla Department of Education site to support the community’s solution for expanding Walhalla’s RV visitor capacity in a safe and sustainable location. This will enable Walhalla Board of Management to expand the township’s RV capacity and implement appropriate management of RV activity. It will increase economic outcomes and visitor satisfaction.

Walhalla

2.2 Once secured and alternative camping sites are available, actively regulate unsafe and damaging free camping in Walhalla and utilise the dump point at Rawson.

3. Supporting experienceCross-shire

3.1 Promote Rawson RV Dump station (currently under-utilised) and Rawson – Erica – Walhalla route through the Shire.

Cross-shire

3.2 Implement priority projects for each ‘cluster’ of villages and locations to strengthen hero and supporting experiences. Continue to monitor for opportunities on the southern side of the highway.

Yarragon

3.3 Yarragon Village: RV Overnight stop site – if a suitable site can be secured and converted to a RV Rest Stop or commercial caravan park, an Expression of Interest process (or similar) could identify the preferred option for developing and managing the site to build on current visitation and facilities.


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Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201714Theme

Location

Action

Warragul

3.4 Warragul township: develop / promote a visitor information site and long vehicle parking areas, easily accessible to visitor information site and shopping district.

Drouin

3.5 Picnic Point to be maintained as a day use rest area.

Drouin

3.6 Resolve uncertainty relating to Glen Cromie Caravan Park operating requirements. Recognising that this is an important part of the RV visitor offering within the Shire, it would be helpful if a resolution was found that encouraged the Park’s continued operation as a holiday park and day visit area.

4. Industry development

Cross-shire

4.1 Work with local leaders to create a regional “Tourism leadership group” – such as a forum generating regular input and action. Representatives from each of the ‘clusters’ would ensure they are actively involved in growing RV tourism and relevant decision making / information sharing with the local industry and stakeholders.

Cross-shire

4.2 Undertake a comprehensive product audit within Baw Baw Shire (and neighbouring Shires if cooperation can be arranged). This will assist with identifying the region’s important experiences, facilities, strengths and opportunities. It can inform future planning and industry development initiatives, and visitor information.

Cross-shire

4.3 Collaboration across Gippsland – work with neighbouring Shires and land managers to take a cross-jurisdictional approach to RV tourism, DMP and regional funding opportunities.

5. Regulation

Cross-shire

5.1 Identify constraints on growth of private sector operations including regulatory burden and capital costs associated with regulatory requirements. Identify actions that could ease this burden, encourage private sector growth without compromising safety and environmental legal requirements. This will require cross-council coordination with input from relevant Victorian government Departments, and relevant stakeholders (local industry and peak representative groups, such as Victorian Parks and CMCA).

Cross-shire

5.2 Identify and implement a consistent response to unauthorised RV camping in other locations across Baw Baw Shire.

Cross-shire

5.3 Adopt and promote criteria for assessing RV facility proposals, encouraging consistency in approach and stakeholder understanding of decision making criteria.


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

RV Infrastructure Recommendations: short – medium term
Additional Long Vehicle parking spaces
The following table provides a starting point for the addition of longer vehicle parking bays.
*NB the number of spaces recommended are conservative suggestions. TRC Tourism recommends that these be implemented as a starting point. Local monitoring should be undertaken to identify usage as RV visitation grows over time, and increase parking options if necessary. It is likely that once wiki websites such as Wiki Camps show these sites, demand will increase for their use.Visitor Information display shelters could be provided for visitors in RV’s using long vehicle parking areas.Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201715Location	Number of	Indicative cost	Comment spaces*Warragul town center4 – 6

$7680-$11,520

Based on $120/square metre, does not include signage

Yarragon3$5,760Additional sites to current long vehicle parking sites.Noojee

3

$5,760

Allocation of existing sites to be converted to RV long vehicle parking. Refer to Case Study of options and potential economic impact in Appendix 3.Rawson3$5,760To be located in close proximity to dump pointErica

3

$5,760

To be located to encourage visitation of the township, OR to take advantage of day use facilities (shelter, BBQ, toilets, bubblers) at the site at the entrance Erica Caravan ParkNeerim South3$5,760Parking sites to be located convenient to dump point and to encourage town visitation


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

Criteria for assessing Proposed RV FacilitiesWhile this plan has identified priority projects to enhance the RV visitor experience and grow RV visitation to the Shire, there will be additional projects proposed by local stakeholders and groups as momentum within the region grows. It is not possible to forecast future requests for RV facilities and infrastructure, and TRC proposes that the Baw Baw Shire adopt a set of Criteria to assist with assessment of proposals. This will provide a transparent overview of how each proposal will be assessed. The following criteria are proposed to be used in conjunction with all local and State planning, business regulation and environmental management requirements.Criteria to consider in Council in relation to proposals for new RV tourism facilities:
Impact on community
îIs there community support for the development? Including residents, businesses, land managers / service providers?
Will the proposed RV parking / accommodation site impact on existing use of community facilities such as sporting grounds, open space and recreation assets, residential amenity and peaceful enjoyment?
Is the proposal likely to result in over-use of community facilities (toilets, parking, rubbish bins) without additional management resources available to ensure  public safety and sustainability?
Will RV parking clash with regular events (how frequently are they held? How will this be communicated with RV campers? How will campers be made to move on if necessary?)
îîNew RV facilities / areas funded by the Shire should not unfairly compete with existing businessesîNew RV facilities should only be located on sites that can support RV activity without degradation to the site’s valuesImpact on existing businessesRV activity should not displace local / community valuesî
î
Does the proposal comply with Victoria’s Competitive Neutrality policy?
Is there an existing business that is likely to be negatively impacted by the introduction of a free camping site / RV dump?
Do existing local businesses have facilities that visitors could utilize instead of developing new facilities? (e.g. pay per use of dump?). Do existing businesses allow casual use of their facilities?
Will the proposed RV facility support local businesses - generate more expenditure within the local area, create interest in stopping and spending more time in-region?
A diversity of camping and RV experiences should be provided across the Shire / regionîAll camping and RV settings should be high quality and managed appropriately to the settingîThe safety of campers, community and environment is paramount.Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201716


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

□ Will the proposed area work for through-Shire traffic or regional touring routes, or dilute messages about touring routes?
Maximising use of existing assets
îWill the proposed facilities address a gap in existing assets? Consider within Baw Baw Shire and neighbouring areas.
Will the proposed facilities meet a demand that is currently greater than supply, or reduce the use of existing assets?
Does the need align with a greater need of an existing market or is it an emerging market that needs a broader consideration?
îîManagement of sites
□ Does the Council have sufficient resources to manage the site, or a partnership with local business group to manage the site?
For consideration - recommended rules / guidelines for any free camping:
î
î
î
Duration limits – 24 - 48 hours maximum
What services will be provided, and at what cost?
Is there an existing dump station or facilities that could be used instead (free of charge or fee-for-service basis)?
Is the local community driving the proposal and committed to its management?
îBaw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201717


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

Case Study: Potential Noojee RV Stop – options for location and possible benefits
In order to expand Baw Baw Shire’s current RV offering, Baw Baw Shire has identified three potential sites for the development of RV overnight stops: the Campground near the river, and the old Tennis Courts site. The potential sites are pictured below.
TRC would recommend that the sites are assessed according to the criteria in order to ensure they are suitable and will meet the needs of both Council and visitors, as well as the Noojee community. In terms of potential economic impact, the following provides an estimate of the potential benefits that could accrue from the establishment of an RV Overnight stop in Noojee:*Assumes power and sewerage connections are readily available on site. Indicative costs only for the case study.Please note: Due to a lack of reliable, locally relevant data, the scenarios above are based on hypothetical occupancy rates, length of stay, and expenditure. TRC has used a 48hr stop as it is a standard maximum length of stay at many RV Stops. The expenditure of $100 per RV is based on self-reported expenditure by RV visitors at the Heyfield RV Stop case study (Appendix 2). It may not be a reliable estimate of expenditure in the Noojee RV Stop. Visitor research at the local / regional level could better inform these
Scenarios with regards to length of stay and likely expenditure.
Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201718SCENARIO	Number of parking	RV nights per year (estimate,	Possible expenditure	Direct expenditure	Likely Cost of spots (capacity)	annual average)	(based on $100/RV and	generated annually	Implementing the
2-night stays)	Sites*
Potential Scenario 1 (High to Medium Occupancy)

6

1512 RV Nights / year Note: Calculated on full
occupancy (6 RVs 7 days / week) for 20 weeks and 50% occupancy (3 RVs 3 days / week) for 32 weeks
1512 RV Nights averaging
$50 per night. (assumes a 2-night stay with $100 per stay)

$75,600	$30,000

Potential Scenario 2 (Medium to Low Occupancy)

6

612 RV nights per year
Note: Calculated on average of 50% occupancy for 20 weeks and weekends only for 32 weeks at 50%.
612 RVs RV Nights averaging $50 per night (assumes a 2-night stay with $100 per stay).

$30,600	$30,000


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

Tourism Signage Observations
Across the Shire there is a lack of directional signage, ‘reassurance’ signage and signage to visitor sites including camp sites and rest areas. There is also a lack of visitor-oriented information and signage highlighting regional attractions and visitor opportunities, as distinct from regulatory / purely directional signage.
Existing and new RV facilities will require prominent signage and promotion.
Baw Baw Shire has identified priority visitor information sites at the Gippsland Arts Centre and the Goods Shed site in Warragul. Each of these sites is undergoing redevelopment with one requirement that they will offer visitor information when completed. The Goods Shed site is accessible to visitors, close to Warragul town centre, and represents a great opportunity to provide visitor information.Tourism Signage
In reviewing the Tourism Signage Plan developed by Baw Baw Shire in conjunction with Tourism Victoria, we believe it is a practical and thorough Plan which would greatly improve the visitor experience and support local towns, we recommend the shire proceed to implement the recommendations.
Information on visitor opportunities around the Baw Baw Shire should also be
made available and kept up to date at Walhalla – as a major opportunity to reach visitors to the region and inform them of other opportunities within the Shire.
Visitor Information
There is a need for more in-Shire visitor information. Traditional Visitor Information Centres are a somewhat dated concept. Many destinations are recognising that the traditional business model of a shop-front style Visitor Information Centre with fulltime staff providing visitor information and local
booking service is outdated.
Whilst we recognise a need for accurate visitor information within the destination, this plan does not recommend the establishment of a traditional VIC within Baw Baw Shire. A more contemporary and cost-effective approach would see technology such as touch screens, permanent signage / maps, and  potentially ‘pop up’ visitor information officers (volunteer or employed) who can be on site to assist visitors in peak visitor times.Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201719


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

Concluding comments
There is significant opportunity for Baw Baw Shire to grow its RV visitation. There are many visitors passing through the Shire already and, through the provision of compelling visitor information and appropriate facilities, it is likely that many of them can be encouraged to stop, stay longer and return.
Using set criteria for assessing proposed RV facilities will assist Council to take a consistent approach to decision making and communication with stakeholders.More broadly, this plan strongly recommends that local tourism industry leadership be fostered. This can generate local or ‘cluster’ level activity resulting in new tourism opportunities. A comprehensive audit of tourism products, services and experiences will provide a solid foundation for the Baw Baw Shire in progressing the tourism offering for RV and other sectors.Over time, the Shire can continually improve its offer to the visitor – by improving hero experiences and the supporting regional experiences. Focusing efforts in identified RV destination ‘clusters’ will deliver a strategic approach to ensure
investment in RV tourism generates the best outcomes for visitors and the local community and businesses.
Improving visitor information online and in-region will assist with visitors planning their visit, as will ensuring the RV opportunities within the Shire are complementary to those in neighbouring Shires. The upcoming update of the Gippsland Destination Management Plan will be a further opportunity to coordinate the region’s priorities for the RV sector. There are some site-specific opportunities that can be investigated or acted upon in the short to medium term.Commercial caravan park operators should not be unfairly disadvantaged by the establishment of any new free or low-cost RV stops. However, there may be opportunities to develop low cost RV stops to cater for a broader audience, particularly RV travellers who do not like traditional caravan park accommodation options. Experiences from other regions indicate that there is value from encouraging this sector of the market to stay as indicated in the Heyfield RV Rest
Stop case study.
Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201720


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

Appendix 1: The current visitor market, the RV market and trendsRV Market
Recreational Vehicles and size of the market in Australia
Recreational Vehicles (RVs) can be either towable (caravans, camper trailers) or motorized (camper vans and motor homes). There are numerous sub-categories of each of these RV groups.
îDomestic and International visitors generated 49.7 million nights in caravan parks and camping grounds around Australia, contributing AU$8.6 billion of visitor expenditure to the economy.
11 million overnight caravan and camping trips (domestic and international) were undertaken throughout Australia in 2015 – a 7% increase from 2014.
îCaravan and Camping State of Industry 2017 states:The RV industry (manufacturing and sales), and associated tourism activity and expenditure, are a significant contributor to the Australian economy. The Caravan and Camping Association of Australia reports the following points to highlight the significance of the sector:îThere were 21,841 Recreational Vehicles manufactured in Australia, the second largest year for manufacturing in the last 37 years.
There were 51.6 million nights and 11.7 overnight trips by domestic caravan and campers.
There were 4.9 million nights and 335,167 visitors from International markets who caravanned or camped.
An estimated $1.8 billion of revenue was generated by Cabins, Powered sites and Unpowered sites.
îîThe total value of the caravanning and camping industry to the Australian economy annually is an estimated $19.02 billion.
Approximately 3,500 caravan and camping industry businesses directly supply product to consumers, covering the entire supply chain from manufacturers  to suppliers, retailers, repairers and accommodation providers.
The caravanning and camping industry has 53,000 direct employees in Australia.
A total of 22,711 recreational vehicles (towable and motorised) were manufactured in 2015, representing a significant 6.6% increase from production outputs in 2014 – the highest production levels in 37 years.
A caravan or campervan is manufactured every five minutes in the working week in Australia.
586,585 recreational vehicles (RVs) were registered across the country,
comprising of 58,375 campervans and 528,210 caravans – an increase of 4.5%.
îîîIBIS World Research Caravan Parks and Camping Grounds in Australia (February 2017) report found that from 2012 – 2017 annual growth in revenue was at 1.7%. The report highlighted industry threats and opportunities as: intense competition from alternative accommodation providers (such as Airbnb and serviced apartments) has constrained industry growth, while lower petrol prices have increased the affordability of caravan and camping travel. It also predicted that while the aging population will boost industry revenue growth, increasing competition from alternative accommodation services will limit growth. It is
unlikely the impacts of these factors be experienced evenly across destinations.
îîîîBaw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201721


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

Recent independent or peer-reviewed studies on expenditure / economic benefits from different categories of camping to destinations are not readily available. The Caravan, RV & Accommodation Industry of Australia commissioned research into the economic benefits associated with camping, including spending patterns of commercial and non-commercial campers (BDO 2013). They reported significantly higher expenditure per location ($576 compared to $213), per day (excluding accommodation cost - $73 spent by commercial camper compared to $53 non-commercial camper) and higher propensity to spend on complementary goods and services at a destination. The conclusions included:îExcluding accommodation costs commercial campers spend more than
2.7 times more at each location than non-commercial campers.
Excluding accommodation commercial campers create $5.4b of economic activity per annum.
Non-commercial campers spend 2 9 % of their time in commercial caravan parks.
Commercial campers spend less than 1 5 % of their time in non- commercial camping areas.
îîîThe publicly accessible analysis does not correlate demographic characteristics with expenditure or extend to longitudinal study of whether, for example, younger non-commercial campers translate into commercial campers, when
they are in a different stage of life.
Source: Caravan Industry Association Australia, State of Industry 2017.Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201722


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What do RV travellers need?
Fundamentally, RV travellers require similar facilities as other visitors, with the addition of accessible, safe and appealing accommodation options that meet the needs of their RV.
RV Friendly Towns
The RV Friendly Towns (RVFT) Initiative recognises towns that meet the needs of, and welcome, RV travellers. To become recognised as an RVFT, towns are assessed for their demonstration of meeting a variety of criteria including:
As a generalization, all visitors require safe and accessible destinations. They require information on activities and attractions, and these must be enticing and interesting enough to make the journey (or a stop along the way) compelling. A destination needs to stand out in a crowded marketplace, engage visitors and motivate them to book and travel. In addition to accessibility and basic safety requirements, visitors require access to the goods, services and infrastructure to support their visit. While dining options, organised experiences (tours, attractions etc), natural areas etc may not be fundamental requirements for travellers, they add to the appeal of a destination and influence a visitor’s length of stay, satisfaction with the experience, propensity to return / recommend it to
others.
î
î
î
î
î
î
A 24-hour medical service or pharmacy
A mechanic or service centre that can offer basic vehicle repairs Access to a visitor information centre and a town map
Access to potable water and a dump point
Long-term parking available close to the town centre at a reasonable rate RV Friendly Town sign beside main entry routes into the town
RV Friendly Towns, Baw Baw Shire and surrounds:
The following map (taken from the Caravan and Motorhome Club of Australia site http://www.cmca.net.au/) shows the geographical spread of RV Friendly certified towns in the vicinity of the Baw Baw Shire. Yarragon, Heyfield, Rosedale, Maffra and Sale are identified as well as a Café in Mirboo North and
the town of Yarram.
For RV travellers, specific needs include safe vehicle access, clear way-finding (maps, directional signage), parking spaces (powered / unpowered), waste management facilities (water, rubbish, sewage dump points), access to potable water for refilling, long and short-term parking, clear understanding of re-fuelling options, provision of food, drink and other consumables. They may require access to vehicle repair services.There are different ‘tribes’ of RV users, characterized by their level of self- sufficiency, interest in social interaction / seclusion, mix of accommodation choices (freedom / commercial camping), etc.Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201723


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Gippsland
Current visitor markets
Gippsland Tourism Demand data 2015 (Tourism Research Australia) indicated the following:
Top three overnight visitor origins for Gippsland:î
î
î
Melbourne 592,000 Other Victoria 425,000
Other NSW (unspecified number)
International visitors to Gippsland are primarily from the UK, Germany and USA. This differs slightly from data specifically for the Baw Baw Shire, which notes the top international markets as New Zealand, UK and Germany.“Holiday” and “visiting friends and relatives” (VFR) are the two primary reasons for visiting Gippsland for domestic day, overnight and international visitors to Gippsland. Baw Baw specific data indicates that more domestic overnight and international visitors come to Baw Baw to “Visit friends or relatives” with “holiday”
travel the second most cited reason. Domestic day visitors to Baw Baw are closely split, with slightly more coming for holiday than VFR.
Victoria
In the year ending March 2017, Victoria’s tourism industry recorded visitor expenditure of $24.7 billion (growth of 9.6%), including 7.8% growth in international overnight expenditure, to $7.3 billion. Domestic overnight visitation to Melbourne increased 8.8% (to 8.8 million visitors), and domestic overnight visitation to regional Victoria grew 5.2% (to 14.5 million visitors). Domestic overnight expenditure in Victoria is greatest by those visiting for holiday ($5,597 million or 54% of domestic overnight expenditure), VFR ($2.266 or 22% of domestic overnight expenditure).
Visitors almost exclusively reach Gippsland by driving, and the main activities undertaken by domestic visitors fall into the categories of “food and wine” and “nature based”. Overnight domestic visitors to Gippsland also participated in “cultural and heritage” activities. International visitor activities while within Gippsland are not known, however international visitors to Gippsland participated in “food and wine”, “nature based” and “cultural and heritage” activities while in
Australia.
Expenditure by domestic visitors grew by 7.4% for day trips, 21% for interstate visitors and 6.6% for intrastate visitation.Victoria’s tourism expenditure grew more significantly than the average Australian growth.Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201724


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

Intrastate visitation and expenditure are far more significant to Gippsland than interstate visitation and expenditure.Baw Baw-specific data shows that ‘home of friend or relative’ is the most significant accommodation type within the Shire in both international (31,000 nights) and domestic (181,000 nights) overnight visitor markets.Tourism Victoria’s 2014 Gippsland profile reported that in 2013-14:îEighty-six per cent of overnight visitors to Gippsland were from the intrastate market, followed by 11% from interstate and 3% from the international market.
Seventy-five per cent of visitor nights in the Gippsland region were from intrastate, followed by 13% from the international market.
The largest source market of international overnight visitors to Gippsland for the two years ending December 2014 was Europe including the United Kingdom. The UK accounted for 18% of international overnight visitors to the region, with Germany accounting for 16% and the remainder of Europe 23%. The next largest source markets were North America (12%) and New Zealand (11%).
Tourism Victoria noted that between 2010 – 2014, domestic overnight visitation to Gippsland increased at an annual rate of 1%, compared to an average of 5.9% annual increase for regional Victoria.
îîBoth international and domestic visitors’ top three accommodation options include caravan / camping, highlighting the significance and appeal of this style of accommodation to visitors to the region.îTOP THREE ACCOMMODATION (VISITORS '000)Domestic Visitor ExpenditureîDomestic overnight expenditure in Gippsland in the year ending December 2014 was estimated to be $550 million, with visitors spending on average $117 per night and $348 per visitor.
Domestic daytrip visitors are estimated to have spent $251 million in Gippsland in the year ending December 2014, spending on average $100 per visitor.
Seasonality – Tourism Victoria’s Gippsland Market Profile showed that
visitation peaked in Autumn (32%) followed by summer (31%) with Spring (21%) and Winter (16%) drawing fewer visitors.
îîBaw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201725INTERNATIONAL	DOMESTIC OVERNIGHTCaravan/Camping

Friends or relative’s property

14554Friends or relative’s property

Caravan/Camping

13263Hotel or similar

Hotel or similar

13141Visitor nights by origin (intrastate/interstate) ('000)

Intrastate

2,550

Interstate

720

Destination expenditure by origin (intrastate/interstate) ($m)

Intrastate

224

Interstate

58


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

Baw Baw
Baw Baw specific Tourism Statistics (source: Baw Baw Local Government Area Profile 2015, Tourism Research Australia)
Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201726Visitors to Baw Baw (S)

International

Domestic OvernightDomestic DayTotal

Reason (visitors '000)HolidayNp66245npVisiting friends or relatives277241320BusinessNpnpnpnpOtherNpnpnpnpTravel party type (visitors '000)

Unaccompanied344-47Couplenp35-npFamily groupnp34-npFriends/relatives travelling togethernp42-npAccommodation (nights '000)

Hotel or similarnpnp-npHome of friend or relative31181-212Commercial camping/caravan parknpnp-npBackpackernpnp-npOthernp108-np


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

Appendix 2: Heyfield RV Rest Stop Case Study
Heyfield in Wellington Shire, Gippsland, offers visitors with motorhomes or caravans a free rest stop, located within the township (2-minute walking distance to local shops)1.
Facilities at the site include:î
î
î
Shady trees
Men’s and women’s toilets Dump point
Visitors are permitted a free stay for up to 48 hours.The site has a Visitor Information signage shelter, and an ‘honesty box’ donation system for any visitors wanting to contribute to the site’s management. The honest box receives around $1200 - $1400 p.a. in donations.The Heyfield Traders and Tourism Association also run a small survey of those visiting the site. They estimate that the town receives expenditure of approx. $100 per RV. Exact visitor numbers are not known, but conservatively estimated at 30 –
40 RVs per month for 9 months of the year (excluding winter months).
Visitors to the site report coming for different reasons – some for specific events, or an in-region holiday. Some are travelling through and taking an alternative route to the main highway. Many find the site via Wikicamps.1 Visit Heyfield Region http://www.visitheyfield.com.au/explore/accommodation/item/heyfield-rv-rest-stopBaw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201727


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Positive feedback from visitors includes that they really enjoy that the site is within walking distance to the shops and local amenities.îThe site is managed by the Heyfield Traders and Tourism Association, the Association lodged a planning permit with the Wellington Shire Council to establish the site.
Heyfield does not have a commercially operated caravan park, and the RV Rest Stop is not directly competing with a private business. Prior to establishing the Rest Stop site, the Heyfield Traders and Tourism Association consulted with surrounding commercial caravan parks who felt that the site would not detract from their business.
The Heyfield Traders and Tourism Association have a committee of volunteers who maintain the Rest Stop site, including cleaning the toilet block and providing a point of contact for visitors to the site.
Heyfield has been recognised as an RV Friendly Town, by the CMCA.
Other details:îîA local Committee of Management manage the Gordon Street Reserves, with a small amount of funding from Wellington Shire to fund maintenance of 4 ovals throughout the year, including the one adjacent to the RV Rest Stop.îNo funding is allocated by the Shire for the specific purpose of managing the RV rest Stop.îîBaw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201728


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Appendix 3: Potential Noojee RV Stop – options for locations
Possible RV Stop sites in Noojee as identified by Baw Baw Council:
1.Camping ground near river already managed by Council2.Old Tennis Courts site DELWP land (Council is not COM)Baw Baw | Recreation Vehicle and tourism signage –| Final Report | 20 November 201729


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

12.    Safe and Sustainable Environments

Nil Reports

 

 

 


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

13.    Organisational Excellence

13.1    Quarterly Performance Report - Q2 2017/18

Leader Strategy and Innovation  

Directorate:  Chief Executive Officer

 

Ward:         

 

Appendix:     3 attachments

       

 

purpose

To provide Council with the Quarterly Performance Report.

REcommendation

That Council receives and notes the Quarterly Performance report for Quarter 2 2017/18.  

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·        A quarterly performance report is prepared at the end of each quarter of the financial year and it briefs Council and the Community on Council’s progress towards its strategic objectives as set out in the Council Plan 2017 – 2021.

·        This quarterly performance report is made up of the following reports:

Ø  Progress on the Initiatives contained in the Council Plan for the 2017/18 year (Council Plan report)

Ø  Key Performance Indicators including the statutory Local Government Performance Reporting Framework (LGPRF) measures (KPI report)

Ø  Financial report, including income statement, capital works statement, balance sheet and cash flow statement.

·        Targets included for KPIs are based on the average of last year’s annual result or where a specific target exists in the Council Plan. These will be refined as our understanding of performance range improves over time.

·        Baw Baw Shire Council have recently joined the LGPRF Technical Working Group (TWG), comprising of Primary users from various selected Councils across Victoria, peak bodies and Local Government Victoria staff.  A total of five meetings to cover all the LGPRF measures will occur over December 2017 and the first quarter of 2018. The first meeting was held in the LGV offices in Melbourne on 12th December 2017.  Four attendees represented BBSC at this workshop to discuss the performance measures around Roads, Statutory Planning and Waste where a series of recommendations were formulated for consideration as part of the broader review.  The next meeting is scheduled for the 13th February with a focus on the Finance and Sustainable Capacity indicators.

Council Plan actions:

·    A total of 39 Initiatives for 2017/18 are included in the Council Plan Report

·    33 of the Initiatives are In Progress, two are completed, two are ongoing and two are not yet started.

Community Satisfaction Survey

·    BBSC are participating in the Annual Community Satisfaction Survey, being conducted by JWS Research.  The survey will commence on the first of February and will continue for approximately three weeks. A media release has been issued informing residents of the upcoming survey.  The independent research conducting the survey work on behalf of JWS Research is National Field Services.  The survey will involve 400 interviews conducted amongst a sample of residents.

·    The finalised results are expected to be received by June 2018.

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

·    The Quarterly performance report provides an overview of Councils performance with respect to the Council Plan and the LGPRF.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

·    Officers continue to action items in the council plan which assist to improve and benefit council’s responsible environmental outcomes.

FINANCIAL IMPACT

·    There are no financial impacts in the preparation of this report.

Consultation

·    The Quarterly Performance Report will be available to the Community via the published minutes of Council meeting on the Baw Baw Shire Council website.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This Quarterly report assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Strategic Objective 4: Organisational Excellence

4.2       Positive leadership, advocacy and decision making around shared goals.

4.3       Providing community benefit by effectively managing council’s resources and finances.

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This quarterly report has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

·        Council is required to report on its performance. The quarterly performance report meets this requirement.

POLICY IMPACTS

·    Risk Management Policy – Council addresses its obligation and commitments to ensure it delivers the Council’s key objectives;

·    This report meets the requirements of the audit committee charter and was tabled at the February 2018 meeting;

·    This report meets the requirements of Local Government Performance Reporting Framework as per the Local Government Act.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 

 


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baw Baw Shire Council

 

Quarterly City Plan

Period:           01/10/17 - 31/12/17

Quarter:                             December

 

V3.2.1


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Transition aged and disability support services in line with Federal policy direction and funding

1.1.1.6 Support eligible residents to transition to the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) transition for the Inner Gippsland region, including Baw Baw Shire Council, commenced 1 October 2017.

 

It is expected that approximately 260 of Council’s clients will test their eligibility for the NDIS over the first six months of the Scheme. At present 131 of Council’s clients have engaged with the NDIS and are in various stages of the eligibility and planning process.

 

Council will be funded to continue to provide services to most existing clients who enter the NDIS up until 30 September 2018. After this Council’s funding will be transferred to the National Disability Insurance Authority and clients will be able to transfer to other service providers. Some clients may transition to other service providers earlier depending on their grant funding arrangements.

 

Council resolved on 24 May 2017 that it will not register to be a provider under the NDIS, however will support clients in their transition to the new Scheme and other service providers.

Community Services

In Progress

01/07/2017

31/03/2019

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Develop a coordinated approach to community hubs and precincts in the municipality

1.1.2.1 Develop a strategy for community hubs and precincts in the municipality

A workshop has been conducted with Councillor 's to frame their thoughts on Community Hubs. The internal steering committee has been established.

Infrastructure Planning Programs and Waste

In Progress

01/07/2017

21/12/2018


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Sustainable management of the shire’s rural character and agricultural land

1.2.1.1 Finalise the Rural Land Use Review for Council decision

The peer review has been completed this quarter and the Rural Land Use Strategy will be updated as per its recommendations. It is anticipated that a report will be presented to Council in March 2018.

Sustainable Development

In Progress

01/07/2015

30/06/2018


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Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Determine youth service provision to support youth in Baw Baw

1.3.1.1 Commence a review of the current Baw Baw Shire Youth Charter

Officers have developed a program for the development of a new Youth Charter (a policy and strategy). As part of the engagement in association with this project a youth event/summit is to be held on 19 April 2018. The local youth community will be consulted at this event to provide their perspectives on the development of the Youth Charter. A strong network of youth service providers will also participate in and support this event/summit and this project.

Sustainable Development

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Build a vibrant community of arts, culture and events

1.3.2.1 Prepare an Arts, Culture & Events Strategy

The Art's Culture and Events Strategic Plan 2017 - 2021, which takes community feedback into consideration, was presented to Council for consideration and was adopted in November 2017.

Arts, Culture and Events

Completed

01/07/2016

30/06/2018

1.3.2.2 Redevelop the West Gippsland Art Centre into a regional performing arts facility

Major component of works completed include:

- Auditorium ceiling closed

- Closing up of southern foyer has begun

- all windows for level 2 installed

- new practical completion date of the 18th of July 2018

Infrastructure Planning Programs and Waste

In Progress

01/07/2015

18/07/2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Support the community to enhance their health and wellbeing

1.3.3.1 Develop a new Municipal Public Health & Wellbeing Plan

The Municipal Public Health & Wellbeing Plan, which takes community and stakeholder feedback into consideration, was presented to Council for consideration and adopted at the 13 December 2017 Council meeting.

 

A hard copy has been provided to the DHHS Secretary. All statutory requirements have been fulfilled.

Sustainable Development

Completed

01/07/2016

30/11/2018


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Support the community to enhance their health and wellbeing

1.3.3.2 Continue to work with the Central West Gippsland Primary Care Partnership to support food security in Baw Baw Shire

Central West Gippsland Primary Care Partnership's newly appointed Food Security Officer has commenced. working among Council staff one day per week, as is the agreement between organisations.

 

The Food security action plan is being finalised.

Sustainable Development

Ongoing

30/06/2017

30/06/2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Work with the Aboriginal community to develop an action plan based on the Local Government Aboriginal Partnership Project

1.3.4.2 Continue developing the partnership between Council and the local Aboriginal community around key events and activities

Participation by Aboriginal members of Council’s Advisory Committees continues to be strong.

 

Discussions are underway to plan for community events in Reconciliation Week and NAIDOC Week.

 

Following a well-attended meeting in December between Kurnai Nations and Council officers, a request has been made for a presentation to Council in March 2018.

Sustainable Development

Ongoing

30/06/2017

30/06/2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Enhance opportunities for recreation and, leisure participation as the community grows

1.3.5.3 Develop the second oval at Western Park

Turf establishment is still continuing. Electrical and lighting works are underway and the project nearing practical completion.

Infrastructure Planning Programs and Waste

In Progress

01/07/2016

31/03/2018

1.3.5.4 Develop a new Recreation Strategy 2017-2027

Consultant commenced in Quarter 2 2017/18. The first round of consultation has been completed. A Council workshop is planned for February 2018. A draft document and final community consultation

is to be carried out prior to the final report being

presented to Council in June 2018.

Assets and Recreation

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018

 

Actions	Progress Comments	Business Unit	Status	Start Date	Comp Date


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

STRATEGY:       Plan, manage and delivering on the Shire’s sport and recreation infrastructure needs through implementation of master plans, and developing new plans for

growth areas

1.3.6.4 Implement Master Plans for Warragul and Drouin Civic Parks

Completed Warragul Civic Park upgrade October 2017 and Council has endorsed a major park upgrade for Civic Park Drouin, detailed design and costing to be finalized by June 2018 with a view to deliver project in 2018/19 or 2019/20 financial year.

Urban Operations

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018

 

Actions Progress Comments Business Unit Status Start Date	Comp Date

 

STRATEGY:	Enhancing how Council works with the community to improve social inclusion, access and equity


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Enhancing how Council works with the community to improve social inclusion, access and equity

1.3.7.2 Investigate Opportunities for improving accessibility to Council services for all community members

Work has continued on investigating the potential opportunities to improve accessibility to Council services for the Community across many areas of Council.

Strategic and Community Planning have been consulting broadly with the community in an effort to hear from under-represented groups and to consider accessibility in the work they undertake. Information Technology and Customer Service have recently introduced a "Live-Chat" feature through the BBSC Website.

Communications have undertaken an audit around Level AA Accessibility for the BBSC Website and are currently reviewing quotations to conduct updates.

Rural Access has continued to work in the ‘Good Access is Good Business’ space, developing and strengthening relationships with businesses in the region to ensure they provide access to goods and services for all members of the community.

Council hosted the first Disability Expo to be held in the region, providing all members of the community the opportunity to access tools and information from over 40 organisations to assist with their understanding of the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

Engineering have been actively working around disabled access parking bays throughout the shire which has included conducting audits, reviewing locations for new bays, and implementing infrastructure changes. This has seen upgrades in Yarragon, Trafalgar and Drouin. Warragul works

are scheduled for the 2017/18 Financial Year.

Community Information and Advocacy

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Facilitate the small towns and rural communities’ community planning program

1.4.1.2 Commence a review of the Community Planning process with small towns and rural communities

Community Planning is an important process that will be reviewed in March/April in terms of program.

Sustainable Development

Not Started

01/03/2018

30/06/2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Warragul and Drouin CBD improvement works

1.4.2.1 Continued Warragul CBD streetscape improvement works

Mason Street and Palmerston Street roundabout works, as well as Mason Street and Albert Street roundabouts works have been completed with some minor defects to be remedied by the contractor.

The detailed design works for streetscape upgrade at Palmerston Street and Smith Street have been completed. The construction contract for these was awarded in December 2017. Works are scheduled to commence in the second week

of February 2018.

Infrastructure Planning Programs and Waste

In Progress

03/07/2017

29/06/2018


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Support business investment and diversification of the Baw Baw economy

2.1.1.6 Develop and implement a new Economic Development Strategy for the Shire

A draft Economic Development discussion paper has been prepared to assist in identifying the key areas for action that the new Economic Development Strategy should focus on. As such, a draft of the Economic Development Strategy Actions has been prepared and presented to Council's Business Advisory Board in December 2017. This feedback will assist in refining the actions that will be proposed within the formal draft.

Business and Economic Development

In Progress

01/07/2016

30/06/2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Develop a destination tourism campaign

2.1.2.6 Develop a Visit Baw Baw marketing strategy

A brief was prepared outlining the objectives of the project. Following a request for quote process a consultant has been appointed. The project inception meeting is being held in early January 2018.

Business and Economic Development

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Work with the community and stakeholders to manage the Shire’s environment and biodiversity values

3.1.1.1 Finalise and commence the implementation of Council’s new Environment Sustainability Strategy and four-year action plan

Following the adoption of the Environmental Sustainability Policy in June 2017, the new Environmental Sustainability Strategy has been drafted with refinements and will be presented to Council in February 2018 to seek support to undertake public consultation.

Sustainable Development

In Progress

01/07/2016

30/06/2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Recognise the value of urban street and significant trees

3.1.2.2 Manage and encourage the use of Council’s Baw Baw Significant Tree Register

The mapping has been finalised for the geographic registration of Drouin significant trees on the Baw Baw Significant Tree Register, and final checking and edits will be completed in January 2018.

 

Community consultation (28-day) will commence in February in relation the Significant Tree Register. The Drouin significant trees the first to be added to the Register. There has also been an enquiry from Rokeby community for similar assets to be identified and included on the register.

Sustainable Development

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Work to reduce waste and increase diversion from landfill

3.1.3.1 Continued implementation of Baw Baw’s Waste Management Strategy and action plan

Recycling within Walhalla has been introduced and commenced in November 2017.

Infrastructure Planning Programs and Waste

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018

 

Actions Progress Comments Business Unit Status Start Date	Comp Date

 

STRATEGY:	Continue to improve Council's sustainability performance


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Continue to improve Council's sustainability performance

3.1.4.1 Continue to monitor and improve Council's energy and water-use efficiency and reduce its carbon footprint

During the period the energy consumption for 10 largest sites has decreased by 3%; the public lighting energy consumption has increased by 3% due to increase in number of lighting (220); the fuel consumption has increased from 111 KL to 131KL and the overall greenhouse gas emissions has increased by 2%.

Sustainable Development

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Manage and maintain the Shire's local roads network to improve its overall quality and safety

3.2.1.1 Develop and Implement the Road Management Plan

The Road Management Plan (version 6.0) was adopted by Council in May 2017. Implementation of the Plan will be delivered through the program of works contained in the 5-year Routine Road Maintenance Contract.

Assets and Recreation

In Progress

01/07/2016

30/05/2021

3.2.1.8 Manage the Shire’s roads management contracts and programs

The Routine Road Maintenance Services Contract has been reviewed with contract sum adjusted for 2017/18 including the 2017 Public Roads register. The current Minor Works Contract expires 30 June 2018 and is currently being reviewed for the reissue of a new request for tender.

Key achievements to date are:- 60 maintenance projects to the value of $979,000 let this financial year.

Infrastructure capital works tenders have been issued for the gravel roads resheet, sealed road resealing works and major pavement repairs projects with these works due to commence mid

January 2018 and be completed by March 2018.

Assets and Recreation

In Progress

30/06/2017

30/06/2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Effectively plan and manage car parking demands across the Shire

3.2.2.2 Commence implementing the recommendations of town centre car parking strategies for Warragul , Drouin, Trafalgar and Yarragon

Investigation of options for parking options within the Warragul CBD has commenced. The initial investigation works and feasibility study is expected to be complete in March 2018.

Infrastructure Planning Programs and Waste

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018

 

Actions Progress Comments Business Unit Status Start Date	Comp Date

 

STRATEGY:	Improve the condition, safety and accessibility of the shire's footpaths and trails


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Improve the condition, safety and accessibility of the shire's footpaths and trails

3.2.3.1 Implementing Council's New Footpath Program

Construction of new footpaths at 11 locations across the Shire is progressing as scheduled. Works were completed at:

- Chapmans Road, Trafalgar, Princess Street & Dundee Streets, Warragul.

Additional works at the Civic Park Warragul were also completed.

Works are underway or continue at Dodemaides Road - Trafalgar, Main Road - Walhalla and Edinburgh St - Warragul.

Design works continue for Settlement Road -

Drouin.

Infrastructure Planning Programs and Waste

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018

3.2.3.2 Implementing Council’s Footpath Renewal program

Footpath renewal works have been completed at multiple sites across the Shire. Works continue to progress and are expected to complete by February 2018.

Infrastructure Planning Programs and Waste

In Progress

01/07/2017

28/02/2018


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Lead the community in being child safe

3.3.1.2 Implementation of Child Safety Standards Action Plan

To date, the Action Plan is at progressing well with:

o      19 actions fully complete

o      17 actions commenced or in progress

o      3 actions not yet started

o      2 actions not going ahead (as they are no longer considered to be appropriate)

Of particular note is the work undertaken towards Standard 4: “Screening, supervision, training and other human resources practices that reduce the risk of child abuse by new and existing personnel”. This work has been very resource intensive, and includes:

o      A full audit of Council roles in relation to their requirements for Working with Children Checks (WWCCs)

o      Audit of volunteer database and implementation of mandatory WWCCs for designated roles

o      The development of a tailored training package on Child Safety Standards in Baw Baw Shire. To date, 25 training sessions have been

conducted with 324 staff now trained

Community Services

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Help the community and council to be better placed to adapt to and build resilience to climate change and other extreme events

3.4.2.4 Participate in the Environmental Sustainable Development (ESD) Subdivisions Policy – Proof of Concept for regional Victoria project

Baw Baw Shire Council in partnership with AECOM (consultant) successfully delivered a stakeholder workshop to developers, surveyors, subdivision designers, engineers, planners and councillors as part of the ESD Regional Subdivisions project (in collaboration with 7 other regional Victorian Councils) .

 

The workshop also presented an overview on the project in relation to best practice ESD principles in regional Victoria, case studies and the

cost-benefit of incorporating best-practice ESD into the planning scheme. All 8 partner councils have now completed their stakeholder workshops. Refinements to the cost-benefit analysis model based on selected ESD case studies is now being completed.

 

Project recommendations will be received in May.

Sustainable Development

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Continuously improve Council’s services, systems and business processes

4.1.1.2 Best Value Review for Council's Communications service.

The Communications team are scheduled to commence work on the best value review in February 2018.

Community Information and Advocacy

Not Started

01/01/2018

30/06/2018

4.1.1.14 Best Value Review for Council's Statutory Planning service.

The Statutory Planning Unit are undertaking a Best Value Service Review focussed on improvements to the service delivery to our community. A draft report has been prepared which focusses on the delivery of planning permit service.

 

Notwithstanding the work completed to date on the Best Value Review, there has been improvement in the delivery of this service over the last quarter.

Sustainable Development

In Progress

01/07/2015

31/12/2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Improve Council’s customer service and experience of using council’s services

4.1.2.2 Develop and implement Council’s Customer Service Strategy

The Customer Excellence Strategy is underway with the Customer Service Charter and Complaints Policy in the final stages of review and development in preparation for presentation to Council prior to the end of this financial year.

There is preparation underway to engage all new employees to Baw Baw Shire Council in Customer Service Training and experience some time in the service centre as part of the induction to Council. This training will be rolled out across council for all existing Officers over the next 12 months.

Live Chat commenced in December and at this stage there is two officers that are using this medium to engage with our community. This will increase to all customer service officers within the next six months. The next quarterly report will

include activity statistics on the service.

Community Information and Advocacy

In Progress

01/07/2016

30/06/2021

 

Actions Progress Comments Business Unit Status Start Date	Comp Date

 

STRATEGY:	Achieve clear, open and effective two-way communication and engagement between Council and the community


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Achieve clear, open and effective two-way communication and engagement between Council and the community

4.1.3.6 Commence implementation of a Digital Roadmap for Council, with the aim of online becoming the primary channel of engagement with Council

Digital services have been assessed for feasibility for use within the organisation. This activity has been completed and officers are now in the process of collating the results from this component and determining the next stage of the project.

Council Business

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Advocacy and grant seeking, building partnerships and relationships to achieve community needs

4.2.1.1 Advocacy and grant seeking, building partnerships and relationships in relation to identified community needs to support a growing community

A budget bid document has been submitted consideration to both State and Federal Governments, areas highlighted include investment in kindergartens, community hubs, priority road projects and managing growth.

A state funding application seeking funds for a new early years centre co-located at the Warragul primary school was successful with Council receiving funding of $650k to go towards the project, additionally, a further submission seeking

Federal funding was submitted in Quarter Two.

Community Information and Advocacy

In Progress

01/07/2016

30/06/2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Work and engage with the community to develop a shared vision and goals for the future of the shire

4.2.2.2 Develop a program in relation to the review and renewal of the municipal community plan and vision

Council are currently reviewing the Exposure Draft of the Local Government Bill and assessing the proposed changes to Local Government Act and how the changes will impact the future requirements in relation to the Municipal Community Plan and Vision. Once this review is complete in February, a program in relation to the review of the existing plan will be prepared to ensure compliance with any changes as set out in the Local Government Act.

Community Information and Advocacy

In Progress

01/12/2017

30/06/2021


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Sustainably manage Council's financial position

4.3.1.3 Prepare the Annual Budget 2018/19 and Strategic Resource Plan

The 2018/19 Budget is currently being compiled with Councillor workshops scheduled for March 2018 this includes the following key deliverables – Long Term Financial Plan and Long Term Infrastructure Plan, Council Plan & Budget as well as the completion of the 2017/18 mid-year budget review process.

Financial Services

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018

4.3.1.11 Develop, deliver and monitor the Long Term Financial Plan

The 2018/19 Budget is currently being compiled with Councillor workshops scheduled for March 2018 this includes the following key deliverables – Long Term Financial Plan and Long Term Infrastructure Plan, Council Plan & Budget as well as the completion of the 2017/18 mid-year budget review process.

Financial Services

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Implement an internal program aimed at organisation culture transformation

4.4.1.1 Develop and implement an organisation culture program

The executive team have now met and conducted a workshop to discuss, evaluate and map next steps with the organisations values. The next step is to schedule a workshop with the Executive, Managers and Coordinators and the Cultural working group in regards to the behaviours that underpin each value. This workshop will upskill the attendees to conduct workshops across the organization to create and refine those behaviours that will underpin our values.

Organisation Development

In Progress

01/07/2017

30/06/2018

 

 

Actions

Progress Comments

Business Unit

Status

Start Date

Comp Date

STRATEGY:       Supporting gender equality in the workplace and in the community

4.4.2.1 Ongoing implementation of the Council's Gender Equity Plan

The plan identified the prevention of violence against women as a key focus. This is to be achieved through a combination of workforce education, internal policy development, bystander training, community events, the formation of a community action group and the completion of the organisations first gender equality audit.

To date, Council has implemented several measures to improve gender equity across the organisation. In total there were 45 action items in the agreed plan. Of these actions, 28 have been

completed.

Organisation Development

In Progress

01/07/2016

30/06/2018


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 


 


 


 


 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

13.2    Mid Year Budget Review

Finance Manager  

Directorate:  Corporate and Community Services

 

Ward:         

 

Appendix:    

      

 

purpose

To present Council with the findings following completion of the Mid-Year Budget Review and the financial position for the six months to 31 December 2017.

REcommendation

1.   That Council notes the Financial Report for the six months ended 31 December 2017, notes the Mid-Year Budget Review that identifies forecast year end cash savings of $1.13 million.

 

2.   That Council approve for funding from the Accumulated Cash Surplus the following initiatives:

 

a)   $0.47 million to secure the Warragul Primary School - Early Learning Centre kindergarten project; and

 

b)   $0.12 million for Glen Cromie Caravan Park Fire Abatement works as per Council decision on 8 November 2017; and

 

c)   $0.025 million for the site demolition at 61 Albert Street, Civic Park, Warragul; and

 

d)   $0.07 million for the roof renewal of Civic Place, Warragul and

 

e)   $0.125 million for additional screening at Western Oval, Warragul; and

 

f)    $0.04 million for the removal and replacement of the turf wicket at the main Western Park Oval with a synthetic pitch; and

 

g)   $0.025 million for the footpath in Walhalla between southern carpark and Walhalla Railway station

 

3.   That Council refers the following initiatives for officer research and consideration as part of the 2018/19 Annual Budget Process:

 

a)   Footpath in Walhalla from Rotunda to Long Tunnel Extension Mine; and

 

b)   Footpath in Noojee on Mt Baw Baw Tourist Road between Noojee Hotel and Noojee Heritage Centre; and

 

c)   Shared pathway from Erica to Rawson; and

 

d)   Footpaths – Tarwin Street, Warragul construction of footpaths to infill gaps; and

 

e)   Installation of “public” art developed by the Rawson Community around Rawson Crater Lake; and

 

f)    Noojee Streetscape improvements (seating, art, footpath repairs, signage); and

 

g)   Options for the purchase of the school site at Yarragon

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

Mid-Year Budget Review

·    The 2017/2018 Mid-Year Budget Review provides Council with the opportunity to review its operations since the adoption of the 2017/18 Budget and consider any necessary adjustments to reflect the latest forecast financial position.

 

·    During December 2017 and January 2018 officers were required to review their detailed operating and capital budgets to identify income and expenditure for the 12 months of the financial year. 

 

·    The Mid-Year Review has identified forecasted cash savings of $1.13 million comprising $0.93 million operating and $0.2 million capital.

 

·    The operating budget savings of $0.93 million mainly comprises:

 

o Rates & charges $0.58 million - Supplementary rates have increased due to rates and waste charges for new properties and/or extensions to dwellings.  The increase in supplementary rates (pro rata) followed the completion of an audit of property values by Council’s contract valuer.

o Operating Grants $0.55 million – forecast increase mainly due to additional revenue from the Financial Assistance Grant as a result of reinstatement of CPI.

o User Fees & Statutory Fees (0.15 million) – forecast reduction that includes lower than anticipated income received at Council’s transfer stations.

o Other Income $0.18 million – minor increases across a number of services within Council. 

o Employee costs $0.11 million – forecast savings in salaries due a number of staff vacancies across Council.

o Materials, services and contracts (non-salary expenses) ($0.34 million) – over expenditure primarily due to urgent repair works on Edgars Road and additional legal advice for the continued dispute with the former roads contractor.

 

 

·    The capital budget savings of $0.20 million mainly comprises:

 

o Footpath program (100% delivery )                $0.17 million

o Ellinbank Reserve – Oval Light Upgrade       $0.02 million

o Kydd Park Jindivick Cricket Clubrooms         $0.01 million

 

Cash Surplus

 

The enclosed Financial Report identifies a surplus of $14.12 million that comprises cash and non-cash items. The surplus is based on Accounting Standards and does not reflect the cash available to Council for future purposes.

 

The above accounting surplus of $14.12 million is converted to an accumulated cash surplus to reflects the available cash after receipt of all revenue and payment of all expenses.

 

The following table represents the movement of $14.12 million Operating Surplus (accounting surplus) that is then converted to an accumulated cash surplus of $4.47 million after adding back the impact of non-cash items (such as depreciation) and deducting cash items that are not included to the operating surplus (mainly capital expenses).

 

The table also identifies the cash savings of $1.13 million that is reflected as an increase in the accumulated cash surplus from $3.34 million (Budget) to $4.47 million.

 

 

Budget 2017/18

$ millions

Forecast 2017/18

$ millions

Variance

 

$ millions

Operating Surplus – Financial Report

(excl. Financial Asst Grant in Reserves)

$18.33m

$14.12m

($4.21m)

Add back non-cash items (mainly depreciation & non-cash income)

 

$5.43m

$10.45m

$5.02m

Less non-operating cash items (mainly capital)

 

($28.00m)

($27.68m)

$0.32m

Equals Cash Deficit 17/18

 

($4.24m)

(3.11m)

$1.13m

Plus B/forward Surplus

 

$7.58m

$7.58m

-

Equals Accumulated Cash Surplus

$3.34m

$4.47m

$1.13m

 

 

Addition Projects for Consideration

 

The following projects are identified for funding consideration.

 

1.   Warragul Primary School - Early Learning Centre

 

1.   The 2017/18 Budget allocated $1.48 million towards a new Early Learning Centre comprising of $0.98 million grants and $0.50 Council contribution.

 

2.   Council has been successful in securing funding of $0.65 million from the Children’s Facilities Capital Program for the new Early Year’s kindergarten facility on the Warragul Primary School site.

 

3.   Since the adopted budget the project cost increased to $2.41 million with proposed funding as follows:

o $0.65 million grant funding from the State

o $0.78 million from the Developer Contribution Plan (DCP) to be brought forward from 2022

o $0.98 million from Council. $0.50 million already allocated in the 2017/18 budget, leaving a remaining $0.47 required to be allocated at the mid-year review.

 

4.   A funding application is still pending with the Commonwealth for this project which if successful would reduce the contribution required from Council.

 

5.   Council approval is sought to ensure authorisation of the grant agreement during February 2018.

 

2.   Glen Cromie Caravan Park - Fire Abatement Works

 

·    On the 8 November 2017 Council resolved to fund the required fire abatement works at Glen Cromie Caravan, estimated to be at $0.12 million from the 2017/18 Capital Works budget.

 

3.   Total site demolition at 61 Albert Street, Civic Park, Warragul building for creation of a carpark

 

·    Estimated demolition cost of $0.025 million. Design and construction of carpark to be referred to the 2018/19 budget.

 

4.   Roof Renewal Civic Place Warragul

·    Bringing forward planned renewal of existing roof on southern section of Civic Place including flashing and gutters at an estimated cost of $0.07 million.

 

5.   Additional screening for the Western Oval, Warragul

 

·    Estimated total cost of $0.125 million to supply and install 140 metres of additional screenings to the west and east sides inclusive of post footings.

 

6.   Removal and replacement of the turf wicket at the main Western Park Oval with a synthetic pitch

 

·    Estimated total coast of $0.040 million subject to seasonal turf requirement. Timing of the project to be finalised in consultation with the Committee of Management and Clubs.

 

7.   Footpath in Walhalla between southern carpark and Walhalla Railway station

·    Estimated total cost of $0.025 million for construction of asphalt footpath 1.5m wide 30 lin m as an addition to the 2017/18 current year programmed works at Main Road, Walhalla.

 

 

 

Allocation of $0.88 additional funding for the abovementioned six projects would reduce the available surplus by a total of as follows:

 

 

·    Accumulated Cash Surplus (per above)         $4.47 million

 

o Less additional projects for consideration ($0.88 million)

 

 

Equals Revised Cash Surplus                           $3.59 million

 

The revised cash surplus forms a component of the draft 2018/19 budget for future consideration.

 

The following projects require further investigation and scoping by Council officers for consideration in the draft 2018/19 budget:

 

8.   Footpath in Walhalla from Rotunda to Long Tunnel Extension Mine

9.   Footpath in Noojee on Mt Baw Baw Tourist Road between Noojee Hotel and Noojee Heritage Centre

10. Shared pathway from Erica to Rawson

11. Footpath in Walhalla between southern carpark and Walhalla Railway station

12. Footpaths – Tarwin Street, Warragul construction of footpaths to infill gaps

13. Install of “public” art developed by the Rawson Community around Rawson Crater Lake

14. Noojee Streetscape improvements (seating, art, footpath repairs, signage)

15. Options for the purchase of the school site at Yarragon

 

Financial Report for the six months ended 31 December 2017

 

The following analysis provides a commentary for the enclosed Financial Report and the Operating Surplus (accounting) of $14.12 million.

 

·    The enclosed Financial Report – Income Statement for the 6 months ended 31 December 2017 identifies Council’s financial position to date.  The Income Statement reports a year to date surplus of $5.97 million that is a $2.58 million variance when compared to the amended budget (adopted budget plus carryover).

·    The full year forecast position for the Income Statement reports a surplus of $14.12 million that represents an unfavourable variance of $8.69 million when compared to the amended budget (adopted budget plus carryover).  The unfavourable variance is mainly due to the Financial Assistance Grants income received in advance in the 2016/17 financial year plus the write down of expected income from non-monetary assets.

·    The Capital Works Statement reports year to date expenditure of $9.43 million that is a $5.60 million favourable variance when compared to the amended budget (adopted budget plus carryover). 

·    The full year forecast position for Capital Works reports expenditure as $35.67 million that is $0.20 million below budget representing project savings.

·    The Cash Flow Statement for Council reports forecast cash at the end of the financial year of $24.07 million that represents an increase in cash of $9.19 million. The favorable variance mainly relates to higher than expected cash balance at the commencement of the financial year due to earlier than expected receipt of Financial Assistance Grants funding, higher than expected cash held for carry forward capital projects as well as the $1.13 million cash savings, as reported at the Mid-Year Budget Review above.

 

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

·        The Financial Report provides financial information to the community regarding Council’s financial position. 

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

·    There is no environmental impact.

FINANCIAL IMPACT

·    Council’s financial results are reflected in the Financial Report.

·    Financial performance ratios are included in the Performance Statement and highlight Council’s ongoing financial sustainability

Consultation

·    There is no consultation required.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

The Annual Financial Report and Performance Statement assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Organisational Excellence

“Providing community benefit by effectively managing councils resources and finances” and “Sustainably manage Council’s financial position”.

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This Financial Report has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

·        The Local Government (Planning and Reporting) Regulations 2014 applies to the preparation of both the Performance Statement and the Financial Report.

POLICY IMPACTS

·        Nil

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

13.3    Debt Collection Services Contract

Team Leader Revenue Services

Directorate:  Corporate and Community Services

 

Ward:         

 

Appendix:    

       

 

purpose

To advise of intention to appoint MidState Credit Collect under Procurement Australia Contract 1911/0631 and subsequent Baw Baw Shire Council Expression of Interest 21830Cr.

REcommendation

That Council engages MidState Credit Collect to 30 November 2019 with a 2 x 1 year option to extend as per PA Contract 1911/0631.    

 

 

Key Issues

In April 2017, Baw Baw Shire Council opted to be included in the Procurement Australia Tender for Debt Collection Services. This process was run throughout the year with the final panel being endorsed and advised to participating Councils in October 2017. The conclusion of the previous contract was in November 2017.

The process of an Expression of Interest for the provision of services for Debt Collection has not been undertaken for several years and a key outcome this process seeks to achieve is improved efficiency and transparencies.

The Procurement Australia Tender was a preferred option for sourcing these services due to the timing of contract ending and the ability to engage at the beginning of the process. MAV also have a Debt Services Contract but this is not due for renewal until Feb 2019. Both contracts generally offer the same panel of suppliers.   

It was decided that Baw Baw Shire should go to an Expression of Interest to test the market for suppliers based on the Procurement Australia panel recommendations. No full tender process was required as this had already been undertaken by BBSC as participants in the original Procurement Australia process.

 

Three suppliers (including the current provider) were invited to present to representatives of BBSC including Revenue, Compliance and Home Based Support Services.  These departments are users of debt recovery services currently across multiple suppliers. A written EOI document was also submitted.

 

The aim of this process was to engage a best practice supplier not only for Revenue Services but to consolidate other departments debt practices as well. (Building and Emergency Management were also involved in discussions as well as the previously mentioned Compliance and Home Based Support Services).  

 

The preferred supplier MidState Credit Collect were selected by the panel of BBSC representatives based on their approach to an “Early Intervention” model of debt collection with less focus on legal prosecutions. Legal action is costly (for the ratepayer as this is on charged) and earlier more personable solutions are preferred. 

The “Early Intervention” model proposed by MidState Credit Collect encompasses at least 5 points of personal contact (phone, SMS, email, field call, letters) prior to any legal proceedings. This helps build customer satisfaction and ultimately reduces costs incurred by the debtor. It also has proven to have more success in collecting Revenue.

The benefits of changing supplier include enhanced online options for management of accounts both for Council and Council debtors. Enhanced and extra payment options are being made available to account holders including a new phone app which empowers debtors to make payments or enquiries at time suitable to them. Reporting, payments and invoicing are real time and more efficient than the current monthly process.

A further benefit to the MidState Credit Collect proposal is they are regionally based (Traralgon) and part of their proposal is to meet monthly to monitor debt collection across the organisation in a timelier manner. Midstate Credit Collect will endeavour to engage with stakeholders from across the organisation, build relationships and adapt to specific needs of various departments.

Positive references were contacted and confirmed from both other local councils.

Going forward, after collating the feedback from BBSC representatives at the presentations, notes taken and reference checks, it is now recommended that the transition begin from the current debt recovery provider ML&C to the preferred supplier MidState Credit Collect on resolution of Council. This may take some weeks, however the teams will work to ensure the transition is as smooth as possible with the best possible outcomes for both Council and the debtors involved.

This process whilst challenging will also present the opportunity to review the full suite of accounts across the organisation and ensure that from now on they will be managed consistently and equitably. It is projected that by implementing an early intervention model, establishing a closer working relationship and prospectively less legal action, there will also be a significant saving to the ratepayer who ultimately incurs the fees.

TRIPLEBOTTOMLINE IMPLICATIONS

Financial Impact

As mentioned previously costs incurred via legal debt recovery processes are incurred by the ratepayer via the rates payment system. They are however levied in the first instance to Baw Baw Shire Council.

Costs incurred for previous three years:

Financial Year

Costs Incurred

2015/2016

$92,880

2016/2017

$218,191

2017/2018

$63,510*

*Year to date

Environmental Impact

·        No environmental impact has been identified as part of this report.

Community Impact

By engaging an early intervention model of debt recovery consistently across the organisation it is envisaged that ultimately Council will not only gain efficiencies but will also enhance the customer experience.

Personalisation of processes with service level agreements will ensure that ratepayers and debtors will be treated fairly and consistently.

Customers will be subject to at least 5 attempts to personally contact them to discuss debt situations and engage in mutually agreeable payment arrangements, consider hardship policies and hopefully avoid legal proceedings.

Other Councils have reported increased levels of satisfaction from ratepayers with significant reduction of debt.

 

Consultation

Consultation has taken place with several departments across the organisation who utilize various debt recovery practices.

A workshop was held on 12 January 2018 in conjunction with the Business Improvement team to identify the best way forward to ensure consistent practices, ensuring that teams work together on the best outcome for both the organization and the debtor.

Representatives from the Revenue team attended a seminar on Financial Hardship facilitated by Uniting Care which has helped to shape the debt recovery process going forward as well as discussions with other relevant Councils on best practice.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This Valuation Review process assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Strategic Objective 4: Organisational Excellence

4.3       Providing community benefit by effectively managing council’s resources and finances.

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This Valuation Review process has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

This review has undertaken under the following legislative requirements:

·    Local Government Act 1989

·    Penalty Interest Act 1983

POLICY IMPACTS

This review has not identified any policy impacts.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 

 

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

14.    Notices of Motion

Nil Reports

 

 

 


15.    Committee and Delegates Reports


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

16.    Assembly of Councillors

16.1    Assembly of Councillors Report

Governance Advisor

Directorate:  Corporate and Community Services

 

Ward:          All

 

Appendix:     8 attachments

       

 

purpose

To present the written records of Assemblies of Councillors that have occurred.

REcommendation

That Council receives and notes the Assembly of Councillors records tabled for the period from Friday 8 December 2017 – Friday 9 February 2018

 

Key POINTS/Issues

The Local Government Act 1989 requires that the written record of an assembly of councillors be, as soon as practicable, reported at an ordinary meeting of the Council and incorporated into the minutes of that meeting.

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Baw-Baw-Logo-(White-Disc)

Assembly of Councillors Record

This record is required under s.80 of the Local Government Act 1989. An Assembly of Councillors is a defined term under s.76AA. This record must be completed at which matters are considered that are intended or likely to be the subject of a Council decision or the exercise of a delegated authority and which is either one of the following: a meeting of an advisory committee where at least one Councillor is present; or a planned or scheduled meeting that includes at least half the Councillors and at least one Council officer.

 

Meeting details

Date

23 January 2018

Time

 5.30 – 7.00pm

Location

Warragul Annexe 90 Smith St Warragul

Advisory Committee (if applicable)

Arts and Cultural Advisory Committee

 

 

 

 

In attendance

List all attendees present at the meeting including Councillors, Committee Members, Council Officers and others in attendance

Cr J O’Donnell

 

Kay Lancashire,

 

Dalene Salisbury,

 

Kathie Olden,

 

Sally Alsop,

 

Jayne Neilson

 

Karen Whitaker-Taylor

 

Rob Robson

 

Sue  Acheson (present between 6.00- 6.30pm)

 

Matters Considered

List all matters considered at the meeting

WGAC Redevelopment

ACAC presentation to Council

Acquisition proposal

 

 

Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Have any persons declared a conflict of interest to an item discussed? (Yes/No)   YES                                         

If yes, please complete:

Name of person making disclosure

 

Person left the room and remained outside whilst discussion taken place? (Yes/No) YES

Sue Acheson

re acquisition proposal Ms Acheson left the meeting at 6.30pm and did not return

Yes

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Baw-Baw-Logo-(White-Disc)

Assembly of Councillors Record

This record is required under s.80 of the Local Government Act 1989. An Assembly of Councillors is a defined term under s.76AA. This record must be completed at which matters are considered that are intended or likely to be the subject of a Council decision or the exercise of a delegated authority and which is either one of the following: a meeting of an advisory committee where at least one Councillor is present; or a planned or scheduled meeting that includes at least half the Councillors and at least one Council officer.

 

Meeting details

Date

4 January 2018

Time

 10:00am to 2:40pm

Location

Drouin Civic Offices

Advisory Committee (if applicable)

Confidential Councillor Briefing

 

 

 

In attendance

List all attendees present at the meeting including Councillors, Committee Members, Council Officers and others in attendance

Cr Gauci

Mark Kestigian

Chris Hargreaves

Cr Goss

Matthew Cripps

Scott Bryant

Cr Cook

Martin Hopley

David Brydson

Cr Jones

Cohen Van der Velde

Rob Robson

Cr Leaney

Peter Harris

Debbie Giles

Cr O’Donnell

Dominic Foenander

Shelley Smithers

Cr Wallace

Claudia Stow

Malcolm Lewis

Cr Kostos

Teck Ting

Linda Christy

Alison Leighton

Chris Carson

 

Mark Dupe

Shane Paynter

 

 

Matters Considered

List all matters considered at the meeting

Indoor Stadium Feasibility Study Consultation Feedback

Contractual Legal Matters

Update 121 Queen Street

Presentation: Baw Baw YMCA Community Impact Presentation

Update on the Arts Centre presentation

IT Demo

Debt Collection Tender

Rate Capping - Essential Services Commission Efficiency Factor (and verbal Valuations update)

Local Government Act Review

Analysis of the Protecting Integrity report into Central Goldfields

Policy Review Work Update

 

 

 

Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Have any persons declared a conflict of interest to an item discussed? (Yes/No)   NO                                           

If yes, please complete:

Name of person making disclosure

 

Person left the room and remained outside whilst discussion taken place? (Yes/No)

 

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Baw-Baw-Logo-(White-Disc)

Assembly of Councillors Record

This record is required under s.80 of the Local Government Act 1989. An Assembly of Councillors is a defined term under s.76AA. This record must be completed at which matters are considered that are intended or likely to be the subject of a Council decision or the exercise of a delegated authority and which is either one of the following: a meeting of an advisory committee where at least one Councillor is present; or a planned or scheduled meeting that includes at least half the Councillors and at least one Council officer.

 

Meeting details

Date

7 February 2018

Time

 11:30am to 3:57pm

Location

Drouin Civic Offices

Advisory Committee (if applicable)

Confidential Councillor Briefing

 

 

 

In attendance

List all attendees present at the meeting including Councillors, Committee Members, Council Officers and others in attendance

Cr Gauci

Mark Dupe

Alison Lisle

Cr Goss

Mark Kestigian

Tara Dennison

Cr Cook

Matthew Cripps

Patrick Dubuc

Cr Jones

Martin Hopley

Naomi Neville

Cr Leaney

Cohen Van der Velde

Leanne Khan

Cr O’Donnell

Peter Harris

Luke Cervi

Cr Wallace

Dominic Foenander

Jessie Ablett

Cr Kostos

Shekar Atla

Greg Hollis

Alison Leighton

Malcolm Lewis

Elizabeth Willems

John Darmody

Chris Quinn

 

 

Matters Considered

List all matters considered at the meeting

Recreational Vehicle and Tourism Signage Plan

Local Government Act Review

Debt Collection Tender

Multi Deck Car Park

Mid-Year Budget Review

Quarterly Reports Q2

Planning Application Princes Way Drouin

Planning Application Queen Street Warragul

Planning Application Drouin Golf Club

Planning Application Hazel Drive Warragul

Environmental Sustainability Strategy

Former Yarragon School Site

Sponsorship Applications

 

Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Have any persons declared a conflict of interest to an item discussed? (Yes/No)   NO

 

If yes, please complete:

Name of person making disclosure

 

Person left the room and remained outside whilst discussion taken place? (Yes/No)

 

 

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Baw-Baw-Logo-(White-Disc)

Assembly of Councillors Record

This record is required under s.80 of the Local Government Act 1989. An Assembly of Councillors is a defined term under s.76AA. This record must be completed at which matters are considered that are intended or likely to be the subject of a Council decision or the exercise of a delegated authority and which is either one of the following: a meeting of an advisory committee where at least one Councillor is present; or a planned or scheduled meeting that includes at least half the Councillors and at least one Council officer.

 

Meeting details

Date

Wednesday 13 December 2017

Time

3:30pm  - 4:30pm

Location

Trafalgar Chambers, Trafalgar Business Centre

Advisory Committee (if applicable)

Presentation to Council by DELWP  RE: Walhalla and Mount Baw Baw Focus.

 

 

 

In attendance

List all attendees present at the meeting including Councillors, Committee Members, Council Officers and others in attendance

Steve Chapel – DELWP

Cr Leaney

 

Andrew Stephens – DELWP

Matthew Cripps

 

Mark Dupe

Cr Power

 

David Dunstan

Cr O’Donnell

 

Martin Hopley

Krysten Evans

 

Alison Leighton

Peter Harris

 

Cr Gauci 

 

 

Cr Jones

 

 

Cr Wallace

 

 

 

Matters Considered

List all matters considered at the meeting

 Presentation by DELWP  focusing on a project that aims to develop a business case for a package of works / program of works in the Mount Baw Baw / Walhalla area.

 

Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Have any persons declared a conflict of interest to an item discussed? (Yes/No)   NO                                           

If yes, please complete:

Name of person making disclosure

 

Person left the room and remained outside whilst discussion taken place? (Yes/No)

 

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Baw-Baw-Logo-(White-Disc)

Assembly of Councillors Record

This record is required under s.80 of the Local Government Act 1989. An Assembly of Councillors is a defined term under s.76AA. This record must be completed at which matters are considered that are intended or likely to be the subject of a Council decision or the exercise of a delegated authority and which is either one of the following: a meeting of an advisory committee where at least one Councillor is present; or a planned or scheduled meeting that includes at least half the Councillors and at least one Council officer.

 

Meeting details

Date

Wednesday 13 December 2017

Time

3:00pm – 3:30pm

Location

Trafalgar Chambers, Trafalgar Business Centre

Advisory Committee (if applicable)

Community Briefing: Presentation on summer season from an emergency preparedness perspective

 

 

 

In attendance

List all attendees present at the meeting including Councillors, Committee Members, Council Officers and others in attendance

Tony Pinelli

Alison Leighton

Cr Wallace

Graeme Simons - Operations Officer D9

Cr Goss

Cr Jones

 

Cr Power

 

 

Cr O’Donnell

 

 

Cr Leaney

 

 

Matthew Cripps

 

 

Mark Dupe

 

 

Krysten Evans

 

 

Peter Harris

 

 

Matters Considered

List all matters considered at the meeting

Summer season – emergency preparedness perspective briefing to Councillors.

 

Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Have any persons declared a conflict of interest to an item discussed? (Yes/No)   NO                                           

If yes, please complete:

Name of person making disclosure

 

Person left the room and remained outside whilst discussion taken place? (Yes/No)

 

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 14 February 2018

 

 

Baw-Baw-Logo-(White-Disc)

Assembly of Councillors Record

This record is required under s.80 of the Local Government Act 1989. An Assembly of Councillors is a defined term under s.76AA. This record must be completed at which matters are considered that are intended or likely to be the subject of a Council decision or the exercise of a delegated authority and which is either one of the following: a meeting of an advisory committee where at least one Councillor is present; or a planned or scheduled meeting that includes at least half the Councillors and at least one Council officer.

 

Meeting details

Date

5th February 2018

Time

9.00am

Location

Trafalgar Chambers, Trafalgar Business Centre

Advisory Committee (if applicable)

Audit Committee Meeting

 

 

 

In attendance

List all attendees present at the meeting including Councillors, Committee Members, Council Officers and others in attendance

Cr J Gauci

Ms A Leighton 

Mr P Harris      

Cr D Goss

Mr C Van der Velde

Ms E Hollole      

Ms T Glab (Chair)

Mr M Cripps 

Ms T Dennison

Mr T Duff

Mr M Dupe 

Ms A Lisle

Mr D Ashmore

Mr M Hopley

Ms C Martin

Dr AJ Purcell

Mr M Lewis

Ms K Teasdale RSD Audit

 

 

Ms R Wrigglesworth DMG Audit

 

Matters Considered

List all matters considered at the meeting

Probity Questions

CEO Report

Internal Control - Procurement

External Audit by the Victorian Auditor General’s Office

Internal Audit Actions Update

Internal Audit Scope and Report

Internal Audit Plan

Audit Committee Workplan

 

Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Have any persons declared a conflict of interest to an item discussed? (Yes/No)   NO                                           

If yes, please complete:

Name of person making disclosure

 

Person left the room and remained outside whilst discussion taken place? (Yes/No)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17.    Mayoral Minute

 

18.    General Business