Agenda

 

 

 

                                                       Council

 

 

 

                                         25 October 2017

 

 

To be held on Wednesday, 25 October 2017

commencing at 5.30pm

in the Trafalgar Council Chambers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

www.bawbawshire.vic.gov.au

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

 

 

Our Vision

Happy, healthy people sharing prosperity and knowledge from living sustainably and in harmony with our rural identity, thriving villages, productive and inspiring landscapes.

Our Mission

Leaders in delivering quality, innovative and community focused services today that make a difference for tomorrow.

Core Values

Community focused

Accessible, responsive (we’re here to help), can do attitude, communicative, empathetic.

Integrity

Equitable, honest, ethical, transparent.

Respect

Listening, compassionate, open minded, understanding, patient.

Pride

Caring, enthusiastic, inspiring, accountable.

Innovation

Creative, bold, challenging, flexible.

Collaboration

Partnering, building productive relationships, inclusive.

 

 

 

 


Agenda

 

1.        Opening and Recognition of Traditional Custodians. 5

2.        Reading of Affirmation and Prayer. 5

3.        Apologies. 5

4.        Civic Ceremonies. 5

5.        Confirmation of Previous Meeting Minutes. 5

6.        Councillors Declarations of Interest/Conflict of Interest 5

7.        Meeting Closed To The Public: Release of Information to the Public. 5

8.        Community Participation Time. 6

8.1     Questions on Notice. 6

8.2     Submissions. 6

9.        Petitions. 7

10.     Vibrant Communities. 8

10.1  Renaming of Telecom Track Walhalla. 8

10.2  Naming of unnamed reserve within Emberwood Estate Warragul 17

10.3  Statutory Planning Monthly Report - September 2017. 21

10.4  Drouin Golf Club Development Plan - Exhibition.. 30

10.5  Community Development Grants 2017/18. 286

10.6  Fire Hazard Risk Reduction Strategy - Fire Hazard Inspection Program 2017/18  290

11.     Thriving Economy. 317

12.     Safe and Sustainable Environments. 318

12.1  Domestic Animal Management Plan.. 318

12.2  Tender - Contract No. 21772CT Panel of contractors provision of weed control and bushland services. 372

12.3  PLA0139/16 - 3 Warraview Close, Warragul for the use of part of the land and outbuildings for the keeping of poultry and birds (domestic Animal Husbandry) 376

13.     Organisational Excellence. 400

13.1  Tender (21771CT) Recommendation Report - Waste Disposal Contract for Baw Baw Shire Council Garbage. 400

13.2  Annual Report 2016/17. 403

13.3  Meeting Procedure Local Law Review.. 587

13.4  Community Participation Time Policy. 650

14.     Notices of Motion.. 661

15.     Committee and Delegates Reports. 662

16.     Assembly of Councillors. 663

16.1  Assembly of Councillors Report 663

17.     Mayoral Minute. 672

18.     General Business. 672

 


 

1.      Opening and Recognition of Traditional Custodians

I acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land on which we are meeting and pay my respects to their Elders both past and present.

 

2.      Reading of Affirmation and Prayer

Cr Gauci read the Councillors affirmation, being, ‘We now pause to reflect upon the solemn responsibilities conferred on us by the Parliament of Victoria through the Local Government Act (1989). 

We acknowledge that it is the responsibility of local government to ensure the peace, order and good governance of our Shire. 

We are to be responsible and accountable to our community here in Baw Baw Shire through good governance and leadership. 

Almighty God,

Give wisdom and understanding to the members of this Baw Baw Shire Council.

In all our deliberations help each of us to listen carefully, perceive the best course of action have courage to pursue it and grace to accomplish it.

Amen

3.      Apologies 

4.      Civic Ceremonies

5.      Confirmation of Previous Meeting Minutes

6.      Councillors Declarations of Interest/Conflict of Interest

7.      Meeting Closed To The Public: Release of Information to the Public

There will be no Confidential Council Meeting.

 

 

 

 

8.      Community Participation Time

8.1       Questions on Notice

 

8.2       Submissions

Any community member is welcome to comment or ask questions on any of the officer reports listed in this agenda if it has not been part of another hearing process.

 

Submitters will be given up to 3 minutes to speak on their submission.

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

9.      Petitions

Nil Reports

 

 

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

10.    Vibrant Communities

10.1    Renaming of Telecom Track Walhalla

Business Systems Analyst

Directorate:  Corporate and Community Services

 

Ward:          East Ward

 

Appendix:     7 attachments

       

 

purpose

For Council to consider the renaming of a section of Telecom Track, off Main Road Walhalla as part of the ANZAC Commemorative Naming Project.

REcommendation

That Council renames Telecom Track from Main Road Walhalla to the Long Tunnel Mine buildings to ‘Spetts Track’.

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·    Councillors were briefed on this matter on 20 September 2017. The Place Names Advisory Committee is supportive of this initiative.

·    During the ANZAC centenary period (2014 to 18), the Victorian government is conducting the ANZAC Commemorative Naming Project in partnership with naming authorities, primarily councils. 

·      The project recognises the 100-year anniversary of the first ANZAC landings at Gallipoli in 1915. It commemorates a century of ANZAC tradition by acknowledging the men and women who have served in an operational capacity in the Australian and New Zealand Defence Forces and those in the community that have displayed the ANZAC spirit.

·    The project is an opportunity for the municipality to acknowledge and honour the wartime service and sacrifice of all our local military service people and locals who supported Australia's military cause.

·    Council received a submission proposing to rename Telecom Track off Main Road, Walhalla, to ‘Charles Spetts Track’ (Attachment 1). Charles Spetts was born in Walhalla, with the family being one of the very early residents arriving in 1869 and remaining until 1945. The family house “Spetts Cottage” is on Main Road, 200 metres before the current Telecom Track. Charles Spetts served in the 5th Battalion, 2nd Reinforcement Unit and was killed in action on the 7th August 1915 in Gallipoli, Turkey.

·    For any request to name, rename or change the boundaries of features, localities and roads within the municipality Council refers to the ‘Naming rules for places in Victoria, Statutory requirements for naming roads, features and localities – 2016 (naming rules)’. These guidelines, provided for in the Geographic Place Names Act 1998, are mandatory for naming authorities in Victoria. ‘Principle (H) Using Commemorative Names’ of the naming rules stipulate that only the surname of a person can be used in a road name and as such it is proposed to rename Telecom Track to ‘Spetts Track’ instead of the original proposal of ‘Charles Spetts Track’.

·    As part of this project it was identified that Councils source of spatial road data ‘VicMap Transport’ incorrectly showed Telecom Track to be north of the Long Tunnel Mine between Main Road and Mormon Town Track (Attachment 2). The correct alignment of this track is a sealed section from Main Road, south of the Long Tunnel Mine entrance to the mine buildings and continuing west from the mine carpark as a 4WD track to the Mormon Town Track. This alignment will be updated in VicMap Transport as part of the track renaming.

·    A site visit was conducted and for ease of identification it is proposed to rename Telecom Track from Main Road to the Long Tunnel Mine buildings to ‘Spetts Track’ and retain the name Telecom Track from the Long Tunnel Mine car park to the Mormon Town Track (Attachment 3 and 4).

·    The section of track proposed to be renamed is primarily within public land vested under the management control of the Walhalla Board of Management and a section of government road reserve managed by Council. The remainder of Telecom Track from the Long Tunnel Mine car park is located on Parks Victoria land.

·    As per the Naming Rules, by Council undertaking the renaming of this section of Telecom Track it does not imply or transfer responsibility for road maintenance to Council. Council is the road naming authority processing the renaming proposal only. Council assesses and determines a road’s status in accordance with the adopted public Road Register Policy and Procedure and if the road or section of road meets the requirements for “public use” under the Road Management Act 2004.

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

The proposal provides the community with a road name that enables them to connect with their ANZAC history.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

The proposal has no environmental impact.

FINANCIAL IMPACT

New road signage is to be installed after the road is renamed but is a minor cost.

Consultation

·    Councils Place Names Advisory Committee have reviewed the name proposal

·    Written permission for the use of the Spetts name was obtained from family descendants of Charles Spetts (Attachment 5)

·    Support was obtained from the Walhalla Board of Management (Attachment 6)

·    A Have Your Say poster was displayed in the Walhalla Post Office and allowed for 30 days of submissions

·    Support was obtained from the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning – Traralgon Office and Parks Victoria – Melbourne and Traralgon Offices

·    Wider community consultation occurred via Councils Have Your Say webpage on the 4 August 2017 and via an advertisement in the Warragul Gazette on the 25 July 2017. These allowed for 30 days of submissions in which one was received (Attachment 7).

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This place naming assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Strategic Objective 1: Vibrant Communities

1.1       Quality community focused services, facilities and infrastructure to support a growing community.

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This project has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

The guidelines for place naming in Victoria are provided for under Section 5 of Geographic Place Names Act 1998.

POLICY IMPACTS

This proposal has no policy impacts.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

 

10.2    Naming of unnamed reserve within Emberwood Estate Warragul

Business Systems Analyst

Directorate:  Corporate and Community Services

 

Ward:          Central Ward

 

Appendix:     4 attachments

       

 

purpose

For Council to consider the naming of an unnamed reserve within Emberwood Estate Warragul

 REcommendation

That Council names the unnamed reserve within Emberwood Estate, Warragul, (as attached) ‘Eric Roberts Reserve’  

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·    Councillors were briefed on this matter on 20 September 2017.

·    This proposal has the support of Council’s Place Names Advisory Committee.

·    Council has received a naming submission for a recently developed unnamed reserve off Emberwood Road Warragul (Attachment 1).

·    The proposed name of ‘E.G. Roberts Reserve’ or ‘Eric Gilbert Roberts Reserve’ were provided for the unnamed reserve. This would be named after Eric Roberts.  He farmed the land where the reserve is located. He also had significant achievements in the dairy industry over several years (Attachment 2 and 3).

·    For any request to name, rename or change the boundaries of features, localities and roads within the municipality a decision must be made against the ‘Naming rules for places in Victoria – Statutory requirements for naming roads, features and localities - 2016’. These rules outlined in the Geographic Place Names Act 1998, are mandatory for naming authorities in Victoria.

·    The names ‘E.G. Roberts Reserve’ and ‘Eric Gilbert Roberts Reserve’ do not meet ‘Principle (H) Using commemorative names’ of the Naming Rules as initials of a given name are not to be used and there is a preference to only use a first and surname in feature names.

·    Councils Place Names Advisory Committees have proposed the alternate name of ‘Eric Roberts Reserve’ which meets the Naming Rules.

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

The proposal provides an identity to an un-named reserve which will assist the residents and emergency services in this area.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

The proposal has no environmental impact.

FINANCIAL IMPACT

New reserve signage is to be installed after the reserve is named but is a minor cost. This will be met from existing allocations.

Consultation

·    Family descendants of Eric Roberts provided the naming submission and therefore have provided support for the use of his name.

·    Councils Place Names Advisory Committee reviewed the submission.

·    Wider community consultation occurred via Councils Have Your Say webpage on the 4 August 2017 and via an advertisement in the Warragul Gazette on the 25 July 2017. These allowed for 30 days of submissions in which one was received (Attachment 4).

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This place naming assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Strategic Objective 1: Vibrant Communities

1.1       Quality community focused services, facilities and infrastructure to support a growing community.

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This project has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

The guidelines for place naming in Victoria are provided for under Section 5 of Geographic Place Names Act 1998.

POLICY IMPACTS

This proposal has no policy impacts.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

 

10.3    Statutory Planning Monthly Report - September 2017

Manager Sustainable Development

Directorate:  Planning and Economic Development

 

Ward:          All

 

Appendix:     5 attachments

       

 

purpose

To provide Council with an update on Statutory Planning activities and decisions for the month of September 2017.

REcommendation

That Council receives and notes the report updating Council on the Statutory Planning activities and decisions for the month of September 2017.

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·    During the month of September 2017:

o 32 planning permit applications were received;

o 33 planning permit applications determined;

o 40 written planning advice were issued for the month;

o 14 plans of certification issued for plans of subdivision; and

o 12 statement of compliance were issued for plans of subdivision.

·    A total of 51.50% of the decisions were made within 60 days.

·    There were two (2) VCAT determinations in the period.

o PLA0349/15 – 109 Kelliher Road, Neerim South for the realignment of two existing lots.  The Council issued a notice of refusal to grant a permit.  The decision of the Responsible Authority was affirmed and no permit was issued by VCAT.

o PLA0279/14 – 173 Cazalys Road, Brandy Creek for 2 lot subdivision.  The applicant withdrew the application.

·    This reports provides an update of the following items:

o Statutory Planning Summary (Attachment 1)

o Planning Applications received to “Amend Planning Permit” (Attachment 2)

o Planning Applications received (Attachment 3)

o Planning Applications Determined (Attachment 4).

o Planning Applications to Amend Planning Permit determined (Attachment 5)

September PPARS report was not published at the time this report was completed.

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

This report will not result in any identified community impacts.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

This report will not result in any identified environmental impacts.

FINANCIAL IMPACT

The costs to be incurred at VCAT by legal representation, planning consultants and officer representing Council are included in the 2017/18 Planning and Economic Development budget.

Consultation

·    This report provides details of all planning permit applications and decisions that are required to be considered in accordance with the Baw Baw Planning Scheme and the Planning and Environment Act 1987.

·    Consultation occurs with the community as part of the planning process on applications where public advertising is required.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This activity assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Strategic Objective 1: Vibrant Communities

1.2 Managing Baw Baw’s growth and development.

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This report has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

There are no identified legal impacts noted in relation to the preparation of this report.

POLICY IMPACTS

There are no identified policy impacts noted in relation to the preparation of this report.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

 

10.4    Drouin Golf Club Development Plan - Exhibition

Coordinator Strategic and Community Planning

Directorate:  Planning and Economic Development

 

Ward:          West

 

Appendix:     13 attachments

       

 

purpose

For Council to consider public exhibition of the proposed Drouin Golf Club Development Plan.

REcommendation

That Council:

1.   Exhibits the proposed Drouin Golf Club Development Plan to gauge community views; and

2.   Requests officers present a report to Council following the exhibition period detailing the feedback provided by the community.

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·    The subject land is zoned Low Density Residential Zone (LDRZ) and a Development Plan Overlay Schedule 7 (DPO7) applies to the land.  It is a total of 52.98 hectares contained within 2 parcels of land.   

·    The subject site is zoned Low Density Residential Zone, a total of 154 lots is proposed.  The site abuts existing, subdivided and developed LDRZ land to the east and south.  The Overall Development Plan is provided at Attachment Six. 

·    The LDRZ requires minimum lot sizes, dependant on the existence of reticulated sewer.

o A 4000 square metre minimum is required for unsewered land.  This can be reduced to 2000 square metres in the event reticulated sewer is connected to all lots.  The subject land is proposed to be connected to reticulated sewer, therefore allowing lots to have a minimum lot size of 2000 square metres.

o Whilst this provides for the efficient development of residentially zoned land, it creates potential for conflict between existing low density residential lots, which are all at least 4000 square metres and the lots proposed for the subject site (minimum 2000 square metres).

·    A Development Plan must precede any planning permit for subdivision. Once the Development Plan is approved by Council, if a subdivision application is lodged in accordance with the Development Plan, then approval is generally granted.

·    There are no third-party rights to a subdivision application that follows an approved Development Plan (no public notice, no ability for appeals by neighbours). Thus, it is important to ensure that the outcomes sought, are dealt with during the Development Plan phase.

·    In the 1980s, Drouin Golf Club (DGC) purchased land abutting the golf course to the south. The intent was to construct an additional 18 holes on the newly purchased land.

·    On 22 May 1989, a Section 173 Agreement between the DGC and then Shire of Buln Buln was prepared, which created a positive obligation on the Golf Club to fully construct the additional 18 holes on Development Plan land.  Only 9 additional holes were constructed (27 overall)

·    In a letter from Council dated 1 March 2011 to the Golf Club, Council consented to the ending of the Agreement given zone provisions at that time protected the intent of the Agreement.

·    Various planning scheme amendments have considered the subject land in a broader, strategic sense as well as the more detailed issue of the interface with adjoining, existing residential properties.   Ultimately, Amendment C89 (part 2) dealt with the subject land.

·    Exhibition for C89 occurred in early 2016 and again attracted a number of objecting submissions relating to the interface between the DGC land and existing residential properties.

·    The intent of the development planning process is to address the issues relating to the interface with adjoining, existing residential properties. The approval of C89 introduced the DPO7.

·    A Panel Hearing was conducted in July 2016 and the panel was satisfied that the interface issues were satisfactorily addressed through the DPO7 mechanisms and could be dealt with in detail through the development plan process. 

·    Pre-lodgement discussions have been occurring since early 2017.  Some concerns were raised with respect to the above outstanding issues during the course of preliminary discussions in early to mid-2017.

·    Formal lodgement of Development Plan occurred on 15 August 2017.  The Development Plan is provided in Attachments One to Twelve.  The overall development Plan, including proposed lot design can be found in Attachment Six  

·    At this stage, there are two primary issues outstanding with the proposed Development Plan that do not satisfactorily address the requirements of Development Plan Overlay Schedule 7.  They are:

o Interface with adjoining residential properties; and

o Lack of unencumbered public open space proposed.

·    DPO7 seeks to specifically address this potential conflict through detailed requirements within the DPO7 itself, as set out above.  The lot design proposed, adjoining existing residential lots, has not minimised the number of new lots abutting existing lots.  Amendments to the lot design would address this.

·    Impact on yield will occur, but requirements of DPO7 should take precedence and importance considering history and Panel recommendations.  Amendments to the lot design would address interface concerns. 

·    A landscape buffer has been proposed along the interface, however, this does not fully address the interface issues at hand nor the requirements of the DPO7. The landscape buffer will be negotiated with each landowner and run the entire length of the subject site’s boundary, where it abuts existing residential land.  More information regarding the landscape buffer is included in attachment Thirteen.

·    Adjoining land owners made submissions to the Panel, and there was no clear consensus as to how to deal with interface issues, with some wanting screen planting and others wanting better subdivision design outcomes that would minimise the number of new lots abutting existing lots.

·    An expert witness for the proponent also appeared at the Panel hearing and suggested design guidelines to address the interface issues. However, this was not supported by the Panel and the Panel decided that the DPO7 requirements were a better outcome for dealing with subdivision layout.  

·    It is the view of officers that more could and should be done to further minimise the number of new lots abutting existing residential properties. At this stage, the proponent has advised that they believe the proposed Development Plan adequately deals with this issue.

·    The requirement for Open Space as set out in DPO7 has not been adequately addressed, and could serve to address both issues, at least in part:

o DPO7 clearly requires other open space to be provided within the development plan area and none has been proposed and the proponent has indicated they do not wish to provide any.

o The only public open space proposed is encumbered open space, adjacent to the waterway that traverses the site. The proposed Development Plan does not provide any public open space for future residents, except along the waterway.

o The Drouin PSP sets out an open space catchment of 400 metre radius. Although the Drouin PSP does not strictly apply to this site, this was due to the detailed issues at hand rather than the land not being suitable for inclusion for broader planning reasons. On this basis, it is considered that the Drouin PSP should be used as a strong guide for provision of such infrastructure.

·    If public open space was provided, it could be provided abutting existing residential lots, addressing some interface concerns as well as providing the requirement (or at least part) for public open space.

·    Officers are recommending that the proposed Development Plan does not meet the requirements of the DPO7 but it be placed on exhibition, in order to better understand community views about the proposal.

·    Exhibition of the proposed Development Plan will provide a better understanding of any issues and provide a potential way forward to find solutions to any such concerns. Recommending that the proposal be put to public exhibition is not an indication that the Responsible Authority is satisfied with the Development Plan.

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

·    The development of the subject land has been a contentious proposal for many years.  It is important to give opportunity for community feedback.

·    The Drouin Golf Club development plan is the opportunity resolve ongoing interface and amenity issues.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

·    There will be some impact upon the existing waterway on the land. However, as the proposal is still in its early stages, referral comments from relevant departments/agencies have not yet been received.

·    There are no identified threatened species or possible habitat for threatened species on the site, as identified by the proponent. 

FINANCIAL IMPACT

·    At this stage, there are no financial impacts apart from officer time and associated costs.

·    The land associated with this proposal is not covered by the Development Contribution Plan Schedule 2 incurring costs for infrastructure provision by the developer.

Consultation

·    It is proposed to undertake or require the proponent to undertake public consultation/exhibition of the proposed development plan. This is an important step given any subsequent subdivision application is specifically exempt from public notice. This means the only opportunity for the public to make submissions, is at the development plan stage.

·    It is recommended that the exhibition period is a minimum of 28 days.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This activity assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Strategic Objective 1: Vibrant Communities

1.2 Managing Baw Baw’s growth and development.

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This Development Plan will be considered under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities. Amendments will be recommended to ensure compatibility if required.

LEGAL

The proposal is governed by the requirements of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 and the Baw Baw Planning Scheme.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator
PDF Creator
PDF Creator
PDF Creator
PDF Creator
PDF Creator
PDF Creator
PDF Creator
PDF Creator
PDF Creator

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

 

10.5    Community Development Grants 2017/18

Community Development Officer

Directorate:  Planning and Economic Development

 

Ward:          All

 

Appendix:     2 attachments

       

 

purpose

For Council to determine the allocation of the 2017 Community Development Grants.

REcommendation

1.         That Council:

a.   Endorses the recommended 2017/8 Community Development Grants to a value of $247,865;

b.   Announces successful applicants at the presentation function on 30 October 2017;

c.   Notifies unsuccessful applicants, providing advice that Council Officers are available to discuss their relevant applications and available to work with groups to improve their application for future years; and

d.   Acknowledges and thanks independent and internal assessors for their valuable expertise and assistance in the process.  

2.         That Council undertakes a review of the Community Assistance

      Funding Program including Community Development Grants and   

           Sponsorship; and

 

3.         That Council launches the 2018/19 Community Development Grant

           Program on 3 April 2018.

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·    The Community Funding Assistance Program was endorsed by Council at the Ordinary Council Meeting of 11 May 2016, and Community Development Grants form part of this program.

·    The Community Development Grants Review 2016/17 was endorsed at the Ordinary Council Meeting on 24 May 2017.  Twenty-three recommendations were identified and enacted for this year’s Community Development Grants program. 

·    The purpose of the Community Development Grants (CDG) program is to support community, volunteer groups and organisations.

·    Grants are made to ‘Not-for-Profit’ organisations, groups and associations that can demonstrate the intended projects, programs, events and equipment, and restoration or renovations contribute to and provide benefits for the community.

·    Community Development Grants have four categories:

o Minor Capital Works

A maximum grant of $10,000 will be will be available to support minor repairs and renovations, including disabled access to buildings, sporting and other community facilities and playgrounds. This funding requires a community contribution to match Council’s grant.

o Minor Equipment Purchase

A new category with a maximum grant of up to $5,000 will be available for community groups to purchase key equipment to help facilitate community projects.

o Environment

A maximum grant of $2,000 will be available for activities that directly benefit the environment.

o Youth, Community Events and Programs

A maximum grant of up to $3,000 will be available to support events such as festivals and youth, community, sporting and cultural programs. Events and programs that cater for youth aged 12-25 are highly encouraged.

·    The program opened for applications on 26 June 2017 and closed on 18 August 2017.  A total of 90 applications were submitted, 19 were deemed ineligible through the initial eligibility check.

·    A total of 71 applications progressed to full assessment, completed by eight independent community members from Council’s Advisory Committees and six Council Officers.

·    The overall amount requested by the 71 eligible applications is $320,397 for a total project cost of $691,487.

Per category breakdown:

Category

Requested Grant Amount ($)

Total Project Cost ($)

Environment

3,960

4,555

Youth, Community Events and Programs

30,805

63,770

Minor Equipment Purchase

97,679

120,663

Minor Capital Works

187,953

502,499

TOTAL

320,397

691,487

Per ward breakdown:

Category

Requested Grant Amount ($)

Total Project Cost ($)

Central

76,325

124,919

East

187,566

424,862

West 

56,506

141,706

TOTAL

320,397

691,487

 

·    Applications were scored out of a possible 80.  Assessment consisted of pre-eligibility scoring (completed by Community Development Officer), an assessment completed by a Council Officer and a community volunteer. 

·    Officers have recommended that all projects with an equal or greater score of 56 should be considered for funding. 

·    Fifty-three applications have been recommended for funding.  These have been provided as Attachment One. 

Per category breakdown:

Category

Successful Grant Amount ($)

Total Project Cost ($)

Environment

960

960

Youth, Community Events and Programs

27,805

60,770

Minor Equipment Purchase

60,896

82,887

Minor Capital Works

158,204

411,561

TOTAL

247,865

556,178

Per ward breakdown:

Category

Successful Grant Amount ($)

Total Project Cost ($)

Central

57,169

105,648

East

145,189

325,803

West 

45,507

123,727

TOTAL

247,865

556,178

 

·    The recommendation will result in 18 applications being unsuccessful in the 2017/18 Community Development Grant round (Attachment Two). 

·    The presentation night for the Community Development Grants program has been confirmed for 30 October 2017. 

·    It is proposed to launch the 2018/19 Community Development Grant Program on 3 April 2018 to align with the financial year. 

TRIPLE BOTTOM LINE IMPLICATIONS

COMMUNITY IMPACT

·    The community receives benefit from Council’s ongoing support through the CDG grant program.

·    Feedback will be provided to unsuccessful applicants to enable a better understanding of how they can improve their chances of support by adhering to guidelines and deadlines.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

Those applications seeking funding for Environment all provide a beneficial and tangible environmental outcome which will also benefit to the wider community.

FINANCIAL IMPACT

The remaining budget for Community Development Grants and Sponsorship is approximately $268,525.

Consultation

·    Promotion of the 2017 Community Development Grant Program was undertaken via available media, networks, social media, websites and community meetings.

·    Two Community Information sessions were held.  Each session stressed requirements of the Community Development Grants Guidelines (quotations, budget, etc.) and that officers were available to provide assistance.

·    Council officers provided assistance to over 44 applicants on their applications, providing advice on what was required to demonstrate compliance with the Guidelines, budgets, quotations and other requirements.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

Community Development Grants assist with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Strategic Objective 1: Vibrant communities

 

Strategy 1.3 A vibrant, healthy and inclusive community.

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The Community Development Grants Program has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

·    A funding agreement was added to the process in 2015/16 year to formalise the responsibilities and accountability of grant holders.

·    The Annual Report details successful Community Development Grants each year.

POLICY IMPACTS

Nil

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

Community Members and Officers involved in the assessment of applications and preparation of this report have declared disclosable interests.

 


 

10.6    Fire Hazard Risk Reduction Strategy - Fire Hazard Inspection Program 2017/18

Acting Manager Building & Regulatory Services

Directorate:  Planning and Economic Development

 

Ward:          All

 

Appendix:     1 attachment

       

 

purpose

To provide Councillors with an overview of the Fire Hazard Risk Reduction Strategy as part of the Fire Hazard Inspection Program for 2017/18.

REcommendation

That Council endorses the Fire Hazard Risk Reduction Strategy as part of the Fire Hazard Inspection Program for 2017/18.

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·        In accordance with Section 41 of the Country Fire Authority Act 1958, Council has a duty to take all practicable steps (including planned burning) to prevent the occurrence of fires and minimise the danger of the spread of fires on any land vested in it or under its control or management.

·        The 2016/17 program was reviewed and several opportunities for improvement were identified.  These opportunities have been incorporated into the 2017/18 program, these include:

Ø  Developing and promoting the programs priority fuel treatment areas across the municipality;

Ø  Being consistent in the delivery of fire risk reduction objectives of the program;

Ø  Addressing concerns and issues expressed by farmers/primary producers and landowners relating to the implementation of the program.

·        To address the opportunities for improvement from last year’s program, a Fire Hazard Risk Reduction Strategy and a Fire Hazard Inspection Program Implementation Plan have been developed.  Both documents provide a consistent, strategic and governed approach in delivering the annual Fire Hazard Inspection Program.

·        The Fire Hazard Risk Reduction Strategy brings together legislation, organisational policies, planning overlays, fire management plans and risk management tools to formalise the approach in reducing fire risk in residential areas across the municipality.

·        As outlined in the strategy the purpose of the Fire Hazard Inspection Program is to reduce bushfire risk to the community (this includes residential, commercial and industrial).  The program also has several objectives, these are listed below:

Ø  Reduce fire spread and intensity across the landscape;

Ø  Improve community awareness of bushfire risk;

Ø  Fulfil obligations under the Municipal Fire Management Plan (MFMP) and Victorian Fire Risk Register (VFRR); and

Ø  Fulfil statutory obligations under the CFA act.

·        The Fire Hazard Inspection Implementation Plan outlines how the program will be implemented in the field.  The program will be implemented by inspecting high risk areas, identifying property and/or life that might be at risk from fire and issuing of Fire Prevention Notices (FPN) to landowners/occupiers.

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

·        This new approach to reducing fire risk through the fire hazard inspection program will ensure that the impact of the program will be targeted on specific areas where maximum risk reduction can occur with the least amount of Fire Prevention Notices issued to landowners/occupiers.

·        With any regulatory enforcement action, there is some level of dissatisfaction experienced by the community.  The new approach using a well-developed methodology allows Council to realign the programs priorities to focus on improving awareness of bushfire risk and suggesting to landowners/occupiers that fire prevention notices are issued to protect the community and their neighbours from fire risk.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

·    Vast areas of the municipality (including public land) have high environmental importance. The area features scenic values and natural habitat supporting flora and fauna of regional, state and national significance. The Fire Hazard Inspection Program recognises the need to protect these values and considers environmental impact in the development of fire prevention and preparation activities.

·    All Fire Prevention Notices specify the absolute minimum of vegetation that needs to be modified or removed to protect life and or property.  Fire Prevention Notices also don’t request landowners/occupiers to remove trees as part of fire risk reduction.

FINANCIAL IMPACT

·        No capital short term financial impact is expected.

·        Operationally there is a financial impact to the changes to this year’s program.  Historically, forced clearance works have been carried out by contractors on the request of the MFPO.  These contractors have tendered services to Council under a panel contract.  This season, these works will be carried out in a prescribed manner by the Parks, Gardens & Sport Fields Unit as requested by the MFPO.  The works are required to be done within a predetermined hourly cost and timeframe agreed upon by both parties in a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to provide transparency.

Consultation

·        Officers have consulted with the Victorian Farmers’ Federation on the implementation of this program.  This was in response to some of the feedback from last year’s program that farmers were asked to reduce fuels on their properties which impacted their farming practices.  The Victorian Farmers’ Federation representative, Ron Paynter has been involved with the development of the programs implementation plan and has approved the process that Council has developed.  The program will target specific areas of farm land (rural/urban interface areas) and will only ask farmers to carry out works to protect homes and community rather than request entire paddocks to be slashed without a robust risk management methodology.

·        The Municipal Fire Management Planning Committee (MFMPC) has been briefed on the programs strategies and objectives and have approved the program for implementation.  This includes a presentation given to the CFA Baw Baw Group of brigades in the municipality.

·        The Country Fire Authority, Manager Community Safety, South East Region has also approved the programs approach in reducing fire risk to the community.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

The Fire Hazard Risk Reduction Strategy assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Strategic Objective 3: Safe and Sustainable Environments

3.3 Community safety and protection.

3.4 Preparing for the impacts and consequences of climate change.

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This Fire Hazard Risk Reduction Strategy has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

Council is obligated legally to issue Fire Prevention Notices under Section 41 of the Country Fire Authority Act 1958.

POLICY IMPACTS

Fire Hazard Risk Reduction Strategy and implementation plan support and are in accordance with the fuel treatment strategies in the Baw Baw Municipal Fire Management Plan 2016.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

11.    Thriving Economy

Nil Reports

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

12.    Safe and Sustainable Environments

12.1    Domestic Animal Management Plan

Acting Manager Building & Regulatory Services

Directorate:  Planning and Economic Development

 

Ward:         

 

Appendix:     1 attachment

       

 

purpose

To provide a report to Council on the DRAFT Domestic Animal Management Plan 2017 – 2021.

REcommendation

That Council:

1.   Note the report; and

2.   Adopt the Domestic Animal Management Plan 2017 – 2021.

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·        Pursuant to Section 68A of the Domestic Animals Act 1994, every council must prepare a Domestic Animal Management Plan (DAM Plan) at 4 yearly intervals, and undertake annual reviews. Baw Baw Shire Council’s DAM Plan will set the strategic direction for the Council’s animal management activities until 2021.

·        Agriculture Victoria requires that all councils provide their Domestic Animal Management Plans in a format specifically outlined in their guidelines.

Program services and initiatives in the Plan include:

Ø  Conduct training of authorised officers;

Ø  Promote and encourage responsible pet ownership;

Ø  Ensure compliance with Act and Regulations;

Ø  Minimise the potential for dogs and cats to create a nuisance;

Ø  Minimise the risk of dog attacks;

Ø  Encourage the registration and identification of dogs and cats;

Ø  Dangerous Dogs, Menacing Dogs and Restricted Breed Dogs;

Ø  Address over population and high euthanasia of dogs and cats;

Ø  Review existing orders made under the Act and Local Law;

Ø  Registration and audits of all Domestic Animal Businesses; and

Ø  Other matters - Planning for the future of the pound facility.

Ø  Responsible Pet Ownership: Supporting people who are experiencing homelessness

·        Focus areas for the 2017 – 2021 DAM Plan include:

Ø  Delivery of Council’s new animal pound;

Ø  Investigating opportunities to reduce animal management costs to ratepayers;

Ø  Delivery of a Pet Expo and Adoption Day, to encourage responsible pet ownership and promote local rescue / foster care groups and animal related businesses / stakeholders.

·        The DAM Plan is required to be finalised and submitted to the Secretary by 3rd November 2017

·        Community consultation via Have Your Say commenced on 25th August until the 22nd September 2017, and a targeted consultation with key stakeholders was undertaken, which included:

Ø  Local Veterinary Clinics;

Ø  Domestic Animal Business Owners;

Ø  84Y Agreement holders (rescue groups, foster care groups, etc.);

Ø  Dogs Victoria;

Ø  Australian National Cats Inc;

Ø  Cats Victoria Inc.;

Ø  Feline Control Council;

Ø  The Governing Council of the Cat Fancy Australia and Victoria Inc.;

Ø  Warragul Dog Club;

Ø  Mt Baw Baw Dog Sled Club.

·        Only one amendment was made to the DAM Plan as a result of the submissions, with the introduction of a new paragraph at page 26, in response to the following feedback:

Re: Dogs On Leash/Off Leash (pages 25-26 of Draft) A timeline needs to be included for the “further investigations” mentioned and a timeline needs to be included for actually providing considerable “additional” and “appropriate” areas for off-leash walking.”

·        New paragraph inserted at page 26: The off-leash dog parks review and final report will be submitted to Council for a final decision 31 December 2017, along with a proposed schedule for the delivery of associated infrastructure.

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

The development of a new DAM Plan will serve to:

Ø  Protect the community and the environment from feral and nuisance dogs and cats; and

Ø  Encourage responsible pet ownership; and

Ø  Reunite owners with their pets as quickly as possible; and

Ø  Deliver animal welfare services in accordance with community expectations.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

The purpose of the DAM Plan is to promote animal welfare, the responsible ownership of dogs and cats and the protection of the environment within Baw Baw Shire. 

FINANCIAL IMPACT

·     There are several financial impacts as a result of the implementation of the DAM Plan. Many of the costs have already been factored in to Council’s annual budget, for example, staff training and development. It is expected that there will be costs associated with the following items:

Ø  New pound facility;

Ø  Officer training and development;

Ø  Pet expo and Adoption Day;

Ø  Finalisation of off leash parks and relevant infrastructure. The introduction of any infrastructure would require budget consideration from Council. Expected costs are outlined below. These costs include installation, GST and are based on per unit price:

Þ      Bins - $561

Þ      Signage - $143

Þ      Fencing (black 1.2m high chain mesh fence with top rail) - $60 per metre

Þ      Bag dispenser - $143 and associated bag rolls - $31.90 per roll.

Ø  If fencing was installed, it is expected it would have a lifespan of 20 to 30 years and signage would have a lifespan of five to 10 years; Graffiti and/or other vandalism would reduce the lifespan of these assets;

Ø  Signage at some parks will need to be updated upon confirmation of permanent specific dogs off leash areas.

Consultation

·     A Best Practice Review of the Compliance Unit was undertaken in 2012, and while some of these review items are no longer required, some of the findings in relation to the delivery of animal management services are still valid and have been considered in the development of the DAM Plan.

·     Internal consultation has been undertaken with the Community Compliance team.

·     Consultation with stakeholders, including veterinary clinics and local animal rescue groups, has commenced and further consultation will occur through a Have Your Say campaign, and direct contact will be made with key stakeholders.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

The DAM Plan assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Strategic Objective 3. Safe and sustainable environments

 

3.1       Protecting and sustainably managing Baw Baw’s environment.

3.3       Community Safety and Protection.

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

The DAM Plan has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

·        Under Section 68A of the Domestic Animals Act 1994, every Council must prepare a Domestic Animal Management Plan at 4 yearly intervals, and review these plans annually.

·        Council’s Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures have been consulted and referenced in the development of the DAM Plan.

POLICY IMPACTS

·     The DAM Plan will incorporate the review of relevant Orders that have been introduced pursuant to Section 26 of the Domestic Animals Act 1994.

·     The implementation of the DAM Plan enables Council to monitor the progress of actions, the effectiveness of current policies and Orders, and to investigate and implement further improvements to promote and facilitate responsible animal management programs on a regular basis.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

 

 

 

 

Baw Baw Shire Council

 

Draft Domestic Animal Management Plan 2017–21


 

Table of Contents

 

Introduction. 5

Legal Framework. 9

68A      Councils to prepare domestic animal management plans. 9

Training of Authorised Officers. 10

Registration and Identification. 17

Nuisance. 23

Dog Attacks. 28

Dangerous, Menacing and Restricted Breeds. 31

Over Population and High Euthanasia. 33

Domestic Animal Businesses. 37

Other Matters – Responsible Pet Ownership. 39

Other Matters – Planning for the Future of the Pound Facility. 41

Annual Review of Plan and Annual Reporting. 42

Appendix A.. 43

Our Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures. 43

Appendix B.. 47

Our Current Education/Promotion Activities. 47

Appendix C.. 48

Our Current Compliance Activities. 48

 


Executive Summary

Baw Baw Shire Council’s Domestic Animal Management Plan sets the strategic direction for the Council’s animal management activities until 2021. The Plan will be reviewed annually and has been developed in line with Section 68A of the Domestic Animals Act 1994.

 

Agriculture Victoria requires all councils to provide their Domestic Animal Management Plans in a format specifically outlined in their guidelines.

 

Under this format, items covered in this Plan include:

·    Training of authorised officers;

·    Registration and identification;

·    Nuisance animals;

·    Dog attacks;

·    Dangerous, menacing and restricted breed dogs;

·    Overpopulation and high euthanasia;

·    Domestic animal businesses; and

·    Other matters, of which Baw Baw has included responsible pet ownership and planning for the future of the pound facility.

 

Each section provides an outline of the current situation in Baw Baw, as well as future plans, actions and timelines to improve the level of service provided in these areas.

 

Some of the key activities planned to be undertaken as part of this Plan include:

·    Further officer training.

·    Targeted door knocking throughout the municipality to check for unregistered dogs and cats.

·    Communication and education campaigns to promote responsible pet ownership.

·    Introduce additional methods of payment (including online and phone payments) for new animal registrations.

·    Finalising the designated off leash areas.

·    Review and update procedures for recording barking dog investigations.

·    Assist residents with dealing with cat trespass / nuisance problems by improving the accessibility of cat cage hire.

·    Review the expansion of Council’s after hours’ service in relation to wandering animals.

·    Develop a formalised dog attack enforcement and investigation policy in line with the requirements of the Domestic Animals Act.

·    Finalise Council’s Dog Control Decision policy in relation to dog declarations and controls following a reported dog rush, chase or attack.

·    Investigate partnership with vets to run a discount desexing day or ongoing subsidised desexing program for pets of low income earners.

·    Identify all businesses that should be registered domestic animal businesses in the municipality.

·    In conjunction with local vets, businesses, and rescue groups, run a bi-annual Pet Expo and Adoption Day.

During the Plan’s development, consultation was undertaken with key stakeholders including local veterinary clinics, Council-contracted animal agencies, Council’s Community Compliance Team, and the broader community. Feedback and suggestions confirmed that the key deliverables within the DAM Plan are in line with community expectations, and provided further depth to inform the actions of Officers as they address each of the key deliverables.

 

The Community Compliance team undertook a Best Value Review in 2013. The review included community consultation, involving 500 surveys being sent to identified service users. Of the 500 surveys sent 103 were returned. Benchmarking was also undertaken with nine other councils to gauge our service delivery in a number of fields, including animal management.

 

The findings from the review have been taken into consideration in this Plan.

 

Our progress in the implementation of this Plan will be reported annually via the Council’s annual report.

 

Through the Plan, the Council has sought to balance the competing needs of pet owners, the broader community and the animals that share people’s lives. Council recognises the benefits of pet ownership, and acknowledges the role we play in promoting responsible pet ownership and animal-related enforcement. 
Introduction

Baw Baw Shire Council’s Domestic Animal Management Plan sets the strategic direction for the Council’s animal management activities until 2021. The Plan will be reviewed annually.

 

The Plan has been developed in line with Section 68A of the Domestic Animals Act 1994.

 

What are domestic animals and what are the benefits of being a pet owner?

Domestic animals are animals that live with Baw Baw residents, most commonly dogs and cats.

 

A wealth of research exists which highlights the benefits of pet ownership, including research undertaken for ‘Australians and Their Pets: The Facts’. These include:

·    People who own pets typically visit the doctor less often and use less medication;

·    On average, pet owners have lower cholesterol and blood pressure levels and are less likely to report feeling lonely;

·    Pet owners recover more quickly from illness and surgery and deal better with stressful situations;

·    Pet owners show lower levels of risk factors associated with heart disease;

·    Pets have been shown to greatly increase quality of life for the elderly; and

·    Self-esteem has shown to be higher in young people who have a pet.

 

Principles in Developing the Plan

The following provides an outline of the principles used when developing the Plan:

·    Pets are an important part of the community and bring health, wellbeing and social benefits to pet owners;

·    All animals will be treated humanely;

·    Pet owners must take responsibility for their pets, including their health and safety;

·    The needs of pet owners are to be balanced with the needs of other community members and the environment;

·    We respect that not all community members want to have contact with pets or animals; and

·    We will work to educate pet owners to be responsible, however we accept that enforcement action may be necessary on some occasions.

 

Baw Baw Population

Baw Baw Shire is made up of over 100 localities spread over 4,028 square kilometres, featuring both larger towns and rural areas.

 

The townships along the Princes Highway are experiencing rapid population growth with a number of new residential and industrial subdivisions being approved. As of 2016, Baw Baw Shire’s estimated population was 48,479 (up 13.1 per cent from 2011) across 18,698 households (ABS, 2016). The population is made up of a number of demographics, including balancing an ageing population with young families moving into the area.

With Baw Baw’s growing population, we would expect to see a growth in Baw Baw’s pet population. However, as of August 2017, there were 2,149 cats and 7,777 dogs registered in Baw Baw Shire, which is a reduction in registrations from October 2014 at which time 2,452 cats and 8,938 dogs were registered in Baw Baw Shire. This may be because of a Council wide restructure in 2016, which resulted in a reduction in resources for the Community Compliance team, and an increase in responsibilities including Planning Enforcement and Asset Protection. These factors in turn impacted on the ability of the team to undertake proactive doorknocks to identify unregistered animals, and to follow up on animal registrations that were not renewed. 

 

Baw Baw Shire is also home to twelve registered domestic animal businesses which includes pet shops, boarding kennels, training establishments, and breeding and rearing establishments, as well as Council’s Municipal Pound.

 

Some of the existing animal management issues within the shire include:

·    Failure to register and re-register pets by existing and new residents;

·    Dogs at large or not under effective control;

·    Barking dogs;

·    Dog attacks on people and other animals;

·    Dog excrement in public places;

·    Overpopulation of cats, including feral cats;

·    High cat euthanasia rates; and

·    Excessive animal numbers without applicable permits.

 

Animal Management Services 

The animal management services provided by the Community Compliance team are:

·    Impounding of animals;

·    Facilitating adoptions and the rehoming of animals, and forming partnerships with external agencies to increase rehoming and reduce euthanasia rates;

·    Managing complaints relating to domestic animals and livestock;

·    Promoting responsible pet ownership;

·    Investigating reports of dog attacks, rushes and chase, and undertaking prosecutions and enforcement action where applicable;

·    Ensuring compliance with legislation and codes of practice relevant to domestic animals and livestock;

·    Animal registration process;

·    Referring detected animal welfare issues to the relevant authorities;

·    Management of domestic animal businesses;

·    Providing advice to pet owners and the community; and

·    After hours animal emergencies.

 

Resourcing

Baw Baw Shire Council’s Community Compliance team undertakes animal management activities on behalf of the Council.

 

The Community Compliance Team sits within the Building and Regulatory Services department, under the Growth and Economic Development directorate.

 

There are five full time Community Compliance Officers and one Senior Compliance Officer that report directly to the Compliance Coordinator, who in turn reports to the Manager Building and Regulatory Services. All of the Community Compliance Officers are multi-skilled, and responsible for animal management as part of their role. Currently, a casual animal attendant is engaged to perform basic pound responsibilities including cleaning, feeding and caring for the animals. A full-time pound attendant will be employed to undertake pound operations following the opening of the new pound facility.

 

Consultation

Through the Plan, the Council has sought to balance the competing needs of pet owners, the broader community and the animals that share people’s lives. Council recognises the benefits of pet ownership, and acknowledges the role we play in promoting responsible pet ownership and animal-related enforcement. 

 

During the Plan’s development, consultation was undertaken with key stakeholders including local veterinary clinics, Council-contracted animal agencies, Council’s Community Compliance Team, and the broader community. Feedback and suggestions confirmed that the key deliverables within the DAM Plan are in line with community expectations, and provided further depth to inform the actions of Officers as they address each of the key deliverables.

 

The Community Compliance Team also undertook a Best Value Review in 2013. The review included community consultation, involving 500 surveys being sent to identified service users. Of the 500 surveys sent 103 were returned, representing a 20 per cent response rate.

 

The findings from the review have been taken into consideration in this plan.

 

Format of this Plan

The Bureau of Animal Welfare requires all councils to provide their Domestic Animal Management Plans in a format specifically outlined in their guidelines.

 

Items covered in this Plan include:

·    Training of authorised officers;

·    Registration and identification;

·    Nuisance animals;

·    Dog attacks;

·    Dangerous, menacing and restricted breed dogs;

·    Overpopulation and high euthanasia;

·    Domestic animal businesses; and

·    Other matters, of which Baw Baw has included responsible pet ownership and planning for the future of the pound facility.

 

Council Framework

Council Plan

The Council Plan represents a four year road map for the Council, and describes the key services and priorities that Council will focus on between 2017 and 2021.

 

The Community Compliance Team is responsible for a number of areas within the Council Plan which have been taken into consideration during the development of the Domestic Animal Management Plan.

 

 

Council Orders, Local Laws, Policies and Procedures

Baw Baw Shire Council has in place policies, procedures and local laws that are designed to encourage responsible pet ownership and respond to animal management issues experienced in Baw Baw Shire.

 

Some of these address more than one section of this Plan. To avoid repetition, details of Council’s orders, local laws, policies and procedures can be found in Appendix A.
Legal Framework

Under Section 68A of the Domestic Animals Act, every council must prepare a Domestic Animal Management Plan, as follows:

          

68A     Councils to prepare domestic animal management plans

                (1)  Every Council must, in consultation with the Secretary (of the Department of Primary Industries), prepare at 4 year intervals a domestic animal management plan.

                    

                (2)  A domestic animal management plan prepared by a Council must—

                         (a)  set out a method for evaluating whether the animal control services provided by the Council in its municipal district are adequate to give effect to the requirements of this Act and the regulations; and

                         (b)  outline programs for the training of authorised officers to ensure that they can properly administer and enforce the requirements of this Act in the Council's municipal district; and

                         (c)  outline programs, services and strategies which the Council intends to pursue in its municipal district—

                                   (i)  to promote and encourage the responsible ownership of dogs and cats; and

                                  (ii)  to ensure that people comply with this Act, the regulations and any related legislation; and

                                 (iii)  to minimise the risk of attacks by dogs on people and animals; and

                                 (iv)  to address any over-population and high euthanasia rates for dogs and cats; and

                                 (v)  to encourage the registration and identification of dogs and cats; and

                                 (vi)  to minimise the potential for dogs and cats to create a nuisance; and

                                (vii)  to effectively identify all dangerous dogs, menacing dogs and restricted breed dogs in that district and to ensure that those dogs are kept in compliance with this Act and the regulations; and

                         (d)  provide for the review of existing orders made under this Act and local laws that relate to the Council's municipal district with a view to determining whether further orders or local laws dealing with the management of dogs and cats in the municipal district are desirable; and

                         (e)  provide for the review of any other matters related to the management of dogs and cats in the Council's municipal district that it thinks necessary; and

                          (f)  provide for the periodic evaluation of any program, service, strategy or review outlined under the plan.

                    

                (3)  Every Council must—

                         (a)  review its domestic animal management plan annually and, if appropriate, amend the plan; and

                         (b)  provide the Secretary with a copy of the plan and any amendments to the plan; and

                         (c)  publish an evaluation of its implementation of the plan in its annual report.

Training of Authorised Officers

Section 68(A)(2)(b) of the Domestic Animals Act states that councils must outline programs for the training of authorised officers to ensure that they can properly administer and enforce the requirements of this Act in Baw Baw.

 

Objective

To ensure that all staff involved in animal management have the knowledge and skills necessary to carry out their work.

 

Context

Baw Baw Shire is made up of over 100 localities spread over 4,028 square kilometres, featuring both larger towns and rural areas.

 

As of 2016, Baw Baw Shire’s estimated population was 48,479 (up 13.1 per cent from 2011) across 18,698 households (ABS, 2016). The population is made up of a number of demographics, including balancing an ageing population with young families moving into the area.

 

With Baw Baw’s growing population, we would expect to see a growth in Baw Baw’s pet population. However, as of August 2017, there were 2,149 cats and 7,777 dogs registered in Baw Baw Shire, which is a reduction in registrations from October 2014 at which time 2,452 cats and 8,938 dogs were registered in Baw Baw Shire.

 

Baw Baw Shire is also home to twelve registered domestic animal businesses which includes pet shops, boarding kennels, training establishments, and breeding and rearing establishments. Two of these establishments are Council owned, including Council’s Municipal Pound, and Utopia Pet Lodge. Utopia Pet Lodge was purchased by Council in September 2016 as an existing boarding kennel and cattery, and, following registration being granted by the Minister, has continued its operations with minimal changes.  It is set to close its boarding operations on 31st August 2017, with the existing building being repurposed as Council’s new Municipal Animal Pound.

 

Baw Baw Shire Council’s Community Compliance Team comprises five equivalent full time (EFT) Community Compliance Officers, a Senior Compliance Officer, and a Compliance Coordinator. All of the Community Compliance Officers are multi-skilled, and responsible for animal management as part of their role. Currently, a casual animal attendant is engaged to perform basic pound responsibilities including cleaning, feeding and caring for the animals. A full-time pound attendant will be employed to undertake pound operations following the opening of the new pound facility.

           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Baw Baw Key Statistics

2016

2014

2012

Population

48,479

45,205

42,861

Households

18,698

16,489

16,489

Area

4,028 square kilometres

4,028 square kilometres

4,028 square kilometres

Number of authorised animal management officers (EFT)

5 (estimated 3 EFT dedicated to animal management)

4

4

 

Current and Planned Training

 

The Community Compliance Best Value Review asked the wider community for feedback on training requirements for Community Compliance staff, based on their experience with our team, and their expectations as pet owners and members of our community.

 

Through the community consultation, the most highly mentioned aspect of the service delivery and its quality related to customer service provided by the team.

Recommendations for improvements were made with regards to:

·    Timeliness and responsiveness of the team in relation to messages and complaints; and

·    Communication and customer service skills of staff.

 

There is likely to be some overlap between respondents’ understanding of customer service from the Community Compliance Team and Council in general.

 

A staff workshop identified a number of issues with various aspects of the service affecting the level of customer service:

·    Managing conflict and aggressive customers;

·    The challenges brought about by multi-skilling Officers; and

·    Contingencies to cover staff absences, such as illness and leave.

 

The above findings highlight the need for further training to support staff in dealing with difficult customers and setting the community’s expectations around providing timely customer service.

 

These responses have been taken into account for our planned activities over the next four years.

 

Authorised Officer Training

 

Current

2017

Planned

 

Industry training – animal handling, animal assessment, statement taking, prosecution

 

Officers are required to attend ongoing industry training

Annually

OH&S training - conflict resolution, dealing with difficult or aggressive customers

 

Mandatory training is conducted internally with all Council staff

 

Annually

 

Bureau of Animal Welfare – training and information days

 

All Officers attend these sessions on a rotational basis as they become available

 

Intermittently as available. Target - minimum of 2 Officers to attend each session

Training in Animal Control, Animal Welfare and Regulation

 

Hands on training is provided at the commencement of employment, and Officers are required to undertake external training with an accredited provider within their first 12 months if no previous qualification is held

 

Within 12 months of commencement, and ongoing skills update depending on availability

Restricted Breed Dog Identification

Four Officers have undertaken training offered by the Bureau of Animal Welfare, although this was several years ago

Further training opportunities are being investigated and will be undertaken by all Officers, particularly with the changes to legislation allowing for the registration of Restricted Breed dogs

 

Auditing of Domestic Animal Businesses

Two Officers have had formal training in undertaking audits

Further training opportunities are being investigated and will be delivered to all Officers

 

Diploma of Government

Two Officers have undertaken a Diploma of Government

Training and development goals will be identified through Individual Performance Development Plans and undertaken as required

 

Diploma in Policing

Two Officers have undertaken a Diploma in Policing

Training and development goals will be identified through Individual Performance Development Plans and undertaken as required

 

Internal Organisational Training –

 

An Organisational Training Package is currently being developed focussing on investigation and case management, brief preparation and prosecution

 

To be delivered to existing Authorised Officers, and upon appointment of new Officers

Microchip implantation training

Currently one Officer is accredited to implant microchips

 

Further training opportunities are being investigated and will be made available to Officers at their discretion

 

DNA sample taking

Currently two Officers have undertaken this training and further training opportunities are being investigated for additional Officers to be trained and authorised

 

Further training opportunities are being investigated and training will be rolled out across 2018/19

Municipal Fire Prevention Officer Training and Safety Course

 

Four Officers have completed this training to date

Training needs will be identified through Individual Performance Development Plans and undertaken as required

 

Detecting Family Violence (specifically related to animal management)

 

Three Officers have been involved in training and information sessions regarding Family Violence to date

 

Further training opportunities are being investigated and training will be rolled out across 2018/19

Induction program for new staff

 

All staff across Council complete a standard induction program including online e-learning; corporate induction; business unit induction and induction review workshops. 

 

Within 3 months of commencement with Council

Diploma of Management

 

Two Officers hold their Diploma of Management

Training and development goals will be identified through Individual Performance Development Plans and undertaken as required

 

Certificate IV in Justice

 

Two Officers hold their Certificate IV in Justice

 

Training and development goals will be identified through Individual Performance Development Plans and undertaken as required

 

Diploma of Justice

 

One Officer holds their Diploma of Justice

Training and development goals will be identified through Individual Performance Development Plans and undertaken as required

 

Prosecutors Training Course

 

Two Officers have undertaken the Prosecutors Training Course

 

Training and development goals will be identified through Individual Performance Development Plans and undertaken as required

 

Cultural Awareness / Indigenous Relations Training

Baw Baw Shire has a large Indigenous population. No training has been undertaken in relation to cultural awareness, and would prove beneficial to Officers interacting with this area of the community

 

Training opportunities are being investigated and will be delivered to all Officers

 

 

Our Plans

 

Objective 1: Develop and implement a training policy that clearly identifies minimum training requirements and any additional training needs that should be undertaken by Authorised Officers by June 2018.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Identify minimum training requirements by consultation with management and staff.

 

By June 2018

Documentation to be finalised and incorporated into an internal training policy by June 2018.

Identify additional training opportunities by consultation with management and staff.

 

Ongoing

Ongoing - additional training opportunities identified and attended by Officers, recorded on the skills matrix.

 

Objective 2: Develop training plans for each officer to be incorporated in to their annual Individual Performance Development Plan.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Identify additional training opportunities, and develop training plans for each officer to be incorporated in to their annual Individual Performance Development Plan, and entered in to the Skills / Training Matrix.

By December 2017

Annual review of register to ensure its accuracy and to ensure proposed training goals have been incorporated into Individual Performance Development Plan.

 

 

 

Objective 3: Ensure all Authorised Officers have completed their minimum training requirements within 12 months of appointment.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Identify minimum training requirements for officers and record when officers have completed each course and the timelines for completing each course.

 

By June 2018

Monthly review of Skills / Training Matrix to ensure each officer has completed their minimum training requirements within 12 months of appointment.

 

Objective 4: Formalise a specific Animal Management Officer induction program.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Document a formalised induction program for new Community Compliance Officers which includes relevant training, in accordance with the training policy.

 

By June 2018

Reviewed following the induction of any new Community Compliance Officers.

Ensure that any agency / contract staff are qualified to undertake animal management in accordance with Section 72A of the Act.

 

Ongoing - Prior to appointment of a person

who is not an employee of the Council as an

authorised officer

Prior to appointment of a person

who is not an employee of the Council as an

authorised officer, documentation must be provided to confirm that the person has the qualifications or experience prescribed by the

Secretary, which will be stored on Council’s database.

 

Objective 5: Provide each Authorised Officer with further investigation, statement taking and prosecution training to ensure continuous improvement of Officer skills.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Develop internal training package focussing on investigation and case management, brief preparation and prosecution, to be delivered to existing Authorised Officers, and upon appointment of new Officers.

 

By June 2018

Training package to be finalised and delivered to existing Authorised Officers by June 2018.

 

Monthly review of Skills / Training Matrix to ensure each officer has completed their minimum training requirements within 12 months of appointment.


Registration and Identification

 

 

Objective

To increase and maintain high levels of pet registration and microchipping within Baw Baw Shire.

 

Current Situation

Registration and microchipping of dogs and cats is a priority in the success of Baw Baw Shire’s animal management, and is key to responsible pet ownership.

 

When pet owners register and microchip their dogs and cats, it enables Council to reunite lost pets with their owners efficiently. Registration also assists Council to plan its animal management activities, services and infrastructure.

 

The Council provides detailed information to residents about registration and microchipping requirements. This is conveyed through media releases, advertising, Council’s website, social media and brochures available at Council’s service centres.

 

Pet Registration Data

As of August 2017, there were 2,149 cats and 7,777 dogs registered in Baw Baw Shire. This is a decrease of 303 cats and 1,161 dogs since 2014.

           

Based on BIS Shrapnel’s formula for estimating the number of dogs and cats per municipality (based on the number of households) it is estimated that 72 per cent of dogs and 30 per cent of cats are registered within Baw Baw Shire. This has decreased from 94 per cent and 39 per cent respectively since 2014, and can be attributed to a significant reduction of resources within the Compliance team between 2015 – 2017, resulting in an inability to undertake Council’s doorknocking program (see ‘Pet Registration Activities’ below for more details), as well as data cleansing occurring in 2016 and 2017, resulting in more accurate records.

 

Pet Registration At A Glance

Key Statistics

2017

2014

2012

Number of registered dogs

7,777

 

8,938

8,543

Estimated dog population*

10,770

9,497

9,497

Estimated dog registration rate

72%

94%

90%

Number of registered cats

2,149

2,452

2,253

Estimated cat population*

7,146

6,302

6,302

Estimated cat registration rate

30%

39%

36%

* Based on BIS Shrapnel formula.

 

It is no surprise that Baw Baw’s two most heavily populated towns, Warragul and Drouin, led the way with cat and dog registrations. As of August 2017, Warragul was home to 2,238 registered dogs and 739 registered cats, followed by Drouin with 2,079 registered dogs and 656 registered cats.

 

To assist in keeping Council registration data up-to-date, the RSPCA send a monthly report to Council regarding pets adopted from them into Baw Baw. This enables Council to capture new registrations.

 

Pet Registrations by Town (October 2014)

 

 

Pet Registration Activities

Baw Baw Shire Council continues to undertake similar activities to those listed in the previous Domestic Animal Management Plan, however, escalated efforts will be made to achieve a higher rate of pet registrations in the 2017 – 21 period.

 

Baw Baw Shire Council sends pet registration renewal notices to pet owners each year, which is supported by a communications campaign to encourage pet owners to pay their registrations on time, and includes using the media, advertising, social media, Council’s website and electronic signage.

 

The Community Compliance team will also reinvigorate its doorknocking program to detect unregistered pets. Historically, this targeted approach has resulted in a significant number of pets being registered or re-registered with Council. The doorknocking program will continue over the life of this plan.

 

Baw Baw Shire Council offers financial incentives to encourage pet owners to microchip and desex their pets. Pets that are desexed or obedience trained can be registered at 1/3 of the cost of a non-desexed animal. No discounts exist if a cat or dog is only microchipped, in line with legislative changes introduced in 2013.

 

Of the 7,777 dogs currently registered, 5,307 or 68% are desexed, and of the 2,149 cats registered 1,809 or 84% are desexed. It is pleasing to see that a large number of pet owners display responsible pet ownership through desexing their pets. We expect to see an increase in the number of desexed registered cats, following the introduction of mandatory desexing in 2016, and the ongoing promotion of desexing pets.

 

Eligible pensioners receive a 50 per cent discount on their pet registration fees. Of the 7,777 dogs registered in Baw Baw, 27 per cent belong to a pensioner. Similarly, of the 2,149 cats registered, 35 per cent belong to a pensioner.

 

The community identified a service delivery gap through the Best Value review consultation, which was lack of online payments and applications for animal registrations. Currently, only animal registration renewals are able to be paid online. New applications are only payable in person or via mail.

 

Microchipping Activities

Baw Baw Shire Council runs limited activities in relation to microchipping, however the introduction of legislation requiring animals to be microchipped prior to being registered has assisted to keep microchipping numbers elevated.

 

Council’s Customer Service Team does not transact new animal registrations unless proof of microchipping has been sighted. It is also mandatory to microchip and register any animals from the Baw Baw Shire pound before release or adoption.

 

Council currently has one officer trained in microchip implantation, and is investigating further opportunities to train additional officers. In house microchipping will reduce costs associated with returning animals to their owners, and would expedite the return of animals as it would no longer be necessary to make an appointment and transport animals to a veterinary clinic for implantation. Benefits would also be realised in relation to adopted animals and those rehomed through our partners.

 

Discounted microchipping will also be offered at future Pet Expos.

 

Our Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures

See Appendix A.

 

Our Current Education/Promotion Activities

See Appendix B.

 

Our Current Compliance Activities

See Appendix C.

 

Summary

It is disappointing to note that registration figures have decreased since 2014, which is likely attributable to the reduced capacity of the Community Compliance Team to promote and pursue compliance. The lack of Doorknocking has proven to be detrimental to our pursuit for increased compliance, and as such, will be undertaken with vigour throughout the life of this plan.

 

Additionally, both estimated population figures and on-the-ground experience suggests that there is an increasing issue regarding cat registrations. It is expected that there are many more cats living within Baw Baw Shire that are not registered. Although exact figures are not available, there is a high proportion of seized cats that are not microchipped or registered, resulting in difficulty in reuniting owners with their pets.

 

There is an opportunity for the Council to partner more closely with local veterinary clinics to encourage responsible pet ownership. Council has an existing rapport with local veterinary clinics, and agreements in place relating to animal management. Ongoing consultation to determine how we can strengthen the partnership, particularly in relation to registration and microchipping, would be beneficial.

 

An issue was identified by Community Compliance staff in relation to the accuracy of the Council’s data regarding pet owners. This could be rectified by cross-checking the Council’s data with microchipping databases.

 

Our Plans

 

Objective 1: Increase the registration rates of dogs and cats which are over the age of three months and reside within the municipality, and ensure that they are implanted with a microchip and/or displaying identification.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Ensure all seized and impounded animals are registered prior to release.

Prior to every release.

Review annual increase in registration numbers.

 

Review number of dogs and cats being seized and impounded who are not registered to their owner.

Conduct an annual door knock to identify unregistered dogs and follow up outstanding registrations to gain compliance.

Rolling program of doorknocks throughout the year to pick up missed registrations.

Assists the public and provides them every opportunity to comply.

 

Increases number of animal registrations and ability to reunite missing animals.

 

Review annual increase in registration numbers.

 

Review number of dogs and cats being seized and impounded who are not registered to their owner.

 

Records of number of unregistered and un-microchipped animals identified during door knocks.

 

Increase section 84Y agreements and agents for registration, enabling the immediate registration and return of pets to their owners

 

Prior to Agreement renewals in April 2018

Increased number of section 84Y agreements implemented and agents for registration operational, resulting in a greater number of pets returned directly to their owner without Council intervention.

 

Mail out of registration renewal forms.

Annually in March

Provides residents every opportunity to register their pets prior to 10 April. 

 

Compulsory micro-chipping of dogs and cats for first registration and transfer from another Council.

Ongoing

Promotes recovery rate. 

Assists Officers with identification. 

Promote “April Amnesty” for pet registration, where owners can register pets over the age of 3 months for the first time, that should have been registered previously, without fear of infringement or enforcement action resulting.

 

Annually in April

Promotion at Pet Expo and via media releases from late March and throughout April.

 

 

Objective 2: Continue to educate the community about the importance of pet registration and microchipping.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Conduct an annual communications campaign in the lead up to pet registration fees being due.

 

Media releases through Council’s Communications Department, providing information to residents on when registration is due, how and where to register, fee structure, registration form, what information they need to provide (e.g. microchipping, desexing certificates), letting Council know they are no longer the owner, have changed address or the pet is deceased. Highlight renewal period on website in March and April

 

Annually in Feb - March

Annually review the number of animal registrations paid (generally and on time).

 

Annually monitor the number of animals registered with Baw Baw Shire.

 

Raises awareness relating to responsible ownership.

Assists Officers to ensure strays can be returned as soon as collected. 

Promotes compliance.

Pet Expo

Bi-annually in March / April

Provide discounted micro chipping, and promote responsible animal ownership through information and advice available on the day including local services such dog training, nutrition, pet grooming, veterinary attention.

 

Objective 4: Improve the accuracy of Council’s registration database by cross-referencing with microchip registry data by June 2019.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Improve accuracy of Council’s pet registration database by contacting microchip registries to obtain details of dogs and cats in the municipality that are microchipped. Check all animals are also listed on the Council’s pet registration database and follow up those that are not registered.

 

June 2019

Demonstrate an increase in numbers of pets registered with Council following the microchip registry cross referencing exercise.

 

Objective 5: Improve customer service and ease with which to pay animal registration fees.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Introduce additional methods of payment (including online payments) for new animal registrations and renewals.

 

June 2018

Alternative payment methods to be introduced by June 2018.

 

 

 

 

 


Nuisance

 

Objective

To reduce the number of animal-related complaints.

 

Current Situation

Baw Baw Shire Council regularly handles nuisance animal complaints, ranging from wandering cats and dogs to barking complaints.

 

Baw Baw Shire’s activities in relation to these areas include hiring cat cages, collecting and impounding wandering animals and associated enforcement, and investigating barking dog complaints.

 

Cat Cages

The Council has noticed a decrease in the number of cat cages being hired by community members in the 2015/16 period, which is attributed to the reduced number of cages available due to damage or non-return. 10 new cat cages were purchased in early 2017, which has led to an increase in cat cages due to their availability. In 2014/15, cat cages were hired 120 times. 2015/16 saw a decrease with only 74 hires, and the frequency of hires increased again in 2016/17 to 89.

 

The cat cage system in delivered in partnership with the Customer Service Team. Cat cages are hired out with a bond from the hirer, and returned to Council when the nuisance cat has been captured, or within seven days.


When cats are able to be identified, they are returned to their owners with either a warning (first offence) or infringement (subsequent offences) and owners are provided with information about responsible pet ownership, including containing cats to their property.

 

Barking Dogs

In an opposite trend to cat cage hire, barking dogs continue to be an issue for numerous residents. There were 34 barking dog complaints investigated in 2014/15, 33 in 2015/16, and the 2016/17 saw a significant increase in barking dog complaints with 58 reports being investigated.

 

Although Council currently has a barking dog complaint process in place, a review of the process is being undertaken in order to ensure a more positive outcome for all impacted parties, through education and voluntary compliance. Council’s Local Law 2016 has provided Officers with additional tools to assist them in managing barking dog complaints, through the introduction of animal noise provisions, which require that an owner or occupier of any land must take reasonable steps to: prevent any animal making unreasonable noise on the land; or prevent any noise caused by an animal being emitted from the land which in the opinion an Authorised Officer is: (i) unreasonable or objectionable to a person on other land or premises; or (ii) adversely affects the amenity of any person on other land or premises.

 

In addition, the Local Law sets out the factors that will be taken in to consideration throughout an investigation, including steps that may be taken by the owner of an alleged barking dog/s to remedy the nuisance.

 

Baw Baw Shire does not offer barking dog collars for hire, but information is provided to dog owners and they are encouraged to investigate options to control nuisance barking. Owners are also made aware that the use of e-collars or shock collars is controlled by the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act (POCTA), and that they must obtain written veterinary approval prior to the use of these collars.

 

 

Wandering Animals

Despite a slight drop in wandering animals from 2012/13 where 327 reports being received, to 2014/15 where 294 reports were received, the following 2 years saw a substantial increase in wandering animal complaints. In 2015/16, 560 reports were received, and in 2016/17 the number of complaints were more than double that of 2014/15, with a staggering 747 wandering animals being responded to.

 

Wandering animals are detected both proactively through routine patrols, and reactively when the Council receives complaints.

 

When animals are found, they are scanned for a microchip and checked for a Council registration tag. If animals are able to be identified, contact is made with the owner to reunite them with their pet. Similarly to wandering cats that have been trapped, where the cat is microchipped, currently registered, and the owner can be contacted, a warning is issued for a first offence, followed by infringements for subsequent offences.

 

If wandering animals are unidentifiable, they are taken to Council’s pound, where they are held for the statutory period of eight days before being available for adoption.

 

The Council also has agreements with numerous animal rescues and veterinary clinics, who often take animals to re-house them after the statutory period if they have not been immediately adopted, or where they have special care requirements, for example, pregnant bitches, puppies, kittens, elderly or infirm animals.

 

Feedback from the Community Compliance Best Value review suggested that wandering animals are an issue after Council’s normal business hours, as well as during business hours. While the Community Compliance Team does offer an after-hours service, it is limited to emergencies such as dog attacks and livestock on roads. Any animals found wandering are not handled until the next working day. The overwhelming feedback from community consultation was to review the after hours service provided and expand it to collect wandering animals after hours.

 

Dogs On Leash/Off Leash

Prior to July 2016, Baw Baw Shire Council did not have any on leash orders in place which would require that dogs be on a leash at all times except for in designated areas. This caused concern for our community, with dogs being able to be exercised and walked off leash anywhere, putting the safety of our community at risk of unwanted interactions with dogs. Following extensive consultation, Council introduced an Order pursuant to Section 26 of the Domestic Animals Act 1994, requiring that “the owner of any dog must keep the dog in effective control by means of a chain, cord or leash held by the owner and attached to the dog while the dog is in any public place, other than designated off-leash areas”.

 

A list of Baw Baw Shire’s parks was collated and an audit undertaken of which parks may be appropriate for off leash areas. A trial of these identified parks as off leash areas was undertaken, however, following feedback received by Council through the trial process, and follow up audits of these areas, further investigations are now being undertaken to: ensure that the areas are appropriate for use; establish what infrastructure will be required; and identify additional potential areas.

 

The off-leash parks review and final report will be completed by 31 December 2017.  The report will then be considered by Council.  Once a decision is made as to the parks to be designated a proposed schedule for the delivery of infrastructure will be developed.

 

Our Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures

See Appendix A.

 

Our Current Education/Promotion Activities

See Appendix B.

 

Our Current Compliance Activities

See Appendix C.

 

Summary

Since 2014/15, reports of wandering animals have increased significantly. Our information does not explain why the substantive increase has occurred. Council’s objective is to decrease the number of wandering animals through education campaigns and Pet Expos, as well as educating owners of wandering animals directly.

 

Both veterinary clinics and the general community have requested a review of the Council’s after hours services to include the collection of wandering animals. This item was also flagged as a priority in the best value review.

 

Barking dog complaints are increasing, which is not surprising as our population grows, particularly the development of residential areas where property sizes are smaller and dogs are more likely to bark at other animals that reside nearby, with neighbouring residents more likely to be affected by the barking due to close proximity to the property on which the dog lives.

 

The community is also calling for a Council decision regarding permanent dogs off leash areas and relevant infrastructure. The finalisation of these areas is being treated as a priority


Our Plans

Objective 1: Educate the community and provide readily available information relating to animal nuisance.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Pet Expo – ‘Compliance’ stall providing information to residents regarding animal nuisance.

Bi-annually in March / April

Promote responsible pet ownership through information and advice available on the day including a Compliance stall, and local services such as dog training, nutrition, pet grooming, and veterinary attention.

Finalise the locations of designated off-leash areas, and undertake educational campaign regarding their location and responsible use.

June 2018

Permanent off leash dog parks identified and appropriate signage and infrastructure installed.

Promotion through Council’s website and media releases.

Ongoing education of the community regarding recently introduced cat curfew through Council’s website, media releases, and with registration renewals.

Ongoing

Reduction in the number of cats impounded.

Reduction in the number of nuisance cat complaints.

 

Objective 2: Reduce nuisance animal complaints by 2% per year.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Educate the community regarding responsibility to pick up and dispose of dog faeces through Council’s website, media releases, signage in off leash parks, provision of poo bags in Council parks and reserves.

 

Ongoing

Increased use of the dog poo bags provided.

Reduction in the number of

complaints regarding dog faeces.

Assist residents dealing with cat trespass / nuisance problems by investigating additional locations for cat cage hire / return for rural based residents.

 

By June 2018

Additional locations confirmed and infrastructure / processes implemented as required.

 

Number of cats impounded via additional locations.

 

Objective 3: Meet the community’s expectations in relation to service regarding wandering animals.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Review the expansion of Council’s after hours service in relation to wandering animals.

By December 2017

Number of animals collected after hours.

 

Community satisfaction survey results.

 

Review procedures related to nuisance animals to ensure that community needs are being met.

By June 2018

Community satisfaction survey results.

 

Customer satisfaction / dissatisfaction indicated to Officer on completion of request, and recorded in request notes.

 

Complaints/compliments received.

 

Objective 4: Improve response and provide greater consistency in responding to barking dog complaints.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Develop a barking dog kit which includes relevant information to be provided to dog owner and impacted customer, to educate both parties and encourage resolution.

 

By June 2018

Number of barking dog complaints received.

 

Number of kits issued.

 

Outcome of complaints – number of complaints resolved through voluntary compliance vs number of infringements / further enforcement.

 

 

Dog Attacks

 

Objective

To reduce the number of reported dog attacks across the municipality.

 

Current Situation

Baw Baw Shire has experienced an increase in the number of reported dog attacks and rushes since 2014/15.

 

A spike in the number of dog attacks was noticed in 2016/17, which correlates with the significant increase in the number of wandering animals in the same year.

 

 

Dog attacks are given priority by Community Compliance Officers and are responded to within 15 minutes. It is preferable to be on site within 15 minutes of the report being received, however on occasions when substantial travel is required, phone contact is made on route to the scene.

 

Dog rushes increased substantially in 2015/16, followed by a decrease in the 2016/17 year. Dog rushes are treated similarly to a dog attack. A full investigation is undertaken and enforcement action, including infringements, are issued as necessary. When a dog rush occurs, dog owners are educated about confining their dog to their property.

 

Dog attacks are attended by Community Compliance Officers after hours and are treated as an emergency regardless of whether the attack occurs during business hours or after hours.

 

Dog attacks mostly occurred in and around the home, including the pavement in front of the home and on neighbouring properties. Public areas where people and dogs congregate, such as parks, also create risk.

 

Council continues to increase awareness of the impacts of dog attacks, and the benefits of confining a dog to their property as the key to preventing dog attacks. Increased education and raised awareness is an objective over the life of this plan, including raising awareness about the need to check fencing and gates for potential escape routes for dogs.

 

Our Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures

See Appendix A.

 

Our Current Education/Promotion Activities

See Appendix B.

 

Our Current Compliance Activities

See Appendix C.

 

Summary

Both dog rushes and dog attacks have increased in Baw Baw Shire since 2014. This is concerning and points to an opportunity for further educate the community about keeping their animals confined to their property.

 

Our Plans

 

Objective 1: Reduce the number of dog attacks and dog rushes and ensure that they are handled consistently.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Develop a formalised dog attack enforcement and investigation policy in accordance with the requirements of the Domestic Animals Act.

 

By June 2018

Policy finalised and implemented.

 

Review each dog attack investigation to ensure each Community Compliance Officer is managing investigations consistently.

 

Finalise a Dog Control Decision Policy to be utilised in relation to reports of dog rushes, chases and attacks.

 

By June 2018

Policy finalised and implemented.

 

Review all reports of dog rushes, chases and attacks, and ensure that relevant paperwork is completed and submitted in each case.

 

 

 

Objective 2: Educate the community about the difference between a dog attack, dog rush, the importance of keeping animals confined to their property and the importance of reporting dog attacks.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Improve public awareness of what a dog attack is and how to report it using media articles, advertising, Council’s website, social media and brochures available at customer service centres. 

 

By June 2018

Compare the number of dog attacks reported to Council pre and post campaign.

 

Measure the number of dog rushes reported accurately (as opposed to being reported as a dog attack).

 

Measure the number of overall dog attacks and dog rushes.

Dangerous, Menacing and Restricted Breeds

 

Objective

To effectively manage dogs that are classified as dangerous, menacing or of a restricted breed.

 

Current Situation

If a dog exhibits certain behaviours and/or there is an incident then Council has the power to declare that dog either a menacing dog or a dangerous dog, depending on the offence/s detected. Dogs must be declared by Council and are not declared menacing or dangerous as a preventative measure because they “may become aggressive”.

 

A dog can be declared as menacing if it has rushed at or chased a person or it bites any person or animal causing injury that is not in the nature of a serious injury.

 

A dog can be declared as dangerous if it has caused the death of or serious injury to a person or animal by biting or attacking that person or animal; or if the dog is a menacing dog and its owner has received at least two infringement notices in respect of the offence in Section 41E (restraint of menacing dog).

 

The number of registered declared dangerous dogs and registered menacing dogs living in Baw Baw Shire has increased since 2014. There are six declared dangerous dogs and eighteen menacing dogs.

 

Key Statistics

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

2017

Number of registered declared dangerous dogs

 

 

6

Number of registered menacing dogs

 

 

18

Number of registered restricted breed dogs

 

 

1

 

Community Compliance Officers maintain a register of dangerous, menacing and restricted breed dogs living in Baw Baw Shire on behalf of the state government.

 

Officers also inspect premises where dangerous, menacing or restricted breed dogs are housed a minimum of once per annum, and conduct inspections when a dog has been newly declared as dangerous to ensure housing requirements are being met.

 

Restricted breed dogs are different to dangerous or menacing dogs.

 

A restricted breed dog is any one of the following:

·    American Pit Bull Terrier (or Pit Bull Terrier);

·    Perro de Presa Canario ( or Presa Canario);

·    Dogo Argentino;

·    Japanese Tosa; or

·    Fila Brasilierio.

 

Restricted breed dogs have controls placed on them due to the increased potential of an aggressive nature of the breed in general, and not necessarily as a result of an incident. There is one restricted breed dog living in Baw Baw Shire, being a Dogo Argentino. An American Pit Bull Terrier was residing in the municipality from 2016 – 2017, but passed away recently.

 

Our Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures

See Appendix A.

 

Our Current Education/Promotion Activities

See Appendix B.

 

Our Current Compliance Activities

See Appendix C.

 

Summary

The number of dangerous and menacing dogs in the shire has risen since 2014, as a result of increased dog attack and dog rush incidents being reported and investigated. The number of restricted breed dogs increased for approximately 12 months, but has reduced to the previous status of one. This figure may change with the newly introduced changes to the legislation regarding the ability to register restricted breed dogs. Annual inspections are conducted on premises where dangerous dogs are housed to ensure compliance with regulations.

 

Our Plans

 

Objective 1: Identify and register all declared dogs in the municipality by June 2018.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Finalise a Dog Control Decision Policy to be utilised in relation to reports of dog rushes, chases and attacks.

 

By June 2018

Policy finalised and implemented.

 

Review all reports of dog rushes, chases and attacks, and ensure that relevant paperwork is completed and submitted in each case.

Cross-reference microchip database information with current Council registration database for potential restricted breed dogs by June 2017.

June 2018

Annual review of the number of restricted breed dogs in Baw Baw.

Undertake annual spot checks

Annual and ongoing

Confirmed compliance with all legislative requirements for the keeping of declared dangerous, menacing and restricted breed dogs.

Over Population and High Euthanasia

 

Objective

To minimise the number of animals surrendered, pets without homes and animals euthanised.

 

Current Situation

Over Population

Community Compliance Officers have noted a significant increase in the number of cats being surrendered or seized, mostly from a large population of feral cats.

 

There remains a continuous problem with residents harbouring stray and feral cats by providing feed for them, yet not accepting the responsibility of ownership by way of registration and desexing. This subsequently leads to further breeding and a larger feral cat population.

 

Feral cats that are seized or surrendered often present with cat flu, other health issues or a temperament that is unsuitable for rehousing, which leads to higher euthanasia rates.

 

However, Council’s statistics show that 84 per cent of registered cats are desexed, indicating a level of responsible pet ownership within the community, and confirming that there are still a number of cats in our community who are unregistered and/or feral.

 

 

Desexed

Non-desexed

Total registrations

% of animal population desexed

Dogs

5,307

2,470

7,777

68%

Cats

1,809

340

2,149

84%

 

As mentioned under ‘Nuisance Animals’ the Council has noticed a decrease in the number of cat cages being hired by community members in the 2015/16 period, which is attributed to the reduced number of cages available due to damage or non-return. 10 new cat cages were purchased in early 2017, which has led to an increase in cat cages due to their availability. In 2014/15, cat cages were hired 120 times. 2015/16 saw a decrease with only 74 hires, and the frequency of hires increased again in 2016/17 to 89.

 

A large proportion of cats seized through the cat cage program are feral, unregistered or not microchipped.

 

When adopting animals, it is mandatory for adopters to have the animals desexed and registered before leaving the pound to help address overpopulation.

 

In conjunction with the implementation of Council’s Community Local Law 2016, Orders were introduced regarding mandatory desexing of cats and a cat curfew.

 

Euthanasia

Since 2014/15, Baw Baw has experienced a steady increase in the number of impounded animals, from 361 in 2014/15 to 451 for 2016/17.

 

Of the 451 animals impounded in 2016/17, 94 of these animals were euthanised, including 15 dogs – 2 having been seized as a result of dog attacks, and 3 having been surrendered by their owners, and 79 cats.

 

 

 

The Council also has six Section 84Y agreements in place under the Domestic Animals Act with local veterinary clinics to perform medical duties or assist with
re-housing if necessary. This also contributes to managing high euthanasia rates.

 

Our Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures

See Appendix A.

 

Our Current Education/Promotion Activities

See Appendix B.

 

Our Current Compliance Activities

See Appendix C.

 

Summary

Baw Baw’s figures suggest that the dog population is not causing an issue with over population or excessively high euthanasia rates. Of the estimated dog population of 10,770, 7,777 are registered, equating to 72 per cent. Of those registered 5,307 or 68% are desexed, which helps to control an overpopulation of dogs.

 

There are also low euthanasia rates for dogs being experienced in Baw Baw. Reasons for dogs being euthanised vary from dogs being declared dangerous, owners being unable to provide for declared dog requirements or illness. Compared to other councils, Baw Baw’s dog euthanasia rate is low.

 

Council’s statistics also reflect the feral cat problem being experienced in Baw Baw. Of the estimated 7,146 cats that live in the shire, only 2,149 are registered. However of those registered, 1,809 or 84% are desexed, which confirms that the overpopulation issue is being caused by feral cats.

 

Cat cage hire figures as well as figures for the number of cats impounded increasing also supports this.

 

Key Statistics

2017

2014

2012

Number of registered dogs

7,777

 

8,938

8,543

Estimated dog population*

10,770

9,497

9,497

Estimated dog registration rate

72%

94%

90%

Number of registered cats

2,149

2,452

2,253

Estimated cat population*

7,146

6,302

6,302

Estimated cat registration rate

30%

39%

36%

 

 

Our Plans

Objective 1: Increase the number of desexed registered cats by 2 per cent each year.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Continue to promote the mandatory desexing of cats in accordance with the Order introduced in 2016.

Ongoing

Increase in the number of desexed cats residing in the municipality.

Investigate partnership with vets to run a discount desexing day or ongoing subsidised desexing program for pets of low income earners.

 

By June 2018

Number of vets participating in the program

 

 

Objective 2: Raise awareness about semi-owned cat population .

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Implement “Who’s for cats?” education campaign in local area. Utilise the following resources:

·    "Are you feeding a bigger problem?" (Who's for Cats? campaign fact sheet) - distribution throughout the municipality, placement on website

·    Radio ad - can be used for council 'on hold' phone messages, and also airing on local community radio stations

·    Template media release - for publication in local newspapers

·    Print ads - for publication in local newspapers

·    TV commercial file - can be used on website

·    Promotions to encourage people to take full ownership of cats eg discount desex/microchip/vaccinate offers, free products

 

By June 2018

Measure number and type of education materials distributed.

 

Record number of campaign queries received by Council.

 

Record number of semi owned cats handed into local pound / shelter.

 

Measure number of cats registered after the campaign has run.

 

 

 

Objective 3: Institute a formal procedure for assessment for euthanasia or suitability for rehoming of dogs and cats by June 2015.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Document a formalised procedure for assessing animals in regards to suitability for rehoming.

By June 2018

Number of animals rehomed or released in comparison with euthanasia data.

Increase the number of 84Y partnerships and further develop relationships and consistent processes

By June 2018

Number of animals rehomed or released in comparison with euthanasia data.

 

Objective 4: Increase the number of cat adoptions

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Undertake further promotion of animals available for adoption through social media, rolling advertisements on televisions in Council foyer, other media mediums

By June 2018

Increase in number of animals adopted

Provide a cat adoption viewing area at Council’s new pound facility

By June 2018

Cat adoption area operational and an increase in cat adoptions


Domestic Animal Businesses

 

Objective

To provide education to domestic animal businesses to assist them to comply with legislative requirements.

 

Current Situation

Baw Baw Shire Council is currently home to eight domestic animal businesses comprising of:

 

·    Three boarding establishments;

·    Four pet shops;

·    Three breeding and rearing establishments;

·    One dog training establishment; and

·    One pound facility.

 

Overall, the Council has a low level of domestic animal businesses and few compliance issues.

 

All domestic animal businesses are audited annually to ensure compliance with relevant standards. Inspections are also undertaken prior to any new domestic animal businesses operating in the shire.

 

The Council also collects an annual levy on behalf of the state government for all domestic animal businesses.

 

Our Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures

See Appendix A.

 

Our Current Education/Promotion Activities

See Appendix B.

 

Our Current Compliance Activities

See Appendix C.

 

Summary

Overall, Baw Baw Shire does not have many domestic animal businesses and annual audits performed to date have not uncovered any significant issues.

 

The Council is considering increasing its presence in domestic animal businesses by conducting random inspections throughout the year to ensure compliance.

 


Our Plans

Objective 1: Identify and register all domestic animal businesses in the municipality by June 2018.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Identify all businesses that should be registered domestic animal businesses in the municipality. Identify businesses selling pets / pet products / services in the municipality and follow up to determine whether they should be registered with the Council.

June 2018

Compare number of registered domestic animal businesses before and after activity.

Respond to complaints regarding unregistered DAB’s as a priority

Ongoing

Record any unregistered businesses.

Ensure compliance.

 

Ensure that the Planning Department notify Compliance when enquiries or permit applications are received for Domestic Animals

Ongoing

To follow up and ensure compliance

 

Objective 2: Annually inspect and audit all registered domestic animal businesses.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Continue to annually audit all domestic animal businesses within Baw Baw Shire.

 

Conduct random inspections of registered domestic animal businesses.

 

Annually by 9 April.

 

 

Minimum once per annum.

Monitor compliance of domestic animal businesses annually.

 

 

Number of visits per domestic animal businesses annually.

 

Compliance with relevant codes and standards.

 

Objective 3: Ensure 100 per cent compliance with registration and mandatory codes of practice for all domestic animal businesses each year.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Formalise a policy to deal with audit outcomes within three months of inspection.

June 2018

Compliance rates of domestic animal businesses.

 

Time taken to rectify issues raised at domestic animal business audits.

 

 

Other Matters – Responsible Pet Ownership: Supporting people who are experiencing homelessness

 

Objective

To provide support to people who are experiencing homelessness, in relation to any animals they may own, to enable them to keep their pets with them and become compliant with the Domestic Animals Act and Council’s Community Local Law 2016.

 

Current Situation

In 2016/17, the Community Compliance Team responded to information in relation to homeless persons living within our municipality that had animals with them.

 

The bond between companion pets and their owners, is very important in the lives of many homeless. They find solace, protection and companionship through their pets. They care for their pets on limited resources so they themselves have less.

 

I response to our displaced community members, assistance was provided to ensure that the animals were microchipped and registered, and were securely confined or under effective control.

 

However, it has been identified that no formal process or policy is in place to ensure that support can be delivered quickly and consistently.

 

Informal discussions with Victoria Police members found that we often have contact with the same homeless people living in our community, and our local police are interested in forming a partnership and developing a policy to guide our response actions in our contact with the homeless.

 

Internal departments within Council have also expressed interest in being involved in this project, and further consultation will be undertaken in order to form a working committee to develop and implement an appropriate policy to ensure that homeless persons living within our municipality are supported.

 

Our Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures

See Appendix A.

 

Our Current Education/Promotion Activities

See Appendix B.

 

Our Current Compliance Activities

See Appendix C.

 

Summary

It has been identified that no formal policy or provisions are currently in place to support people who are experiencing homelessness, in relation to any animals they may own, to enable them to keep their pets with them whilst remaining compliant with relevant legislation.

 

Consultation will be undertaken with local police, other internal Council departments, and all relevant stakeholders to develop a policy to ensure immediate and consistent support is provided to any person in our community experiencing homelessness.

 

Our Plans

 

Objective 1: To provide support to people who are experiencing homelessness, in relation to any animals they may own, to enable them to keep their pets with them without being in breach of any relevant legislation.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

In conjunction with local police, other internal Council departments and all relevant stakeholders to develop a policy to ensure immediate and consistent support is provided to any person in our community experiencing homelessness.

By June 2018

Policy developed and implemented

 

 

 

 


Other Matters – Planning for the Future of the Pound Facility

 

Objective

To provide a pound facility that meets the needs of our growing community and is compliant with the Code of Practice.

 

Current Situation

The Baw Baw Shire Council pound currently has the capacity to hold up to eight dogs and nine cats.

 

With a growing human and animal population, the pound is often at full capacity and no longer meets the needs of the community.

 

The Community Compliance Team have in place a set of robust procedures for running the pound, however,  a new pound facility is required to cater to the growing community’s needs.

 

An established building has been purchased which has, until the 31st August 2017, been operating as a boarding facility for cats and dogs. Works will be undertaken to repurpose the building as Council’s new animal pound, in line with the Code of Practice for the Operation of Shelters and Pounds.

 

Our Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures

See Appendix A.

 

Our Current Education/Promotion Activities

See Appendix B.

 

Our Current Compliance Activities

See Appendix C.

 

Summary

The Council’s pound facility is often at capacity and does not cater for a growing community.

 

An established building has been purchased which has, until the 31st August 2017, been operating as a boarding facility for cats and dogs. Works will be undertaken to repurpose the building as Council’s new animal pound, in line with the Code of Practice for the Operation of Shelters and Pounds.

 

Our Plans

 

Objective 1: Provide a replacement pound facility that is run in accordance with relevant standards and meets the needs of our growing community.

 

Activity

When

Evaluation

Undertake works to repurpose the building located in Longwarry North as Council’s new animal pound.

By January 2018

Building works complete and new animal pound operational.

 

Review of all pound procedures and processes to ensure they are current and applicable to new animal pound.

By January 2018

Adopted procedures and processes that are undertaken consistently.

 

Annual Review of Plan and Annual Reporting

As per Section 68A(3) of the Domestic Animals Act 1994, the Council will review its Domestic Animal Management Plan annually to assess whether any amendments are necessary in order to ensure the plan is relevant and can be completed within the required timeframe.

 

The Council will expand its evaluation reporting to include more detailed statistics to ensure clarity and transparency relating to Council’s animal management services.

 

The Council will publish the evaluation of its Domestic Animal Management Plan as part of its Annual Report.

 

In the final year of the plan, Council will undertake a major review and prepare drafting the next Domestic Animal Management Plan.

 

 

 


Appendix A

Our Orders, Local Laws, Council Policies and Procedures

 

 

 Local Laws

Council Policies

·    Number of animals in a residential area.

 

Procedures

·    Impounding domestic animals

·    Handling ‘aggressive dogs’

·    Releasing impounded domestic animals

·    Assisting police

·    Domestic animal complaints

·    Declaration dangerous/menacing dog

·    Search warrants

·    Restricted dog breeds

·    After hours emergency service

·    Excess animal permits

·    Registration of a domestic animal business

·    Equipment

·    Vehicle use and maintenance

·    Manual handling

·    Community Local Law 2016

 

Appendix B

Our Current Education/Promotion Activities

Baw Baw Shire Council aims to promote responsible pet ownership through educational programs and promotion activities. These include:

 

·    Media releases

·    Paid print advertising

·    Radio advertising

·    Media interviews

·    Brochures available at Baw Baw Shire Customer Service Centres

·    Council website

·    Social media, including Facebook and Twitter.

·    Annual mail out of dog and cat registration renewal forms.

·    Compulsory microchipping of dogs and cats for all registrations.

·    Free dog and cat transfer of registration when relocating to Baw Baw Shire Council, if the animals are currently registered with another Council.

·    Follow up of non-renewal of registrations and conduct door-knocking program to capture unregistered animals and animals where registration has not been renewed.

 

Following the success of previous Pet Expos, Baw Baw Shire will conduct a Pet Expo and Adoption day bi-annually to provide education to our community.

 

The Council will aim to run a minimum of two community education campaigns per annum to educate pet owners about various responsibilities.

 

 

 

 

Appendix C

Our Current Compliance Activities

 

The Domestic Animals Act 1994 requires the Council to administer and enforce the provisions of the Act.

 

The approach used by the Council in the first, preferred instance is to educate the community and encourage pet owners to take responsibility for the pet voluntarily. The more successful this approach is, the less enforcement is required.

 

Emphasis is always placed on maintaining community safety.

 

The Council’s compliance activities include:

·    Regular street patrols to detect wandering animals.

·    For non-serious or non-safety related offences, taking an ‘ask, tell, enforce’ approach, including verbal and written warnings where appropriate, provision of information, notices to comply and enforcement as a last resort.

·    Prosecutions as required.

·    Annual inspections of dangerous dog enclosures and domestic animal businesses.

·    Respond to community complaints regarding non-compliance with provisions of the Act.

·    Provision of an after hours emergency service in the instance of dog attacks.

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

 

12.2    Tender - Contract No. 21772CT Panel of contractors provision of weed control and bushland services

Environment and Pest Plant Coordinator

Directorate:  Planning and Economic Development

 

Ward:          all

 

Appendix:     2 attachments

      

 

purpose

For Council to consider the awarding of Tender No 21772CT to a Panel of Contractors for provision of weed control and bushland services for the 2017-2019 financial year.

REcommendation

That Council:

1.   Accepts the submitted contract tenderers for Tender No. 21772CT and appoints to the Panel of Contractors for weed control and bushland services to the following -

Ecobalance Services

Envirogain Pty Ltd

Habitat Creations

Indigenous Design Environmental Services P/L

JGH Contracting Pty Ltd

Landlinks Environmental Services

G & A Spraying

Grand Ridge Propagation

Native Habitat

Hazelwood Operations

Platypus Environmental Services Pty Ltd

Bayles Spraying Pty Ltd

 

2.   Delegates the Chief Executive Officer to sign and authorise the contract agreements.

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·    The tender is to provide maintenance and management services for a Panel of Contractors to deliver weed control and/or bushland services within a range reserves in Baw Baw Shire.

·    Weed and bushland management in Baw Baw Shire covers a range of differing land types from roadsides to bushland reserves, constructed wetlands and gravel walking tracks. A range of contractors with different skill sets (see attachment) and capacity is needed to fulfil this requirement, including:

o Wetland establishment and management (identification, placement and maintenance of plants),

o Roadside weed control to treat infestations of blackberry (equipment, local knowledge and capacity),

o Bushland reserve maintenance (plant identification and knowledge of appropriate weed control measures),

o Management of gravel walking tracks in reserves (equipment).

·    Council will manage areas targeted for maintenance and management under this contract, including:

o ten constructed wetland reserves under annual maintenance contracts,

o three native vegetation offset sites,

o forty-nine bushland and tree reserves,

o sixty kilometres of gravel walking tracks, and

o over 1600 kilometres of rural roadsides targeted for noxious weed control.

·    As Council does not have an internal bushland crew with resources to undertake these maintenance activities, most of the work is undertaken by contractors.

·    A number of weed control contractors are required to successfully deliver Council’s weed control program, particularly during the peak growing season from October to April.

·    Supply of plants and planting services have been included in this tender to allow the tender to cover a broader range of services.

·    Council received 17 tenders to be considered on the Panel of Contractors.

·    Tender submissions were evaluated in accordance with nominated criteria including capability, price and local economic benefit. Twelve of the seventeen tenderers are recommended.

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

·    Control of noxious weeds on roadsides and in bushland reserves prevents weed spread onto private property and farmland.

·    Well maintained reserves provide attractive areas for our community and visitors to visit and enjoy.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

Establishment and maintenance of wetlands, bushland reserves and control of noxious weeds on roadsides are key activities in improving Council’s biodiversity assets and roadsides.

FINANCIAL IMPACT

·    Capital – contractors engaged through Contract 217721CT will be engaged to deliver planting and establishment works funded through the existing Capital Works Wetland Establishment budget.

·    Operating – contractors will also deliver Council’s Roadside Weed Control program which targets control of noxious weeds on rural roadsides funded by State Government funding and council.  Maintenance of Council’s bushland reserves and wetlands is also included, funded through existing weed control budgets.

Consultation

The community will be informed about locations of roadsides to be targeted for noxious weed control through articles in local media and information sent to Landcare group members.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

The establishment of a Panel of Contractors for weed control and bushland services assists with the achievement of the key strategic objectives as set out in the Council Plan 2017:2021

Strategic Objective 3. Safe and Sustainable Environments

3.1 Protecting and sustainably managing Baw Baw Shire’s Environment

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This project has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

Council has a legal responsibility under Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994 to control Declared Noxious Weeds on Council owned and managed land including roadsides.

POLICY IMPACTS

Baw Baw Shire has a Procurement Policy made in accordance with requirements of Section 186A of the Local Government Act 1989.  Tender evaluation was carried out in accordance with this policy.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

 

12.3    PLA0139/16 - 3 Warraview Close, Warragul for the use of part of the land and outbuildings for the keeping of poultry and birds (domestic Animal Husbandry)

Senior Statutory Planner , Statutory Planning Officer

Directorate:  Planning and Economic Development, Planning and Economic Development

 

Ward:          Central

 

Appendix:     11 attachments

       

 

purpose

That Council consider Planning Permit Application PLA0139/16 for the use of part of the land and outbuildings for the keeping of poultry and birds [domestic animal husbandry] at 3 Warraview Close, Warragul as requested by Councillors Kostos and O’Donnell.

REcommendation

That Council resolve to issue a Notice of Decision to approve Planning Permit Application PLA0139/16 to use part of the land and outbuildings for the keeping of poultry and birds [domestic animal husbandry], in general accordance with the endorsed plans at 3 Warraview Close, Warragul.

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·    The proposal is to allow for the use of the rear part of the land and existing outbuildings/penning for the keeping of poultry and birds [as domestic animal husbandry]. This will consist of up to 100 birds which are predominantly show and rare breeds.

·    The land is within the Low Density Residential Zone (LDRZ).

·    The land is subject to a covenant which restricts the Development of the land to a Single Dwelling and usual Outbuildings and that buildings must be constructed of new materials. 

·    Legal advice was sought which confirmed that the proposal does not breach the covenant pursuant to the buildings being constructed of new materials.

·    The surrounding land is also with in the LDRZ developed with single dwellings on lots over 4000m². 

·    The adjoining land contains a single dwelling (5 Warraview Close) for which the land is also used as a place of assembly, predominantly for wedding ceremonies, in accordance with a previous planning permit PLA0093/16 issued on 30/08/2016.  This permit has bounded the subject land at 3 Warraview Close in relation to the provision of car parking associated with the place of assembly at 5 Warraview Close.

·    A Planning Permit is required to:

o Use the land for animal husbandry within the Low Density Residential Zone pursuant to Clause 32.03-1 of the Baw Baw Planning Scheme (the Scheme); and

o Construct a building or carry out works in the Low Density Residential Zone in association with a use in Section 2 of Clause 32.03-1 pursuant to Clause 32.03-4 of the Scheme.

·    Seven (7) submissions were received during the notice period;

o Three (3) against (was originally four however one objection was withdrawn);

o Three (3) in support of the application; and

o A further referral response from a notification to the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) recommended to not support the proposal but did not formally objected to the proposal.

·    The concerns raised by the three (3) objections are summarised as follows:

o The use and scale of the development – intensive vs extensive;

o Precedent for other hobby farms;

o Perception of court changing from residential to commercial;

o Potential for increased scale in the future;

o Insufficient notification;

o Increase of vermin and other health risks;

o Increased traffic; and

o Impact on land values

 

·    The application is considered to be consistent with the State Planning Policy Framework and the Local Planning Policy Framework, including the Municipal Strategic Statement and local planning policies, the provisions of the Low Density Residential Zone and the decision guidelines at Clause 65.01 of the Scheme.

·    The application is also considered to be consistent with previous decisions made by the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal regarding the keeping of birds on residential properties.

o In the Tribunal’s decision of Blackney v Greater Geelong CC [2005], the Tribunal declared that the keeping of 60 pigeons is ancillary to a dwelling; and

o In Robinson v Bayside CC [2002], the Tribunal set aside Council’s decision to refuse a to issue a permit, identified that the keeping of 110 pigeons was ‘animal husbandry’ requiring a planning permit and determined to issue a permit subject to conditions.

·    A number of conditions can be imposed to ensure the proposal operates with adequate guidelines to ensure an adequate level of amenity is maintained and that any detrimental impact is appropriately regulated. Such conditions are also pertinent to address objectors’ concerns:

o It is determined that limiting the number of birds kept on the land to a maximum of 100 birds is adequate in light of the information provided by the applicant and the previous decisions made by the Tribunal.

o Adequate conditions related to waste, soil, and runoffs management and general amenity including specific vermin management can ensure that the landowner will operate its hobby in a responsible manner.

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

The proposal may result in land use conflicts if not managed appropriately through conditions.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

The proposal may have negative environmental impacts if not managed appropriately through conditions.

FINANCIAL IMPACT

·    An application fee of $553 was received.

·    During assessment, legal advice was obtained at a cost of $2,673.

·    Additional resources or financial cost will be incurred should the applicant or objectors seek a determination at the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT).

o It is considered that a refusal would be unlikely to be supported by the Tribunal.

Consultation

·    Notice of the application was given to adjoining and adjacent landowners and occupiers within 100 metres of the subject site via registered post under Section 52(1) (a) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 (the Act) and notice was given via the display of an A3 sign on site for a minimum of 14 days pursuant to Section 52(1) (d) of the Act. Seven (7) submissions regarding the proposal were received.

 

·    The application was referred internally to Council’s Public Health Department and Council’s Local Law department and the Building Department who have not objected to the proposal subject to permit conditions.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This decision assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Strategic Objective 1. Vibrant Communities

 

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This report has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

Legal advice was obtained regarding whether the proposal was contrary to a covenant applying to the land. The proposal is not contrary to the covenant and can therefore be determined.

It is possible that if the proposal is refused, the applicant may challenge Council’s decision at the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal and, based on previous decisions by the Tribunal a decision to refuse may be likely overturned.

POLICY IMPACTS

·    Community Local Law 2.1, whilst it is not applicable in this instance as a planning permit is required.  However, it provides relevant context and is discussed in the officer report.

·    Community Local Law 2.1 (quantity of animals) limits poultry to 6 birds in residential areas, on land up to 3,999m2, but no limit over 4,000m2.  The subject land is 6,131m2.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 

 

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

13.    Organisational Excellence

13.1    Tender (21771CT) Recommendation Report - Waste Disposal Contract for Baw Baw Shire Council Garbage

Coordinator Waste Management & Contracts

Directorate:  Community Assets

 

Ward:          Whole Shire

 

Appendix:    

      

 

purpose

To consider award of the contract for Tender (21771CT) – Waste Disposal contract for Baw Baw Shire Council Garbage.

REcommendation

That Council:

·    Accepts the offer submitted by SUEZ (ABN  70 02 902 650) for Tender No. 21771CT Waste Disposal contract for the Baw Baw Shire Council Garbage for an estimated sum of $2,215,709.46 (excluding GST) for disposal costs only for a contract period until 30 September 2019;

·    Notes the two extensions (2 years and 1 year) provided in the contract at Council’s discretion; and

·    Delegates the Chief Executive Officer to sign and authorise the contract agreements after they have been prepared.

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·    Latrobe City Council (Latrobe) and Baw Baw Shire Council (Baw Baw) entered into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in February 2013 to use Latrobe City’s, Hylands Highway Landfill for an agreed tonnes of 43,294 tonnes at a discounted gate fee.

·    Latrobe has advised in July 2017 that once those agreed tonnes were achieved the gate fee will be amended to reflect the market prices.

·    At the Council Briefing on 2 August 2017, Council officers were asked to tender these services as required by the Council procurement policy.

·    The agreed tonnages under the MOU have now been reached and an increased gate fee is now applicable for waste disposed at Hylands Highway Landfill.

·    Council staff have tendered and received prices from the following landfill disposal operators, as per the following:

o Solo Resource Recovery (SOLO) to use Cleanaway Pty Ltd (Cleanaway) Landfill/Transfer Station

o Hallam Road Landfill, Hallam managed by Suez Recycling & Recovery Pty Ltd (SUEZ)

o Drovers Place Transfer Station, Pakenham managed by Cleanaway

·    Tenders were evaluated in accordance with the tender conditions.

·    The total costs for Council in relation to the waste disposal are made up of two components:

Landfill gate fee costs (disposal costs)

Cartage costs

·    The costs were calculated for three scenarios considering the existing contract extensions for Kerbside Waste Collection for Solo. The original contract term with Solo ends on 30 September 2017.

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

There would be potential budget savings by changing current waste disposal arrangements which would result in positive community impact.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

The travel distance for waste disposal trucks will reduce if the landfill facility is located closer to the Shire boundaries such as Pakenham. This would result in reduction in carbon emission and thus would impact positively on the environment. The relevant submission on the evaluation criteria was awarded highest score to consider this impact.

FINANCIAL IMPACT

Based on the preferred tenderer prices, the award of contract to SUEZ will result in saving of approximately $300,000 over two years compared to Council’s existing arrangement with Latrobe Landfill.

Consultation

Council staff have consulted Solo Resource Recovery being the Kerbside waste collection contractor as required by the contract.

Council staff have also consulted Gippsland Waste and Resource Recovery Group (GWRRG) during the tender evaluation stage to seek their input.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This initiative assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Strategic Objective 4. Organisation excellence: Innovative, community focused and future ready

4.1.1 Continuously improve Council’s services, systems and business processes.

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This tender has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

The award of this tender does not have any legal issues as long as the prices are kept confidential.

POLICY IMPACTS

New service arrangements have been tendered in accordance with the procurement policy.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 

 

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

 

13.2    Annual Report 2016/17

Leader Strategy and Innovation  

Directorate:  Chief Executive Officer

 

Ward:         

 

Appendix:     2 attachments

       

 

purpose

To present Baw Baw Shire Council Annual Report 2016/17 for adoption.

REcommendation

 That Council adopt the Annual Report 2016/17. 

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·        The Annual Report 2016/17 provides a review of the Council’s operations, major activities, achievements and challenges for the financial year.

·        The Annual Report 2016/17 is prepared in two parts, the Report of Operations 2016/17 and the Annual Financial Report 2016/17. The report provides funding bodies with an audit certified copy of the Council’s financial accounts.

·        The Independent Auditors report by the Victorian Auditor-General’s Office for The Financial Report and The Performance Statement is included in the Annual Report. Audit Opinion was received by Council on Friday 22 September 2017 and this is included in the report.

·        Council made significant progress and achievements across each of the Council Plan Objectives including the below highlights:

Objective 1: Our Community

o Commencement of the $13.4m upgrade of the West Gippsland Arts Centre

o Implementation of the newly adopted Community Local Law 2016

o Adoption of The Municipal Building Control Plan, Domestic Wastewater Management Plan, Warragul and Drouin Civic Park Master Plans and the Child Safety Policy

o A comprehensive Best Value service review was conducted for the Planned Activity Group

Objective 2: Council Leadership and Management

o Adoption of the Pricing Policy for the management of all Council land and buildings

o Commencement of the revaluation of the Shire’s property database

o Development and implementation of an Accounts Payable Fraud Prevention processes

o Development of the Customer Service Excellence Strategy

o Completion of the 2016 General Election and Councillor Induction Program 2016-2022

o Closeout of the 2012-2016 Council Plan and Development and adoption of the new Council Plan 2017-2021

Objective 3: Infrastructure and Community Assets

o Successful delivery of 98% of the adopted projects and programs in the 2016/17 Capital Works Budget, $24.4 million capital works expenditure across 119 projects and programs.

o Completion of the Trafalgar Reserve entry and car park construction.

o Implementation of the new Footpath program with new footpaths undertaken at 24 locations.

­            Objective 4: Growth and Prosperity

o Council’s Advocacy program secured a total non-recurrent grant funding of $5.8 million, which consisted of $4m of federal funding towards the upgrade of the West Gippsland Arts Centre (The upgrade project received state government funding of $4m in the 15/16 financial year).

o Continuation of the Baw Baw marketing promotions program including Radio and Digital advertising and working with Destination Gippsland to promote the Baw Baw region in conjunction with other Gippsland Councils.

o Significant community consultation on the Rural Land Use Review providing guidance and certainty for future planning of our rural areas.

Objective 5: The Environment

o Implementation of the Domestic Wastewater Management Plan.

o Commencement of the Tarwin Street retarding basin wall upgrade.

o Endorsement of the Municipal Emergency Management Plan and the Municipal Fire Management Plan.

·        Service highlights for the year included:

o The completion of the new Warragul Leisure Centre and reopening in September 2016 with 224,015 people visiting our aquatic facilities.

o The commencement of the West Gippsland Arts Centre upgrade and hosting 39,339 people at events presented by West Gippsland Arts Centre throughout the shire.

o Volunteers delivered 24,890 meals on wheels to 377 people.

o The Community Transport Program transported 116 clients to 656 medical appointments, providing 2,221 hours of assistance.

o $25.5 million in grant funding was obtained for Council to support operational and capital projects.

o 1,777 children were seen by the Maternal and Child Health service (whilst 2,497 Children are enrolled in the service).

o Support Workers provided 54,512 hours of home based support services (domestic assistance, personal care, respite and shopping support).

o Social media campaigns resulted in over 1.1 million reaches.

o The Statutory Planning team received 441 planning applications.

o The Public Health team inspected 684 food premises.

o Over 176,000 community members attended libraries to borrow over 276, 600 items, access Wi-Fi, attend programs and participate in events.

o A total of 662 street trees were planted in Warragul and Drouin.

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

·    The report illustrates the Council’s efforts to be a sustainable, transparent organisation and identifies future challenges and projects for the coming financial year.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

·    Only 30 copies of the Annual Report will be printed this year. Baw Baw Shire Council will encourage the community to access the report online.   Copies will be provided to the community upon request.

FINANCIAL IMPACT

·    Council has delivered a financially sustainable result for 2016/17 as certified by the Victorian Auditor-General’s Office.

Consultation

·    In accordance with Section 131 of the Local Government Act 1989, Council will make available:

o Copies of the Annual Report of Operations and the Annual Financial Report and Audit certificates at all Baw Baw Shire Council Customer Service Centre’s.

o A downloadable copy of the report will be featured on the Council’s website.

o Council sent the Annual Report to the Minister for Local Government on Wednesday 27 September 2017 as per The Act.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This Annual Report 2016/17 assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Organisational Excellence

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This Annual Report 2016/1 has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

The Annual Report 2016/17 and Financial Report 2016/17are prepared in accordance with section 131 of the Local Government Act 1989, Local Government (Planning and Reporting) Regulations 2014 and the Local Government (Finance Reporting) Regulations 2004. The Act requires the Council to consider the annual report at a meeting open to the public, within one month after submitting the annual report to the Minister.

POLICY IMPACTS

There are no direct policy impacts with this report.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

 

13.3    Meeting Procedure Local Law Review

Governance Advisor

Directorate:  Corporate and Community Services

 

Ward:          ALL

 

Appendix:     2 attachments

       

 

purpose

For Council to approve and adopt the reviewed Meeting Procedure Local Law to support the regulation of proceedings at Council Meetings, Committee Meetings and other meetings conducted by or on behalf of Council where Council have resolved that the provisions of this Local Law apply. 

REcommendation

That Council:

1. Authorise and adopt the reviewed Meeting Procedure Local Law 2017 and affix it with the Common Seal of the Baw Baw Shire Council;

2. Receive and note the submission that was received throughout the exhibition period in which the reviewed Meeting Procedure Local Law was advertised and write to the submitter informing them of Councils decision;

3. Authorises Officers to give notice of the Local Law in the Government Gazette and a public notice stating the purpose and general purport of the adopted Meeting Procedure Local Law; and

4. Authorise Offices to write to the Minister for Local Government and advise the purpose of the Local Law and Councils resolution to adopt the reviewed Meeting Procedure Local Law.

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·    Under Section 91: Part 5 and Section 111 of The Local Government Act 1989, Councils must have a Meeting Procedure Local Law to govern and regulate the proceedings and functions of Council Meetings (Ordinary, Special and Confidential) as well as other Committees of Council and Advisory Committees.

·    Its function is also to ensure the peace, order and good governance of the municipal district of the Baw Baw Shire Council.

·    Further to this it provides Council with a clear understanding of meeting procedure protocol and no discrepancy between current practice and the stipulations within the Meeting Procedure Local Law. The review has provided Councillors with the opportunity to review protocol on voting, calling of divisions etc.

·    Changes to the Meeting Procedure Local Law have been prompted due to a Notice of Motion that was moved by Council at its meeting on Wednesday 8 February 2017 calling for an investigation into broadcasting and livestreaming of Council Meetings. This report and outcomes, along with the Council’s Community Participation Time Policy have been reviewed in tandem to ensure that they are consistent, relate to one another and there is no ambiguity for the community, Councillors or officers on process and protocol.

·    All amendments that are made or suggested have been reviewed by Macquarie Local Government Lawyers with proposed changes approved.

·    As the Meeting Procedure is a Local Law, there are particular procedures for making a Local Law that must be undertaken. Section 119 of The Local Government Act 1989, needs to be undertaken prior to and post adoption. In the main this includes giving notice in the Government Gazette and ensuring that a copy is sent to the Minister for Local Government.

·    Council invited submissions under section 223 of the Local Government Act 1989 for community feedback which was open for 28 days, from Thursday 24 August 2017 to 21 September 2017. This invited both written and verbal submissions. 

·    One submission was received and is included as an attachment to this report. The submitter has been invited to make a verbal submission on the review of the Meeting Procedure Local Law.

·    The submission included general comments that can be read in full. The items below have been considered in the review of the Meeting Procedure Local Law;

Item

Submitter Suggestion

Inclusion into the Meeting Procedure Local Law

Use of the word Chairperson and Chair

To revert to using Chairman.

No Change Proposed.

Addressing Council 34.2

Use of Mayor in place of Mr Mayor or Madam Mayor.

 

 

 

 

Use of Chairman in place of Chairperson.

Yes. Mayor to be used to address the Mayor instead of Madam or Mr Mayor. For example: Mayor Forte, to represent Councillor Forte who is the chair and mayor.

The use of Chairman as proposed is not supported.

Matters Not Provided For 7.1

To revert to the Victorian Parliament Standing Orders.

No Change Proposed.

Debate 35.8

Delete as irrelevant - any Councillor can speak.

No Change Proposed.

Role of Mayor

Proposing a new Clause specifically to prevent a Mayor speaking on items and if they choose to they must vacate the chair.

No Change Proposed.

Planning Application Process

Requests that Special Council Planning Sub-Committee Meetings are held rather than planning matters being discussing in Councillor Briefings

No Change Proposed.

 

Triple Bottom Line Implications

Financial Impact

There are no major financial implications to reviewing the Meeting Procedure Local Law.

Environmental Impact

There are no environmental implications relating to the review of the Meeting Procedure Local Law.

Community Impact                       

The community will be advised of changes to the Meeting Procedure Local Law and Community Participation Time Policy via Council’s communication channels.

Consultation

The Community was provided with the opportunity to review the Draft Meeting Procedure Local Law with the opportunity to provide input and suggestions via submissions under Section 223 of The Local Government Act 1989.

The public exhibition period was open for 28 days; one written submission was received.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This Report assists with the achievement of the key strategic objective as set out in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Strategic Objective 4. Organisational Excellence

4.2 Positive Leadership, advocacy and decision making around shared goals

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This Meeting Procedure Local Law has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compatible.

LEGAL

As this is a Local Law, the Meeting Procedure Local Law must comply with The Local Government Act 1989 and requirements under section 223, and section 119 relating to the Procedure for making a Local Law.

POLICY IMPACTS

The Local Law changes will have implications to the Community Participation Time Policy which will be reviewed when Council has resolved on this matter. The Community Participation Time policy will have a strong correlation to the protocols around Livestreaming of Council Meetings.

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.

 

 

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

 

13.4    Community Participation Time Policy

Governance Advisor

Directorate:  Corporate and Community Services

 

Ward:          ALL

 

Appendix:     1 attachment

       

 

purpose

To provide Council with the opportunity to review the Community Participation Time Policy.

REcommendation

That Council adopt the Community Participation Time Policy.

 

 

Key POINTS/Issues

·        Councils Meeting Procedure Local Law and Community Participation Time Policy are interrelated and should be read and interpreted in tandem.  

·        Council have reviewed the Meeting Procedure Local Law and released the proposed Draft which invites public submissions for 28 days. This process has been completed and the Meeting Procedure Local Law is listed on this agenda for resolution.

·        Suggested changes to the Meeting Procedure Local Law that relate to community engagement and participation time in Council Meetings include changes to live streaming of Council Meetings and the tabling of petitions and joint letters.

·        The proposed changes that relate to the Community Participation Time Policy are outlined on the attached document and can be viewed via track changes.

·        Other changes made include grammatical and formatting amendments.

·        Explicitly the Community Participation Time Policy includes the following provisions directly out of the Draft Meeting Procedure Local Law:

Council will resolve at the meeting where it is tabled, to either

1.   Receive the petition or joint letter with either an included officer recommendation for noting and / or action, or refer the matter to Council Officers to action and investigate and report back to the lead petition writer as required; or

2.   Refer the petition to a future meeting of the Council not more than four council meetings ahead with a report detailing action and investigation, unless the Council agrees to deal with it at an earlier Council Meeting.

·    4. Submissions a) Types of Submissions

Submitter’s and questions on notice submissions received during Community Participation Time maintain the right to refuse or decline recordings as requested before their submission takes place to protect their rights and privacy.   

Triple Bottom Line Implications

COMMUNITY IMPACT

Financial Impact

There is no financial implication relating to the amendments made to the Meeting Procedure Local Law.

Environmental Impact

There are no environmental impacts that relate to this review.

Community Impact

The community impacts identified include the process for the tabling of petitions and recording of meetings.

Consultation

The changes made in the Policy reflect changes that have been already advertised and communicated to the Community via the public exhibition period of 28 days through the Section 223 process.

Legal/Council Plan/Policy Impact

COUNCIL PLAN

This Report assists with the achievement of the following key strategic objective in the Council Plan 2017-2021:

Strategic Objective 4. Organisational Excellence  

4.2 Positive leadership, advocacy and decision making around shared goals.

CHARTER OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

This report has been reviewed under the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities and is considered compliant.

LEGAL

Changes within the Community Participation Time Policy are consistent with provisions under the Local Government Act 1989 and relate directly to Councils Draft Meeting Procedure Local Law.

POLICY IMPACTS

This policy reflects components of the Draft Meeting Procedure Local Law that is currently under review by Council and the Community. 

CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATION

No officer involved in the preparation of this report has a disclosable interest.


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator


PDF Creator

 

 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

14.    Notices of Motion

Nil Reports

 

 

 


15.    Committee and Delegates Reports


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

16.    Assembly of Councillors

16.1    Assembly of Councillors Report

Governance Advisor

Directorate:  Corporate and Community Services

 

Ward:          All

 

Appendix:     5 attachments

       

 

purpose

To present the written records of Assemblies of Councillors that have occurred.

REcommendation

That Council receives and notes the Assembly of Councillors records tabled for the period from Friday 6 October– Friday 20 October.

 

Key POINTS/Issues

The Local Government Act 1989 requires that the written record of an assembly of councillors be, as soon as practicable, reported at an ordinary meeting of the Council and incorporated into the minutes of that meeting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PDF Creator

 

 

 

PDF Creator 


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


  Council

Meeting Agenda - 25 October 2017

 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator

 

 

 

 

 

17.    Mayoral Minute

 

18.    General Business